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CSBG Archive

Comic Critics #145!

Here is the latest installment of the Comic Critics strip, courtesy of Sean Whitmore (writer) and Brandon Hanvey (artist)! You can check out the first hundred and forty-four strips at the archive here and you can read more about Sean and Brandon at the Comic Critics blog.

Enjoy!

Let us know what you think, either here or at the ComicCritics blog!

31 Comments

I know next to nothing about The Green Hornet, but from the trailers it looks like it’s going to be a heck of a lot of fun to watch.

And I say that as someone experienced in evaluating trailers and saying, “This movie is going to be complete crap” and ending up being 100% correct.

Silly Josh. You don’t need to immerse yourself in Green Hornet lore to have that feeling.

Also, this comic is .037 panels too long.

I saw the movie on monday and I went itno it thinking it was goign to be pretty bad.

In fact, it was a lot of fun. We aren’t talking about high art or anything, but I quite enjoyed it.

…and I am known to be a stick-in-the-mud about movies around my world.

Okay, that was awesome. Two thumbs up.

I don’t get that last 0.37th of a panel

I watched almost the entire Green Hornet TV show marathon on Sci-Fi the other day, and now… now I feel the same way. Before, I didn’t care! Noooooooo!

Actually, I’ve heard it’s pretty good, so maybe one’s spirit will be crushed in a different way if it flops.

@Bill Reed
Please, don’t mention Spirit while the rest of us are in the context of pulp heroes and modern movies.

I don’t think this strip was too long. However, I do think it is about a half an inch too wide. The joke would work much better in narrower panels.

I think it’s cute but agree, it would benefit from editing – I wouldn’t take anything out but just rearrange it – panels 2 and 3 would actually work as one image, panels 4 and 5 then 6 and 7 just needed to be half-panels – punchiness is key with this type of humour.

I think it should be thicker. Invest in 3-D tech and charge $20 more.

Too many words this week. The story is told pretty effectively just by Josh’s eyebrows.

Good work.

I mean, the amount of words is just fine, but I think the whole strip is framed pretty effectively by Josh’s eyebrow movements and the wikipedia screenshot. Seriously good work.

love how after all his research trying to learn about the green hornet josh still has his pesimistic attitude when it comes to film versions of comic book characters wind ing up flat. not to mention seeing him streamline the old show.

I like how you reference that recent article by Patton Oswalt on Wired without actually referencing it. Subtlety is nice. :)

Michel Gondry can do no wrong (and I’m including Be Kind Rewind in that statement).

Great start to the new year.

But yeah about 1/3456 too long in the panel department as usual.

funkygreenjerusalem

January 13, 2011 at 8:44 pm

I like how you reference that recent article by Patton Oswalt on Wired without actually referencing it. Subtlety is nice. :)

I didn’t make that connection, and if this is a reference to it, I’m glad it’s subtle – there’s nothing sadder than an old man trying to turn back the clock because he doesn’t like the advantages the youth of the day have on him.

I didn’t make that connection, and if this is a reference to it, I’m glad it’s subtle – there’s nothing sadder than an old man trying to turn back the clock because he doesn’t like the advantages the youth of the day have on him.

That’s really all or most of what you took away from that piece? Really?!

funkygreenjerusalem

January 14, 2011 at 2:20 am

That’s really all or most of what you took away from that piece? Really?!

The Patton Oswald one?

Yeah, that’s all there is to the piece.

First line:
“I’m not a nerd. I used to be one, back 30 years ago when nerd meant something.”

Last paragraph:
“So the topsoil we’re coated in needs to wash away for a while. I want my daughter to have a 1987 the way I did and experience the otaku thrill.”

Don’t get dazzled by his little BS about making geek culture into a singularity, it’s a sad old man upset because he spent a lot of time learning about comics and books, and now everyone can learn just as much in a few minutes.
It’s an entire piece on how much better it was back when he was a kid – ignoring that everything was better for everyone back when they were a kid.
He’s upset by progress, as he can’t see how people can still feel the same way about certain books/films, because he can’t anymore.

I’m not saying you’re totally wrong. There are elements of that in there. But I really think you’re throwing away the baby with the bathwater on that one. Regardless of his motivations, there are some good points in there.

And I really don’t see how he ignored the fact that everyone thinks things were better when they were kids. It wasn’t that he ignored that, it’s that it’s irrelevant. Even if everyone does think things were better when they were kids, that doesn’t somehow magically prove that everyone who says so is wrong. It’s like a stopped clock being right twice a day; some of the people will be right when they say that, some of the people will be wrong and just suffering from misguided nostalgia.

By the way I disagree with maybe 50% of the article myself. I’m not 100% behind it. I just think it’s unfair to oversimplify and sweep it under the carpet like that.

