web stats

CSBG Archive

Top 125 Comic Book Artists: #80-76

Here are the next five artists on the countdown, based on your votes for your favorite comic book artists of all-time! Here is the list of all artists featured so far!

I’ll give you a sample page for each artist.

80 Humberto Ramos – 157 points (5 first place votes)

79 Mark Bagley – 160 points (1 first place vote)

78 Leinil Francis Yu – 165 points (1 first place vote)

77 Adam Kubert – 166 points (2 first place votes)

76 Todd McFarlane – 167 points (3 first place votes)

55 Comments

Wow…how the mighty have fallen. Would never have expected Todd McFarlane to be this low. I’m also surprised Mark Bagley wasn’t higher.

Meanwhile, I’m sure they’re nice people but Humberto Ramos and Leinil Francis Yu (along with Chris Bachalo) are two of my least favorite artists in comics today. With Ramos and Bachalo I’m never sure exactly what’s going on in the action…I guess their linear storytelling doesn’t work for me. Yu just has pencils that aren’t aesthetically pleasing for me.

What is the Adam Kubert page from?

Wolverine (Vol. 3) #74.

And once again I’m left scratching my head with how popular Humberto Ramos seems to be. I’m not even trying to be snarky, I honestly can’t understand how can someone like his art.

As I said in another post, I can’t stand it when he draws any human who isn’t Spidey, but I’d take McFarlane over Jim Lee any day. For me, Todd was the only one of the Image bunch who was in any way interesting. His crazy page designs are up there with Adams, Rogers and Breyfogle.

(Okay, Liefeld was also interesting, but in an “interesting” way).

The comments complaining about Bachalo, Ramos and Yu are interesting. I find these three to be among my very favorites at Marvel. They decidedly do not have the “new” Marvel house style (esp. Bachalo and Ramos) that seems popular nowadays (Cheung, Coipel, Immonen, Tan, Mann, Medina), and I really enjoy that. That is not to say I don’t like the current house style, I really do, but with Bachalo, Ramos, and Yu (and Ferry), I feel, right or wrong, like I’m getting something in addition to a rendering of what the writer calls for.

On the DC side, I enjoy Frazer irving, Francis Manapul, and Frank Quitely, among others, for exactly these reasons.

Ramos is a GREAT artist… but the fact that you also don’t look Bachalo (who is even better) and Yu (who waffles a bit, but is sometimes brilliant), tells me it is a taste issue.

This isn’t a dig. I remember well picking up New Mutants back in the day and going “WTF is THIS crap!” Bill Sienkiewicz scribbling and dumping his ink bottle on the page. “Give me Bob Hall!” I thought.

Now I look at Sienkiewicz’s New Mutants and call it brilliant.

Tastes change.

Ed (A Different One)

April 20, 2011 at 6:40 am

Yeah – I remember the days when McFarlane was King of the Comics World. Honestly I never took to his art, at least with Spidey. I know he was groundbreaking at the time, and the Marvel “House Style” probably did need shaking up at the time, but he was just never my cup of tea. That being said, I can’t argue with the guy’s success, he’s probably one of the few people able to become a “millionaire” in this business since Stan Lee (who, coincidentally, seems to be making a ton of appearances with Todd lately – sign of the apocolypse?). Still, look at Spidey’s legs in that last panel above and see how they compare to the rest of his body. There are fullbacks in the NFL who don’t have tree-trunk legs like that – and this on a character who is supposed to be “skinny and lean” at best.

I “like” Ramos’s art, as long as he tones down the Manga-esque influences in his Spidey work (his current work on ASM is much better in the regard than the Spidey work he did earlier this decade). That being said, much like Bacchalo (whom I also “like”) I have a hell of a hard time following his action scenes (actually, that’s a problem I have more with Bacchalo, but it exists with Ramos as well). If there is something he can do to make his action scenes more “fluid” and “coherent”, I think he’d be a giant in the field.

