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CSBG Archive

Comic Critics #143!

Here is the latest installment of the Comic Critics strip, courtesy of Sean Whitmore (writer) and Brandon Hanvey (artist)! You can check out the first hundred and forty-two strips at the archive here and you can read more about Sean and Brandon at the Comic Critics blog.

Enjoy!

Let us know what you think, either here or at the ComicCritics blog!

32 Comments

It’s funny because they’re true.

They’re all good, but the Flash one is genius.

Awesome. There need to be more of these.

Great one!

Excellent. One of the best if not the best CC ever.

Very funny!

I’d guess this one practically wrote itself. :)

Wolverine, needs, like 40 of those panels just to get up to him joining the X-Men. But that’s not your fault.
Great job, funny and (sadly) true.

Oh god, what an awesome meme this would be…

They’re all funny, but the Hulk one really cracked me up. Nicely done!

lol love how easy it is to prove how messed up and hard it is it to figure out both wonder woman’s and wolverine’s origins. and batman is totaly isane by his origin

I particularly like the Flash, the nonsense of the Hulk, and that wonderful final panel of Wolverine.

This was funny. I had no idea Greg Pak had done that…

All right, guess it’s my turn to be that pesky grammar troll.

Maybe I’m not reading it correctly, but the first sentence of the opening caption just doesn’t feel right to me. I think if you just delete the “how” in the first sentence all would be well.

Those of you more learned that I am who can see how the first sentence is actually correct according to some obscure rule of grammar can feel free to have at me starting . . . now!!!

Oh, and by the way, great strip this time.

I give it a “Bwa” and four “ha”s!

The Wonder Woman is so true. Man, it’s almost strange how she’s become so iconic without anyone, audience or creator, man, woman or child, understanding how the hell she is so appealing.

Let’s see Hawkman!!!

Ed – you’re right about the first sentence. I noticed that too.

But great strip. The Flash and Hulk ones were my favorite.

“Just Kidding” – that Flash one is awesome.

GENIUS! Just pure twisted genius…. and um..Grant won’t be allowed near Wonder Woman anytime soon…lol

>>Maybe I’m not reading it correctly, but the first sentence of the opening caption just doesn’t feel right to me. I think if you just delete the “how” in the first sentence all would be well.

That’s my mistake. Sean caught that in an early version of the comic and asked me to delete the how.

But due to a computer error, I had to go back and redo part of the comic. When I went back I used a version that still had the how in the sentence.

I’ll fix it when I get home and update the comic on the CC site.

The Flash one was brilliant, but you totally missed a trick by not having the final panel in the Batman one say “Goddam Batman” :p

Wow, they’re all great. The Wonder Woman last panel makes me feel funny, though.

The Flash one was brilliant, but you totally missed a trick by not having the final panel in the Batman one say “Goddam Batman” :p

I was actually reading all along hoping they WOULDN’T say that. Would have been too played out and obvious a punchline.

Most of those fell flat for me, but the Flash one is gold!

The Flash one is my biggest pet peeve with DC comics. Skin crawilingly peeved about Wally West. Worst treatment of an Iconic character since Jean-Paul was Batman.

I’ll agree that The Flash is my favorite, as well. As they say, “It’s funny because it’s true.”

The Flash one is my biggest pet peeve with DC comics. Skin crawilingly peeved about Wally West. Worst treatment of an Iconic character since Jean-Paul was Batman.

Eh, Wally West had been reduced to a watered-down Barry Allen years ago, so I didn’t find it to be that bad at all. Besides, I’d argue that way Barry was treated in his final years was much worse than how Wally West was treated.

+1 on the Flash.

Great strip, guys :)

Stealthwise:

“Man, it’s almost strange how she’s become so iconic without anyone, audience or creator, man, woman or child, understanding how the hell she is so appealing.”

The appeal of Wonder Woman is that she is a modern day representation of the classic Greek Mythic hero, placed in the female body to diametrically oppose the typical male Hero of that bygone era, wrapped up in visual American symbolism.

As for nobody understanding that, I’d have to disagree. I think Perez’s run captured that extremely well, and Rucka didn’t do a bad job during his run, either.

But there are problems with the motif of the character and how she is perceived today. America isn’t ‘cool’ anymore. People have little to no knowledge, interest in or respect for mythology today (even though superheroes as a genre are categorically steeped in Greek and other mythos). And the standard comics audience – and arguably the creative pool – has been brainwashed into thinking you can’t have strong women without them being bitchy or slutty (or both).

When you have those kind of odds against you, you’re really facing an uphill battle, whether it’s Diana or any other female character in the DC / Marvel Universe.

Scott:

Worst treatment of an Iconic character since Jean-Paul was Batman.

I can’t see that as bad treatment at all. They wanted to remind us why Batman was better than all of those kewl 90s Image characters so they replaced batman with a kewl 90s image type (bit of a straw man admittedly) for a while so they could bring the real McCoy back.

Seems like pretty good treatment to me.

The problem with Wonder Woman is you just can’t reconcile everything that’s been written with the character, as the cartoon shows. To make it work, you’ve got to pick and choose between the different elements that have appeared over the years. For example, these days it’s easier to emphasize the iconic elements of Wonder Woman and write her as a female Superman, and ignore that bondage stuff altogether.

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