[bq]there’s nothing sadder than an old man trying to turn back the clock because he doesn’t like the advantages the youth of the day have on him.[/bq]

That’s not quite how I read it.

To me he sounded more like one of those indie music geeks that get angry when they’re favorite band gets popular enough to “go mainstream”. He was all “I liked it before everyone knew about it”.

On a sie note, how do I quote on the CSBG forums? [BQ] doesn’t work…

That’s not quite how I read it.

To me he sounded more like one of those indie music geeks that get angry when they’re favorite band gets popular enough to “go mainstream”. He was all “I liked it before everyone knew about it”.

That’s a much more accurate criticism, I think.

AverageJoeEveryman

January 14, 2011 at 12:57 pm

“To me he sounded more like one of those indie music geeks that get angry when they’re favorite band gets popular enough to “go mainstream”. He was all “I liked it before everyone knew about it”.

That is the perfect way to sum it up I think. Well done. “Oh no (Band X) sells lots of records now! Fuckin’ sellouts! I hate them!”

I get what Oswalt’s saying about the instant accessibility of all things nerdy, but I don’t think he made a successful case as to why that’s a bad thing. The penchant for strip-mining the past for ideas was a good point, but only tenuously connected.

Aside from that, I have the same criticism as Carlos. That bit berating the guys at the gym wearing Boba Fett shirts gave me douchechills.

I get what Oswalt’s saying about the instant accessibility of all things nerdy, but I don’t think he made a successful case as to why that’s a bad thing.

That’s because it’s not. I grew up in the era of IN-accessibility that Oswalt is mourning, and it sucked. I frigging LOVE living in the Amazon “Buy With 1-Click” age we are in now.

Same here. Granted, it was the tail-end of that era, but I still remember not being able to find standup comedy albums anywhere and getting the only Transformers fix I could through the handful of one-episode-per-tape VHS releases that were impossible to find.

these days it is really easyto be a fan of everything, which is basically the same as being a fan of nothing. But I wouldnt go back to the dark ages of preinternet for anything.

funkygreenjerusalem

January 14, 2011 at 8:25 pm

And I really don’t see how he ignored the fact that everyone thinks things were better when they were kids. It wasn’t that he ignored that, it’s that it’s irrelevant. Even if everyone does think things were better when they were kids, that doesn’t somehow magically prove that everyone who says so is wrong. It’s like a stopped clock being right twice a day; some of the people will be right when they say that, some of the people will be wrong and just suffering from misguided nostalgia.

But he give no reason why the current way of things is bad, except that it’s different to what he had.
If he showed why any of this was bad, there would be a point behind it, but he keeps bringing it back to how it is for him.
And honestly, his argument that people don’t spend as much time absorbing geek items, like Lord Of The Rings, is utter BS.
Most of society may read it/watch it and move on, but there are going to be people who become just as obsessive as people were in the 70’s – only now they can reach out to others who feel the same way.

So, I’m seeing no case for there being anything wrong with geek culture going mainstream and being easily accessible, so I’m calling it out for being someone having a cry that it’s not the same as when they were a kid – he keeps going to that well in the article, so I think it’s a fair call.

By the way I disagree with maybe 50% of the article myself. I’m not 100% behind it. I just think it’s unfair to oversimplify and sweep it under the carpet like that.

What parts do you agree with?

None of it worked for me – he made a poor case, and the article wasn’t that entertaining, and quite frankly, a total mess.

I’m also unsure how I’m oversimplifying – as I showed, the opening line and the closing paragraph come right back to that point.
There’s nothing else in that article.

.
To me he sounded more like one of those indie music geeks that get angry when they’re favorite band gets popular enough to “go mainstream”. He was all “I liked it before everyone knew about it”.

I’m going to stick with the sad old man trying to turn back the clock – because he seems to think it would be better if things went back to how they were, pre-internet, and that people have truly lost something because now it’s easier to get the books they want to read.
People being able to learn more about something they love faster than before is a good thing, not a bad thing, and he’s sore because he didn’t have that.

An odd thing is, as pointed out on the Wait What podcast, Patton Oswalt makes his money doing stand up full of geek references – he needs the guys in the gym with the Bobba Fett shirts on. That’s his audience.
Truly bizarre.

funkygreenjerusalem

January 14, 2011 at 8:29 pm

these days it is really easyto be a fan of everything, which is basically the same as being a fan of nothing.

Nope.
Not true.
Maybe if you’re into playing ‘I’m a TRUE fan’ or ‘I’m a bigger fan because I got into them when’, but that’s only ever mattered to the saddest people in the room, desperate for any form of being #1 at something, ANYTHING.

You can be a fan of something without making it your life.
Heck, variety is the spice of life, so what’s wrong with being a fan of lots of different things?

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