And Bagley – there’s times his work looks awesome, and times where it’s not so much. I think his work on the original Thunderbolts series and what he’s done on Ultimate Spider-Man is top notch. Then I look at what he did for JLA recently and . . . not so much. Now he’s back on USM and looking great again. Maybe he’s just one of those pencilers whose work is really affected by the type of inker on the book (I know, duh, whose pencils aren’t ultimately subject to the quality of the inking job – but Bagley’s work just seems more succeptible to it for some reason . . . )

I’m not too into how Leinil Francis Yu draws faces. They all look like dessicated corpses to me (even Spider-Man in that Secret Invasion sample page, but especially Fury, Thor and Cap in that bottom panel).

Mark Bagley was my absolute favorite artist back when he was doing New Warriors and Amazing Spider-Man in the 90s when I was a teenager. I also really liked his work when he started doing Ultimate Spider-Man when I was in my early 20s. Now, in my mid-30s, I look at his stuff and think, “eh, pretty cool, not great, some significant weaknesses” – I wonder if it is the context of the times, a general change in my sense of aesthetics, or if my taste has improved as I’ve gotten older?

I find it amusing that Todd McFarlane ranked #76. I wonder if we ranked writers and artists by money made, where he would end up on the list? Not that I think that speaks to his talent one way or the other – more of just an interesting aside.

was wondering when mark Bagley and Adam Kubert would pop up on the list. Todd another i would think would not show up till way in the top ten or so.

When McFarlane started drawing Spider-Man, I remember thinking as a kid that Peter must be wasting a fortune on webbing. I also remember my father complaining about McFarlane’s thin, incoherent panels and overall layout in the Torment storyline and how he just couldn’t follow it.

There’s nobody I’m particularly fond of in this batch but nobody whose art actively bugs me either–except McFarlane, of course.

Pete Woodhouse

April 20, 2011 at 8:01 am

McFarlane was advantageous over Ad Kubert by just one point (someone had to say it!).
Agreed, if this poll had been taken 20 years ago McFarlane would’ve been top 5.
Only Jim Lee of the Image guys popped up already? To be honest, I think that will be it.

and this on a character who is supposed to be “skinny and lean” at best.

This is one of those things people say over and over recently until they just take it as a truth and don’t question it. The “skinny and lean” Spidey thing who is smaller than other superheroes is a recent development that people try to now say was always the case. But go back to Ditko and Romita, and you’ll see Spider-Man has an average superhero physique. Not as big as Captain America or Thor, but definitely bigger than the average human, and the same size as Daredevil, the Human Torch, Quicksilver or Cyclops.

Scrawny Spider-Man is a recent development that I think started with Mark Bagley. I remember when even Romita did an interview in the 90s and he said he’s amazed that people can read Bagley’s super-skinny Spidey with the small ankles and wrists and still accept that as Spider-Man. So it’s straight from the horse’s mouth that skinny Spidey is not the traditional one.

Some old Ditko Spidey:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_AG0NMLjCoX4/TUIRpAG4v8I/AAAAAAAAJig/zZpKynXPFX4/s1600/Spider-Man25.jpg

http://spiderfan.org/comics/images/spiderman_amazing_annual/002.jpg

Also, how Ditko and Romita drew Spider-Man relative to Daredevil. Neither drew him especially smaller than Daredevil. He was average superhero male size:

http://www.platformnation.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Daredevil-16.jpg

http://www.spidervillain.com/SpiderManCovers/Amazing/ASM16/ASM16.htm

Oh, and probably the most famous example of all:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_IpV86ZyXqlA/SjO_vQcC1rI/AAAAAAAAAYw/wK9s4mbdPw0/s1600-h/spiderman-di-steve-ditko.gif

That is not a skinny Spider-Man. Sure Ditko may have drawn him really skinny when he first started, but at that time Ditko drew EVERYONE skinnier so in relative terms his Spider-Man still wasn’t skinnier than average.

