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Top 125 Comic Book Artists: #95-91

Here are the next five artists on the countdown, based on your votes for your favorite comic book artists of all-time! Here is the list of all artists featured so far!

I’ll give you a sample page for each artist.

95 Travis Charest – 131 points (4 first place votes)

94 J. Scott Campbell – 136 points (2 first place votes)

93 Guy Davis – 137 points (2 first place votes)

92 Darick Robertson – 138 points (1 first place vote)

91 Ed McGuinness – 139 points (1 first place vote)

19 Comments

Charest and Campbell – heck yes. Charest should be way higher – though he was a Jim Lee clone at the start the style he changed to later on, despite a far from prolific output, has influenced many of the big names dominating cape books today – NcNiven, Yu, Cheung, Coipel (sorta).

The others – not so much, sorry.

Apart from Robertson I know none of them, but judging from the sample pages, Campbell seems fairly run of the mill to me. Generic superhero art. The McGuiness and Davis pages are pretty cool, though. Which comic is the Charest page from?

I like Charest and Guy Davis. Robertson is all right. Campbell and McGuiness… no thanks.

Ed (A Different One)

April 14, 2011 at 6:38 am

Love that interchange between Abe & Roger (I think that’s Roger) in the Guy Davis clip. Two guys with similar F-upped backgrounds sharing a moment.

And I loved, loved, loved Darick Robertson on TransMet. Seeing his visual take on Ellis’s insane idea of the future sucked me into that series just as much as Ellis’s writing did (and, for some storylines, even more so). In my mind, that was clearly the case of a talented writer and a talented artist collaborating to produce something much more than the sum of its parts.

nice to see ed and davis show up on the list. along with darrick robinson. love the hellboy pannel

Charest and Campbell? Ugh.

Ed McGuiness has one flaw that keeps me from enjoying his work, but it’s a flaw that is hard to ignore: his horrible, steroid bodybuilder anatomies he gives all the men. There’s a reason why you never see an athlete or even a power lifter with the sort of grotesque anatomy of a bodybuilder has, and that’s because a bodybuilder’s physique is strictly made for posing, not for actual functional activity. A bodybuilder looks ridiculous trying to run, fight, or doing anything athletic; it’s actually a horrible physique to have for doing anything actually functional.

Think of the best and most powerful performance-based athletes you can think of, and none have the bodybuilder physique. Looking at his steroid Batman and being told to believe he can even do a somersault much less kung fu acrobatics just doesn’t work for me.

When he’s not drawing men though he’s awesome.

Jiminy, a whole day of people whose stuff looks vaguely familiar but whom I don’t know by name at all. Mostly that just makes me feel old. Reckon I’ll just sit here gumming my porridge and waiting for Jack Cole and C.C. Beck.

Conflicted day for me.

Travis Charest has evolved into a really good artist, but he was terrible.

J Scott Campbell – Nah

Guy Davis – Yay!

Darick Robertson – Really good on Transmetropolitan and The Boys – though characters’ faces change dramatically from panel to panel. Really bad on Punisher, mediocre on Fury.

Ed McGuinness – Has quite a nice animated style – and losing the silly builds would ruin that, but then he turns out a lot of really poor pages like the one above. That shot of Jonn on the right is just terrible.

Ed McGuinness – Has quite a nice animated style – and losing the silly builds would ruin that, but then he turns out a lot of really poor pages like the one above. That shot of Jonn on the right is just terrible.

I don’t see why the silly builds are at all essential to retaining an animated style to his art. In fact I think it would enhance that aspect of his art by making the people look less stiff and make them seem to move more plausibly.

Oh my goodness, why are ANY of these guys as low as they are!?!?

Okay, okay, because it’s a field with many, many talented artists. But seriously, Darick Robertson at 92??? Does know one remember Transmet anymore?

Aaaand rant over. I’m too young to be this crotchety.

Hey Bombie, those awesome Travis Charest pages are from his run on Wildc.a.t.s, which is really worth checking out not only for his outstanding art but also for the storyline written by Alan Moore.

Leslie Fontenelle

April 14, 2011 at 10:28 am

Campbell? You gotta be kidding.

I’m only sad that Guy Davis is so low. His art on BPRD is wholly responsible for raising it from a good book to an awesome book.

I find Guy Davis’ sketchy, blocky humans a little off-putting, but I do love B.P.R.D. I think that sequence is more of a proof of Mignola and Arcudi’s writing skills than Davis’ pencils.

“Yeah, that’s a bad one.”

Classic, understated comedy.

Interesting that these five so far have been more decisive than any of the other lists of 5 in the top 125 so far. Personally, the only one I think needs to be higher here is Guy Davis. I’ve never seen Campbell interior work, and I think that McGuinness work is a poor example of his work.

McGuinness, Robertson, and Davis all fall in the category of quality, dependable artists whose work I have enjoyed over the years, and I feel like the lower reaches of this list seem about right for them.

Travis Charest I legitimately think is one of the most purely talented artists (artist, not storyteller) to ever enter mainstream comics, and had he drawn more than about 18 issues in his career, I would have considered voting for him. But seriously, anyone that hasn’t seen his work on those first few issues of WildCATS (2nd series), and especially the WildCATS/X-Men: The Golden Age one-shot should really do themselves a favor and check it out. Just beyond gorgeous stuff. I truly believe that if he could have maintained a monthly comic with a good writer, he would have become the biggest superstar in the industry.

As for Campbell, well, he is what he is. I really appreciate that Brian chose a sample page that isn’t overloaded with breasts so people can try to get a sense of his ability instead of what made him popular. He is a capable artist who has strong storytelling skills and has done some good work, particularly with covers. But, on the other hand, I don’t exactly think he’s been *good* for comics. His most famous work tends to be the kind of stuff that gives the industry a bad rap. I think Joe Madureira and Michael Turner are in the same boat, so I’m curious where/if they’ll turn up.

I don’t see why the silly builds are at all essential to retaining an animated style to his art.

It’s not essential for any animated style, just the one McGuinness is going for. Any I don’t find his art stiff when he’s on form (which he isn’t in the shot above).

But seriously, anyone that hasn’t seen his work on those first few issues of WildCATS (2nd series), and especially the WildCATS/X-Men: The Golden Age one-shot should really do themselves a favor and check it out. Just beyond gorgeous stuff.

His work in The Complete James Robinson Wildcats is still pretty poor, but he was showing occasional glimmers of talent. By the time he left Wildcats he was very good – but yeah his work on Wildcats/X-Men and Metabarons was great.

What series is that Charest page from?

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