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Whilce Portacio’s take on Batman Confidential #1, Page 6

I know folks were curious as to how Whilce Portacio brought Andy Diggle’s script to life in the published edition of Batman Confidential #1 (page six), so I figured I would share it with you all now…

Now, do note that Portacio, unlike the entrants, had the benefit of being able to communicate with the editor and/or Diggle himself, in case he wanted to make changes, so Portacio did not follow the script to the tee, which is something that the entrants had more of a duty to do (since they couldn’t confer on the page beyond what was right there in the script). That’s why I didn’t show it you all initially, because I didn’t want people to use it as a guide.

But now that your entries are in, it doesn’t matter! So ta da!

22 Comments

Where´s panel 7 and the cofee table, Portacio??????

@YearZero

Read the post.

That’s why he’s Whilice Portacio… and we’re not.

:)

Having never seen this page before, I think I am biased towards the contest versions.

Honestly, I actually prefer several of the contest versions to this one.

Certainly, I don’t mean that as a dig on Mr Portacio in anyway, as his page looks great,
but some of the contest pages really established the scene in my mind.

So much so, that I have trouble seeing this variation on the script.

Congratulations to everyone who entered the contest for doing such a great job.

Seeing the published page by Portacio, I’m even more impressed with the contestants’ work.

Huh
That’s uhh
cool

:|

I know, I know. That was a joke.

But seriously, Portacio did the right thing.
In my humble opinion, you shouldn´t put seven panels in a page with an action sequence.
It may look Ok on the script, but when you have to drew the thing, you´re in trouble.

Well, that kinda sucked.

I think the contestants did it better on this page.

Hi,

It would be difficult to create it anyway so i appreciate the contestants efforts.

Take care
Jeff Casmer

That is one dainty kick.

I’m glad to see that Portacio did what I really appreciated seeing from a few of the contest entries in showing only Batman’s cape as he escapes into the kitchen. It’s a hard scene to pull off, and adding his legs or feet or entire body into that scene looked awkward no matter how well it was drawn. Plus, showing only his cape helps with that classic Batman-as-a-phantom mystique.

That shouldn’t be too hard to beat.

Didn’t have the original issue, cool to see how Whilce handled it.

What? He didn’t even do the zebra stripe mask?

David Baron on colors, no?

Oh sorry, my sarcasm detector wasn’t working properly. :)

Hey, I read this blog all the time, so I’m not sure how I missed this contest. I’m assuming other artists submitted their versions of this page based off the script? I would be grateful if anyone could provide a link to that!

Thanks.

I can’t believe I’ve missed the deadline… I’m like Brian Hitch… but with crappy drawing habilities.

@Patrick C: just click on the top of the post where it says “Temptation’s Page”. There should be a link there where you can see all the submissions.

@The Dude: Thanks!

This was really awesome, and I can’t believe I almost missed it. Great contest, great entries.

Note that Portacio, unlike the entrants, had the benefit of being able to communicate with the editor and/or Diggle himself, in case he wanted to make changes, so Portacio did not follow the script to the tee, which is something that the entrants had more of a duty to do (since they couldn’t confer on the page beyond what was right there in the script).

And I call bullshit.

Sometimes writers put things in scripts that are difficult or impossible to either depict in a dynamic visual manner, or can’t on one page, which I suspect may be why Portacio had to confer with the editor. By insisting the entrants work within boundaries that Portacio himself couldn’t, the entrants were held to an unfair and unreasonable standard.

What the hell was a coffee table, for example, doing in a bedroom? If the dwelling was high-class enough to include a serving hatch, why would there be a bedroom bordering a kitchen, and why was the baby on a cot? If the two over the shoulder shots were identical, save for what was in front of the Killer, than how was the artist to indicate that he was swinging to the right? Why would that even matter, so long as the artist held consistently to the layout of the dwelling established heretofore? If the little girl is a “baby”, how she able to stand up? If she’s indeed old enough to be standing, then, how can she be “oblivious” to what’s about to happen? Don’t even young children understand what guns are?

It’s not surprising then, that Portacio diverged from much of this. Batman dives through a doorway, not a “serving hatch”, which is fine. (Was there some plot-specific reason that the story required it to be a serving hatch?) The speed lines next to the killer in the second over-the-shoulder shot show him swinging to the left, not the right (because again, it doesn’t matter, an example of the writer micromanaging the script for no reason). The Killer doesn’t just aim at the darkened kitchen, but FIRES at it, giving him more of an opportunity to depict action. And whereas the end of the sequence featured three actions (Batman swinging in from the kitchen door frame to kick one of the Uzi’s out of the Killer’s hand, then kicking him in the abdomen to send him flying, and then the Killer crashing into the coffee table), Portacio depicted ONE, so that he could have just six panels on the page, and devote more space to each one.

I’m sure the entrants wish they could’ve done that.

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