Ed (A Different One)

April 20, 2011 at 8:19 am

@T

“That is not a skinny Spider-Man. Sure Ditko may have drawn him really skinny when he first started, but at that time Ditko drew EVERYONE skinnier so in relative terms his Spider-Man still wasn’t skinnier than average.”

Oh, no doubt, Spidey’s relative “girth” has fluctuated over the years, even with his original artist (Ditko), and then probably even more so into the Romita years. Even with the Ditko panel at your link, though, his legs are drawn in reasonable proportion to his body. The legs on the McFarlane panel above just really jumped out at me as being some big major ham-hocks that I’ve never seen Spidey saddled with before.

Ed (A Different One)

April 20, 2011 at 8:23 am

Oh – and when I described Spidey as being “skiny & lean at best” in my original post, i probably over-generalized a bit. While I agree that his physique has fluctuated over the years, I think most people picture Spidey as a relative “lean” figure, especially in comparison to other superheros. I think the most muscular I’ve ever seen him drawn was both JRjr or Sal Buscema, but even in those poses he would tend to the relatively “lean” end of the spectrum (for superheros mind you – not us regular folks).

My overall point, though, was that I don’t think his physique would have ever supported those legs in the McFarlane panel.

My overall point, though, was that I don’t think his physique would have ever supported those legs in the McFarlane panel.

Yeah, true, I agree with that. Sadly in the 90s, such atrocities were common, especially among the Image guys like McFarlane and Liefeld. Look at Stephen Platt’s Moon Knight sample in Greg Burgas’s recent post if you really want to see some tree trunk legs! It’s kinda comical!

http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/2011/04/18/taking-no-chances-mainstream-superhero-comics-need-a-kick-in-the-butt/

Ed (A Different One)

April 20, 2011 at 8:53 am

@T

OMG – those gams on MK make McFarlane’s Spidey legs lean by comparison. And that’s just the tip of the iceburg of where we could go on those panels.

I skimmed through that post very quickly the other day and didn’t give many of the panels a close look. I’ll have to go back when I have some time to soak it all in. There looks to be some fertile ground for commentary with some of those samples.

Hmm, not really anyone I like in this batch. Could be the first time.

In agreement with others here — not my favorite set, to say the least.

Yu and Kubert are hit-or-miss for me (sometimes great, sometimes not), but the others are not my cup of tea. Bagley’s just okay, but at least he’s fast and consistent. I’ve seen very little McFarlane stuff and haven’t been interested enough to seek it out. Ramos is one of my least favorite artists in comics. I strongly dislike his style.

Not my favorite batch too.

Interesting that all five of these guys fall in the category of “Would have placed a lot higher ten years ago.”

I am genuinely surprised that Bagley and Kubert didn’t make the top 50, because I don’t think they were ever hot artists of the moment the way others have been. Both Bagley and Kubert are total pros who have a huge body of work with a ton of quality, and real storytelling ability. In particular, that Kubert sample page is from what I think is the best Wolverine story in ten years- I urge everyone to check it out.

Yu I like, but I think he mails stuff in WAY too often. When we get his best effort, his stuff is great. But I really think that well more than half his stuff is not even close to his best effort. I remember when he first got noticed on Wolverine: Not Dead Yet, the art quality dropped dramatically from part 1 to part 4.

As for Ramos, he was a beneficiary of The Perfect Project. Anyone that read and loved Impulse during its first two years knows there is NO ONE that could have drawn that book better than he did. It’s a bit like We3 to me… I’m not the biggest Quitely fan, but I fully acknowledge no one could have handled that particular story better than he did. I agree with a lot of posters that I don’t typically enjoy Ramos’ stuff, and on most things he does, it just sort of seems like he’s the wrong guy for the book. But on Impulse… there’s simply no way it could have been better. The book lasted another 5+ years after Ramos left, and still every artist that drew the title tried to do it like Ramos had. As though nobody could conceive of the title with a different style.

