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CSBG Archive

I Saw It Advertised One Day #10

We continue a MONTH of I Saw It Advertised One Day! Each day this January you’ll get a piece looking at advertisements in comic books over the decades that amused me for whatever reason. In each installment, we’ll take a look at three ads!

Here is an archive of all installments of this feature.

Enjoy!

Now I loves me some Barbara Slate. I think she’s a great comic book creator.

That said, the ads for her 1980s DC series, Angel Love, were ridiculously goofy.

Cocaine?!!
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A 1969 ad for marbles would be like a 2011 ad for POGs.


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I love the father in this Daisy BB gun ad. “Woah, woah, I don’t want him watching TV! I better get him a gun!”


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That’s all for this installment! If you can think of some goofy comic book ads you’d like to see me feature here, drop me a line at bcronin@comicbookresources.com. Do not make suggestions in the comment section, so that they can still be a surprise for future readers! In fact, I think I’ll just delete comments that contain future suggestions.

25 Comments

Cocaine?!!

By the way this is going, someone should publish a collection of Daisy BB gun ads. Fantagraphics, are you up to the task?

Cocaine?!!

Why is the dad so concerned about him learning with someone else’s gun? That’s some weird logic right there.

Cocaine?!!

Did the phrase “knuckle down” come from marble-shooting? I never knew that.

Cocaine?!!

Is that pistol for dad’s own fun and target practice really only 5 cents?

Cocaine?!!

It IS a plot point, though, you know. I picked up the 8 issues and the special of Angel Love for cheap within the last year, and it is good stuff. What else has Barbara Slate done in comics (or other art, actually?)

Wait… is she offended about the concaine, or does she want some?

And there’s no way that marbles ad came from 1969. Two of the kids are wearing Jughead hats for crying out loud.

My mom taught me and my brother how to play marbles in 1986. I was eleven. We all had our own marbles and would play almost every night for about a year. Imagin my surprise when I realised no one else in the the world was playing marbles.

I came acrose a vendor selling marbles at a fair this past summer and my kids (7 and 5) wanted some because they looked neat. I’ve been wondering if I should teach them the game…

Cocaine?!!

Why is the dad so concerned about him learning with someone else’s gun? That’s some weird logic right there.

I think there is something Freudian going on there.

I came acrose a vendor selling marbles at a fair this past summer and my kids (7 and 5) wanted some because they looked neat. I’ve been wondering if I should teach them the game…

Marbles is a fun game. I say teach it to them!

I seem to be in the extreme minority here, but I don’t find the Angel Love ad bad at all. The cocaine panel really does pique my interest in the book.

It’s the way the “cocaine” panel really doesn’t fit with the tone of the rest of the ad that’s so jarring — which is, I’m sure, the intent. Problem is, with the close-up on her eyes, it doesn’t tell you the tone of what she’s saying. Is she alarmed that someone is using cocaine? Is she surprised to find it at her workplace? Is she pleased that she’s at a party where cocaine is being used? Is she requesting some from a friend? Is she desperate for another hit? There’s absolutely no way of telling, which makes the ad a strange sell…is this character a goody-two-shoes who never thought her friends would use drugs, or is she a prostitute? (The first panel doesn’t clear things up any.) You’d probably want to have some idea before you picked up an issue.

Of course, the impact of the “cocaine” panel is even more jarring with the ad taken out of context, and if (like me) you kind of skimmed the text, and looked at the ad with the impression that it was a 60s-era Archie-style comic. But that’s hardly the ad’s fault.

My 6 year old daughter plays marbles with us regularly. We stuffed a $1 bag of marbles into her Christmas stocking and those have seen more action than some of the higher priced toys!

It’s the way the “cocaine” panel really doesn’t fit with the tone of the rest of the ad that’s so jarring — which is, I’m sure, the intent. Problem is, with the close-up on her eyes, it doesn’t tell you the tone of what she’s saying. Is she alarmed that someone is using cocaine? Is she surprised to find it at her workplace? Is she pleased that she’s at a party where cocaine is being used? Is she requesting some from a friend? Is she desperate for another hit? There’s absolutely no way of telling, which makes the ad a strange sell…is this character a goody-two-shoes who never thought her friends would use drugs, or is she a prostitute? (The first panel doesn’t clear things up any.)

