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CSBG Archive

Comic Critics #158!

Here is the latest installment of the Comic Critics strip, courtesy of Sean Whitmore (writer) and Brandon Hanvey (artist)! You can check out the first hundred and fifty-seven strips at the archive here and you can read more about Sean and Brandon at the Comic Critics blog.

Enjoy!

Let us know what you think, either here or at the ComicCritics blog!

29 Comments

Yes, because I am the one fantasizing to escape my own harsh reality, dammit.

I would totally read a comic about a 5 year old delusional Bruce Wayne who thinks he’s Batman. DC? Get on that. Thanks.

I am justice. I am the night. I am up past my bedtime.

But that’s the take we’ve been reading all along, Caanan. At least, I think that’s the joke here. You could go on and on, and say that a delusional Alfred locked up in Arkham has been imagining a life of useful service where he takes care of a delusional five year old that imagines he’s Batman. Or it’s all been the drunken hallucinations of Bill Finger, who’s been pretending to be a delusional Alfred who pretends he’s a butler taking care of a little Bruce who imagines he’s Batman…

Anyway, it’s pretty strange to unilaterally decide that a story is only valid if works on a single level of “reality.” It’s all made up! Why is Joe’s fantasy world any less “real” than the framing story where he’s a diabetic kid?

“Or it’s all been the drunken hallucinations of Bill Finger, who’s been pretending to be a delusional Alfred who pretends he’s a butler taking care of a little Bruce who imagines he’s Batman…”

BRRRRAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM

Why are these never funny?

anonymous coward

April 17, 2011 at 4:50 pm

Because the creators have never read a comic strip before in their life and have decided to try to make them too long with multiple ideas instead of concise and quick.

It’s especially funny because Joe the Barbarian turned out to be a much more conventional narrative than Morrison’s Batman turned out to be. Both the fantasy quest and real-life elements were fairly conventional in their sentimentality and storytelling style. JtB is perhaps the least experimental thing Morrison’s written since All-Star Superman, and the least fanciful thing he’s written in over a decade.

With a name like “anonymous coward”, it’s gotta be true!

The punchline was funny, but didn’t really seem to fit with where the comic started.

Love this strip. Don’t love people being so critical about it.

Batman And Hobbes.

Tom Fitzpatrick

April 17, 2011 at 8:36 pm

Comics provides escapism for everyone who wishes to avoid real life.

This might be the funniest one of all. Well done guys. You keep getting better and better

funkygreenjerusalem

April 17, 2011 at 9:20 pm

Because the creators have never read a comic strip before in their life and have decided to try to make them too long with multiple ideas instead of concise and quick.

I love reading a sentence, that’s calling someone out for not being concise, run as long and scatter-shot as this one does.

I think it’s pretty easy to understand what “anonymous coward” wrote. A fourth grader could understand that, funkygreenjerusalem. It’s not long or even “as long” as the comic nor is it “scatter-shot.” In fact it’s quite straight forward.
No, I don’t find this series funny. But I do like the characters. They have well-rounded personalities and the animation style is easy on the eye. You could do a lot worse with most of the web comics out there.

scary how josh describes the reason some read comics. to escape their realities for a bit. plus also love josh being picky over what type of work grant does as his reason for not trying joe the barbarian.

Hear, hear! Grant Morrison is the best comic book writer in comics now. Except when he does those pesky “creator owned” works. Gross. Why can’t he just write Batman punching stuff more often?

funkygreenjerusalem

April 17, 2011 at 11:42 pm

I think it’s pretty easy to understand what “anonymous coward” wrote. A fourth grader could understand that, funkygreenjerusalem.

None the less, it was neither concise, or quick.

It’s not long or even “as long” as the comic nor is it “scatter-shot.” In fact it’s quite straight forward.

It was never compared to the length of the strip, so that’s an odd defense, but it is quite scatter-shot – it contains 3-4 ideas within a single a sentence, none of which are separated with punctuation.

Basically, it was the sentence equivalent of what the poster believed to be wrong with the strip.

No, I don’t find this series funny. But I do like the characters.

Jesus Christ.

I love this strip. Some strips are better than others, but it’s fairly consistant. I find it odd that anyone would continue to read the strip and then complain about it in the comments section here. I would say something like “get a life”, but then I realize just where I am on the internet and sigh…

I completely don’t get that last panel.

If anybody goes and reads Joe the Barbarian because of this (the BEST comic to come out in years….), then this strip has served well.

:)

Joe the Barbarian is possibly the least interesting thing Morrison’s ever done. Sure, it makes the obvious point that Josh makes here in panel four, but that could easily have been expressed in a single issue and did not need (what was it, eight?). How could anyone read the last two issues of Batman Inc. and then claim that Joe the B is the best comic to come out in years?

The art is stunning, though. I hope this guy continues to work with Morrison on something more interesting. Hell, let’s have him redraw Animal Man and Doom Patrol and all the other brilliant Morrison comics that suffer from poor and incompetent artwork.

There’s a burger place I hate. I get in my car and drive over to it, four or five times a week. The food is terrible. The service is slow. The prices are outrageously high. Why do I keep going? Perhaps I’m mad.

But at least I don’t keep clicking on webcomics I don’t like and writing whiny comments for attention.

In my comic strip comment sections I want real actions and consequences.

Anyway, this comic strip is saying that people who call Joe the Barbarian dumb escapism are blind to the fact that the superhero comics they love are also dumb escapism.

My question is, are people actually saying that about Joe the Barbarian? I thought it was an amazing book. It captured childhood pretend-world/imagination-land/beanstalk/pillow-fort nostalgia more deftly than any other book (comic or otherwise) I’ve read in a long time.

It was full of the type of stuff you only kind of remember as you are waking up in the morning, and then forget by the time you get to the bathroom to brush your teeth. The art was phenomenal, AND you can reread it and try to synch up the entire series with the tour of the house in the first issue.

And it had Captain Picard and toilet submarine dwarves. Cowardly inventors dressed in bird skulls that live in the top of a mountain. It was like Teddy Ruxpin on acid.

I hope they put out an oversized hardcover.

I’m digressing. So is the comic strip setup a straw man, or are solely-superhero people really railing against this book?

I think I’m going to become that guy who says “Needs more ROM” after every strip.

As for this one, needs more ROM.

“My question is, are people actually saying that about Joe the Barbarian?”

I don’t see much of anything being said about it anywhere (though I admit I don’t surf the comics community boards like I used to), and nobody talks about it at my LCS. But to be fair it seems unless you go to gaming day on Saturdays, nobody talks about comics at the shop, period – the attitude is seemingly more like “Quick, before anybody sees us, grab your shit and pay for it and let’s get out of here!”

Totally agree with you about Joe The Barbarian, Joe. A great series.

People might not be saying it outright, but a lot of potential readers must be making the same sort of decision Josh does in this strip, since Joe The Barbarian sold significantly less well than Morrison’s superhero work. Same writer as Batman Inc, also a great artist, but people didn’t buy it because it doesn’t “matter” (wasn’t in DCU continuity), or it wasn’t “real.”

It’s like everybody in fandom is addicted to these two giant shared worlds, and there’s just no room for more personal fantasy realms like Joe’s. But in other mediums like movies and novels, stories like Inception and Game of Thrones are enjoyed by millions. It’s only in comics that we squish everything together, and treat shared fictional universes like they’re real places we can check in on every week.

Gerson King Combo

April 18, 2011 at 4:54 pm

Oh this strip is no fun anymore no sir!!!!!!!!

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