And McFarlane… not much I can say that hasn’t already been said. Love him or hate him, he certainly deserves to be on the list. Though I’m pleased his placement is relatively disappointing.

I can just imagine Tim Callahan grinding his teeth at the inclusion of Mark Bagley on the list.

I agree with everyone who’s saying Bachalo and Ramos are hard to follow. I’ve always liked both of their visual styles, but there’s always so much going on it’s hard to tell what exactly IS going on. Especially with Bachalo. Steampunk is something I wanted to read for a long time and finally got in TBP form recently (at the Kandahar Airfield Canadian Shopette, no less), and I’ve found that I just couldn’t finish it. There are so many cool things on each page, so many plumes of steam coming from all the insane, convoluted machines, that I had trouble figuring out what the fuck is happening in the story.

Humberto Ramos isn’t quite so bad, I actually really liked his work on Crimson back when I read books like that. That book had so much potential that just didn’t pan out. It felt rushed, and that may have affected Ramos’ art as well. I think if the story had been decompressed across at least four more volumes it could have been something great. Instead, it was just like – “Vampires…and now Werewolves and ancient fallen angels and other angels and Templars, wait now the Templars are dead except for thug Templars with dragon tattoos – wait that dude is killing angels for their blood? And Lucifer is all in white and OH GOD WHAT IS HAPPENING I CAN’T FOLLOW THE STORY!”

Joe H, hilarious comment

Ed (A Different One)

April 20, 2011 at 11:03 am

@Roselli

“Vampires…and now Werewolves and ancient fallen angels and other angels and Templars, wait now the Templars are dead except for thug Templars with dragon tattoos – wait that dude is killing angels for their blood? And Lucifer is all in white and OH GOD WHAT IS HAPPENING I CAN’T FOLLOW THE STORY!”

HA, HA, HA, HA, HA, HA . . . well said! While I haven’t read this story, I know I’ve felt that way about other storylines but could never sum it up quite as well as you did.

Sounds like a good candidate for a future Cronin blog entry – Top Ten Storylines That Lead You Into the Swamp and Strand You There.

Ok, I like McFarlane Spidey. There. I was never a fanboy but his style is interesting and he did some great stuff with panel layout. I’m not too fond of the way he drew regular people but funny-suits-people are fine and he was the one to realize the potential how Spidey the character could be drawn, all crazy angles and ropes of webbing.
Yes, McFarlane Spidey (the character) still looks better than Spidey by Ditko, Romita or whoever.
Shame about the later stuff, it would have been great to see where he would have gone with a good writer and editor.

Otherwise, Bagley and Kubert are sort of artists who are pleasing when the writing is good but I can’t muster enthusiasm about them, the other two I haven’t read and the sample pages me me go “meh”.

It is true that what I found so eye-bleedingly horrible about McFarlane’s Spider-Man when it first came out was his writing much more than his art, which was at least kind of eye-catching. But there was just something so brain-damaged about the scripting that when I picked up the first issue, I thought, “Why on earth did they let this guy write the comic as well as draw it? Did he have compromising photos of Jim Salicrup or something?”

I loved Ramos on Impulse. He captured the whimsy and the drama perfectly.

Then, he did DV8. I couldn’t think of an artist worse-suited to Warren Ellis’s dark, cynical scripts. Everything looked distorted, and not in a way that fit the material. Ramos lost me at that point, and I haven’t read anything by him since that I’ve warmed to. He’s okay sometimes, but that’s it.

Adam Kubert’s first run on Incredible Hulk made me a fan. I would love to see the Kubert/ Farmer team tackle another series.