All that is exactly what I thought made the ad WORK. Not knowing the context made me want to read the book to find out the exact questions you posed.

Cocaine?!!

Knuckle down!

NRA medals!

Is this the origin of Dr. Rockso?

When I was in third grade (which must have 79′ or 80′, we actually had a bit of a “marble renaissance” in the school I went to, which was, of all things, I private Catholic school in Florida. We all had our pouches of marbles and would play religiously before school and during lunch, trying to win each others’ marbles. It was very competetive and lead to more than a few “brush ups”. And I mean everyone played (at least all of the boys), all the way from Grade 1 through Grade 6.

One details that sticks in my mind so much is that the pouches of choice to carry your marbles in were those old blue velvet pouches that bottles of Crown Royale used to come in (for those of you who don’t know Crown Royale was a liquor that was inexplicably popular in the late 70’s, early 80’s). Those tell-tale blue pouches used to be damn near ubiquitous in our school – just about everyone had one filled with marbles. I don’t know where they all came from – apparently a lot of my friends’ parents’ must have drank gallons of that stuff.

Not sure if anyone in my age group experienced anything similar in their schools – it may have been just some quirkly thing isolated to our little corner of Florida. It amazes me now, but I remember being really, really, really into marbles at the time.

Maybe I missed it, but has Brian posted any of those Count Dante Martial Arts ads? Those things were scary and ridulous all at the same time. I also remember some ads from some of the earliest ASM issues (I’m talking back from the Lee/Ditko days) where you could order a real live Spider Monkey for $20.00. $20.00 was worth a lot more then than it was now, but I wonder how many kids actually mailed in a Jackson and actually got one of those things (for the monkeys’ sake, I hope not a lot).

Cocaine?!!

I didn’t know DC did romance comics in the ’80s. I wonder why I never heard of it. I really want to read it now just to find out about the cocaine. (Which I suppose means the ad is doing its job.)

I love the fact that the Daisy ad tells you to shoot indoors, as long as it was 20′. Wonder how many kids had access to a room that size?

Cocaine?!? Julio, you said this shit was heroin? I’ma put a cap in yo ass!

In my neighborhood, marbles were very popular as ammo for our high-powered Wham-O slingshots (wristrockets). Look dad, I can put Jimmy’s eye out from way over here!

Cocaine?!!

Perhaps the interest in this ad will spark DC to collect Angel Love (yeah, right).

But like I said, I have read this, and it IS a good book. As T said, the ad works BECAUSE it’s jarring. However, that jarring aspect (“girly”/Archie-esque art used in service of “adult” material) (and that’s “adult” not in a pornographic sense) works to the series’s detriment. It’s kind of a sitcom on paper, really.

Man, I could SO spoil stuff for you guys, but I just won’t.

Unless you ask nice.

Last year I ran a blog that also featured both obscure and iconic ads, in this case that ran in Amazing Spider-Man up until the early 70’s.

http://spiderads.blogspot.com

I did it in hopes of being able to make it to the 80’s with the bubble gum and early video game ads, but alas real life caught up with me.

Hope you succeed where I fell short!

Wow, you did a lot of interesting stuff there, Arvin! Thanks for the head’s up!

For whatever reason my favorite part of this Daisy ad, and the previous one, is that dad should buy himself a BB pistol when getting his son a BB rifle.

@Ed – I take it you’re not much of a drinker because Crown Royale is still quite popular and still comes in a velvet bag.

@Michael Mayket

Well, my drinking days are long over (parenthood will do that), but even in the days when I drank high quality liquor, I didn’t see Crown Royale being consumed too much. I just didn’t move in the right circles I guess.

Much love for those velvet pouches however. I will always associate a happy little piece of my childhood with those things.

FYI, those Crown Royal pouches are also top-of-the-line gamer fodder. Across the continental US there are probably tens of thousands of the things being used to store dice.

The Crown Royale *bags* are still popular too, for gamers (especially of RPGs) who carry around a lot of dice.

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