Ed (A Different One)

April 20, 2011 at 11:57 am

@AS

Never meant to insinuate that there’s any shame in liking McFarlane’s Spidey. God knows enough people have over the years, otherwise he wouldn’t be the success he is. He’s not my cup of tea, but I too realize how he did something necessary by blowing up the “house style” at the time. He was an innovator, if nothing else.

Never my intention to render judgement against folks who might like his stuff. God knows I like enough things that most people find goofy . . .

Hello, my name is Mike Loughlin… and I used to like McFarlane’s Spider-Man. It’s been 3 years since I searched through my long boxes for the sideways X-Force crossover…

“Why on earth did they let this guy write the comic as well as draw it? Did he have compromising photos of Jim Salicrup or something?”

His Spider-Man art accompanied David Michilinie writing before it accompanied his own writing, so it wasn’t really like it was a big downward drop in quality. I found both writers equally bad, just in different ways.

As for Ramos, he was a beneficiary of The Perfect Project. Anyone that read and loved Impulse during its first two years knows there is NO ONE that could have drawn that book better than he did. It’s a bit like We3 to me… I’m not the biggest Quitely fan, but I fully acknowledge no one could have handled that particular story better than he did. I agree with a lot of posters that I don’t typically enjoy Ramos’ stuff, and on most things he does, it just sort of seems like he’s the wrong guy for the book. But on Impulse… there’s simply no way it could have been better. The book lasted another 5+ years after Ramos left, and still every artist that drew the title tried to do it like Ramos had. As though nobody could conceive of the title with a different style.

Let’s also keep in mind though that it wasn’t just the perfect project, but the fact he had a very different style also. Impulse with modern Ramos art to me would not be that good.

I LOVE Ramos’ art… there. Somebody has to stick up for him because he’s getting killed in the comments. I think Ramos, along with Joe Mad, found the perfect balance between american comics and manga.

Dunno why Judah Maccabee is dressed as Wolverine in that Ramos scan, but it’s nice to see him again.

On a semi-unrelated note, as dumb as I thought Secret Invasion was (and Civil War, and Dark Reign…), I did enjoy the “my god has a hammer” line.

For those of you who do like Yu’s and Ramos’ work (and Bachalo’s, though he’s off-topic and it’s all my fault), can you tell me what I’m missing? I’d love to see why they’re popular and gain an appreciation.

Ok, just a nitpick here. As a big manga fan, let me be the first to say that I do not see much manga in Ramos work at all. I think American fans who don’t know much about manga outside of the stereotypes of big eyes and cartoony exaggeration tend to lump anyone who’s not into hyperrealism as manga-inspired. But Ramos to my eye isn’t. Madureira on the other hand definitely is. I can even see in some pictures which anime and manga he’s lifting from, like an X-Men issue where he used a character directly lifted from Ninja Scroll.

Just to be sure, i did a search on Google and found an interview with Ramos where he himself said he’s not influenced at all by manga:

JOZIC: You have a very unique style and I don’t believe I’ve ever heard or read who your influences are. Is there any one, or a number of people, who have played a role in how your style has developed?

RAMOS: My master was Art Adams, he made decide to join this world. So, if you want to blame somebody, he is the one. Now, most of my influence comes from my dear friend Carlos Meglia, he is the greatest. Also, I can´t forget the major crush I have on Mr. [Jason] Pearson´s art. Thanks guys, I owe you!!

JOZIC: Are there any influences on your work (writing and art) from outside the comic book industry?

RAMOS: Movies of course.

JOZIC: Ever since you first broke into comics I’ve heard your art style referred to, sometimes critically, as Amerimanga, or very Japanese influenced. Coming from Mexico, do you find this amusing, or has Manga played a role in the development of your style?

RAMOS: Not at all, my work as I said before was most influenced by the American artists, so I am more comfortable (if somebody is) with the “cartoony” label. That´s it.

http://www.comicsbulletin.com/features/106747367359804.htm

Yeah, the late Carlos Meglia clearly had a GIGANTIC influence on Ramos’ change in style over the years.

Ramos’s work is high energy, and it’s outside the norm. As T. notes, it’s also really cartoony. It’s fun.

Ramos has done a lot of work over the years that I’m not a huge fan of, but when he’s a bit more restrained (see that Avengers piece at the top) he’s pretty great. I’d rather see 100 guys like Ramos on the list than some of the more traditional/boring artists.

Bachalo is the same, though he’s always struck me as a bit more experimental and I think you can see stronger manga influences in his art (wiki tells me the connection is to Madureira).

I can understand people not liking their art, but given the level of craft that goes into it for both of them it’s pretty bad form to question their inclusion on the list. Especially given that this is a list of people’s favorite artists. There are others that I’d certainly like to see higher on the list, and artists that won’t be featured that I wish would be, but so far this has been pretty diverse in terms of styles. Just in today’s entries we’ve got five very different artists.

Also: everyone should google Carlos Meglia. Wasn’t familiar with his work until Brian and T. brought it up but there are very clear connections between his work and Ramos’s.

Does anyone know if their style is more common in Latin America? Have to admit, I know nothing about comics from south of the US border.

I put Bachalo as my #1 favorite artist. I really don’t understand the complaints about his work being hard to follow at all. Yeah, it’s crammed full of stuff, but more often than not, it’s the important parts that pop out from the chaos. Granted, his earlier work, when he developed his new style was a bit harder, but I chalk that up to growing pains and figuring out what he could and couldn’t get away with, and now people just don’t try very hard to figure out his new stuff because “Oh, it’s Bachalo, it must be difficult to follow.”

Joe H, sooooo happy to read that Bachalo’s your #1 artist – MINE TOO!!! He’s the ONLY artist I buy, no questions asked, I wouldn’t care if a third grader was writing him, or he was drawing 100 pages of toilet paper roll studies. Marvel and DC put out art books of guys, it’s criminal they don’t have a Bachalo book out, especially Marvel. I fell in love with his art during Generation Next, AoA and haven’t stopped following him since. His newer cleaner style is cool to see how’s he’s changed stuff up, but I love it all.

Ramos has done a lot of work over the years that I’m not a huge fan of, but when he’s a bit more restrained (see that Avengers piece at the top) he’s pretty great.

Yes, when he’s restrained he’s a much better artist, and thankfully he seems to be moving back in the direction of being more restrained in the new Spider-Man art I’ve seen from him. It was the most I liked his art since his Impulse days, which I loved. I look forward to his new work.

Does anyone know if their style is more common in Latin America? Have to admit, I know nothing about comics from south of the US border.

Good question. The only other Mexican artist I can think of offhand is Carlo Barberi, who does indeed draw in a similar “cartoony” (I kinda hate that word but can’t think of a better one) style. So there may be something to your theory.

I run hot and cold on Ramos and Yu.

Bagley and Kubert are so ordinary I can’t see why anyone cares either way.

McFarlane is the one 90s Image style artist who’s work I like. He’s just got that bit of life to his work that Jim Lee’s work is completely lacking (though Lee came close on ASBAR).

Ed (A Different One)

April 21, 2011 at 6:59 am

@Joe H

“I put Bachalo as my #1 favorite artist. I really don’t understand the complaints about his work being hard to follow at all. Yeah, it’s crammed full of stuff, but more often than not, it’s the important parts that pop out from the chaos. Granted, his earlier work, when he developed his new style was a bit harder, but I chalk that up to growing pains and figuring out what he could and couldn’t get away with, and now people just don’t try very hard to figure out his new stuff because “Oh, it’s Bachalo, it must be difficult to follow.”

No – I really, really ,really have tried to follow some of his action sequences and really was left wondering what the hell was going on. While I don’t have the actual issues right in front of me, the example most recent in my memory is the SHED arc he did last year on ASM. More than once i was left wondering what the hell was going on in some of those panels.

And, again, I tend to “like” Bacchalo. His images are interesting to look at and I like his take on some of those classic characters (his Lizard absolutely kills). And his cover on one of those SHED issues is a classic in my opinion (the one where Spidey is wrapped up in the Lizard’s tail, and the viewer’s perspective is peering out from the Lizard’s mouth). I also thought that his one sequence in the “Mayan” arc in ASM not long after BND was brilliant too – where the “Mayan God” attacks Spidey across different panels due to his ability to reach across time & space. But in as many ways as he “wows” me, he can leave me frustrated when I can’t figure out what the hell is going on as Spidey engages the Lizard in battle.

I’m not saying Bacchalo is a bad artist. And I’m not saying he shouldn’t be included on this list (which I’m sure he will be in coming installments) – I just think that the criticism that some people have re: his action sequences being hard to follow is a valid one.

I agree with Ed. I’m a big Bachalo fan and think his pros outweigh his cons, but the idea that complaints about his action sequences are just examples of bandwagon jumping rather than valid complaints is simply untrue. I’ve had trouble with his storytelling for a while now.

I honestly have never had any trouble following any sequences of his since I got back into comics five years ago, so I really don’t get the complaint at all. I just can’t understand it. Sorry if I insinuated that you guys were dishonest about it, but I just can’t relate.

I think a lot of people that question Bachalo need to check out his early Vertigo stuff, particularly the first Death miniseries and Shade: The Changing Man issues in the 30s and 40s.

Some examples…

http://www.comicartfans.com/GalleryPiece.asp?Piece=428693&GSub=67187

http://www.comicartfans.com/GalleryPiece.asp?Piece=178650&GSub=21676

http://www.comicartfans.com/GalleryPiece.asp?Piece=454286&GSub=71322

This is the best lot so far – Bar Bagley, all top 20ers for me.

Top 5 for Todd.

Yu has the right mix of Travis Charest and Whilce Portacio. Ramos is super-kinetic (though I’ll admit I preferred his work circa-Crimson to his more recent stuff) and Todd is Todd. Challenging the conventions, breaking the “rules” from way back in his 80s Infinity Inc. days.

More artists like these (and Platt too) and less of the faux-to-realistic house style, Marvel.

Ed (A Different One)

April 22, 2011 at 5:15 am

@Joe H

“I honestly have never had any trouble following any sequences of his since I got back into comics five years ago, so I really don’t get the complaint at all. I just can’t understand it. Sorry if I insinuated that you guys were dishonest about it, but I just can’t relate.”

No – i was probably just over-vigorous in my response. It’s one of those issues I get a little worked up about because, other than that criticism, I love Bacchalo as an artist and I guess I find it frustrating all the more for that reason. Didn’t at all mean to wail on you there if that’s how I came across.

I’ve also considered that maybe the resson I can’t follow his action sequences is some deficiency on my end – and actually felt that to be the case for a while. But, man, after trying so hard to follow him and then seeing similar cristiisms about him from other people . . .

Seeing people like Bagley and McFarlane this high up, reminds me that we this is based upon people’s top ten only. If it were people’s top twenty, they (and other artists) probably would have been significantly higher because they would have been present on many more lists.

I’m old skool, so McFarlane is way up my list. And I suspect Kubert is higher on my list (than this one) because of the same reason many “big names” will wind up lower.

If you like the series (can’t think of the plural) the artist was part of, you’ll probably vote the artist higher. If you don’t like the series, you’ll probably vote the artist lower. It’s hard to seperate images and overall content (and it’s hard for a cinematographer to get props on a bad movie).

On Bachalo, I’d also suggest trying his early Vertigo and pre-Vertigo stuff. His work on Shade was amazing.

Leave a Comment

 

Categories

Review Copies

Comics Should Be Good accepts review copies. Anything sent to us will (for better or for worse) end up reviewed on the blog. See where to send the review copies.

Browse the Archives