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CSBG Archive

When We First Met #5

Each day in June you’ll get an entry showing you the first appearance of seemingly minor characters, phrases, objects or events that later became notable parts of comic book lore. Not major stuff like “the first appearance of Superman,” but rather, “the first time someone said, ‘Avengers Assemble!’” or “the first appearance of Batman’s giant penny” or “the first appearance of Alfred Pennyworth” or “the first time Spider-Man’s face was shown half-Spidey/half-Peter.” Stuff like that. Here is an archive of what I’ve featured so far.

Enjoy!

First Appearance of S.T.A.R. Labs

As per commenter Dominic’s request, let’s take a look at December 1971′s Superman #246, where writer Len Wein and artists Curt Swan and Murphy Anderson first took us to S.T.A.R. Labs…


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First time Wolverine made the “snikt!” noise with his claws

“Snikt!” must be one of the most famous sound effects in comic book history.

When Wolverine first showed up, his claws did not pop out (they might have been designed to do so, but they did not actually ever do so in the issue).

So it was in his second full appearance, in 1975′s Giant Size X-Men #1, that Wolverine both first “popped a claw” and we first saw that oh so special sound effect…


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First time Bruce Wayne was referred to as a billionaire

Surprisingly enough, it was not until June 1994′s Legends of the Dark Knight #61 (written by Denny O’Neil) that Bruce Wayne was first referred to as a billionaire, as opposed to a multi-millionaire (as he was typically referred).

“Only” seventeen years ago!

28 Comments

In all fairness, it may only be seventeen years ago when being a “multimillionaire” stopped counting as “rich enough.”

Taylor Porter

June 4, 2011 at 4:01 am

Brian, having just seen X-Men First Class, I was wondering about something that I thought you might be able to answer in this column.

When was it first revealed that Xavier and Magneto had a history as friends? It’s been a while, but I don’t think it was in X-Men #1. I remember X-Men #161 showed their friendship and first meeting of Gabrielle Haller, but it seems that it must have been brought up before that. Any thoughts? Possible subject for later?

I am nearly certain that it was in the original X-Men Graphic Novel. The same one that revealed that Xavier calls Magneto “Magnus” and that, well, Magneto has delusions of nobility.

Ironically, that GN is no longer in continuity, although obviously something much along the same lines did happen in continuity.

Huh, I had always assumed that S.T.A.R. Labs had come out of the Flash book for some reason.

Uh, Luis, where’d you hear that God Lives, Man Kills is no longer in continuity? As far as I can tell, it very much is.

X-Men OGN that isn’t in continuity? What are you talking about? I’m one of the biggest X-Fans around and the only OGNs I can think of were The New Mutants and GLMK, both of which are definitely in continuity.

I think that Uncanny #161 predated both the New Mutants and God Loves. It was dated September ’82.

I think thwip is more famous than snikt, and possibly bamf as well.

I’ve noticed that pretty much all the comic-book millionaires have become billionaires now.

It’s been a while, but I remember mentions of the difficulty of making it fit with the chronology (it has both Kitty as Ariel in the green costume and Scott as an active X-Man).

Sorry for not having more specific info.

Mary beat me to it. Uncanny X-Men #161, published about five months before God Loves. It has the first meeting between Xavier and Magneto, when both were working as volunteers in Israel. I think the issue also introduces Gabrielle Haller, mother of Xavier’s son.

God Loves, Man Kills had a sort of “very special episode” vibe in the 1980s. Not in a bad way. It felt to me like not-quite-canon, though not as obviously as the Marvel/DC crossovers. The story was never referenced in any other comic in Claremont’s 17 years as top X-creator. And that was unusual, given how much continuity there was in Claremont comics.

But I think it finally became undeniably canon when Claremont returned to the X-books and started using Reverend Stryker again.

always thought star labs either started out in flash or green lantern. or another part of gotham city. nice to finaly learn where star labs first shows up in the dc universe. .

I think thwip is more famous than snikt, and possibly bamf as well.

Snikt had its own comic book series.

So, yeah, Snikt is the winner.

Travis Pelkie

June 4, 2011 at 10:25 pm

Hey, bamf had a city in Canada named after it!

Oh, wait, that’s Banff, Alberta. Sorry.

Yeah, I’d say snikt would be the winner, even without the mini.

I never knew there was a Snikt series. Hasn’t Wolverine had enough series already?

@Luis Dantas: That’s not a continuity problem of any kind.

Kitty Pryde switched tfrom her intiial codename “Sprite” to the codename “Ariel” sometime around Uncanny X-Men #171 (it happened in Marvel Graphic Novel #5, published aroudnt he same time, and she started wearing the Ariel costume in Uncanny in #1717 — no one really seemed to call her anything but Kitty, however.)

Though Cyclos had left to stay with Madelyne Pryor, he rejoined the X-Men around Uncanny X-Men #172 because of Mastermind’s manipulations. Kitty wasn’t called “Shadowcat” until 1985′s Kitty Pryde and Wolverine #6, published contemporaneously with Uncanny X-Men #211.

I suspect that reprint schedules have muddied the issue and led to various misconceptions, especially since none of Kitty’s codenames before “Shadowcvat” seemed to catch on or even be spoken in dialogue that often.

Each of Wolverine’s claws should get its own series.

What about homo superior,

As I recall, for a long time S.T.A.R. Labs mostly appeared in Superman books. Way back when the New Teen Titans debuted, I remember thinking that it was a nice touch that S.T.A.R. was a key part of a story that had nothing to do with Superman.

Later, of course, they were all over the place.

I know “snikt” and “bamf” (and while I love Nightcrawler more than Wolverine, I agree “snikt” is the most famous) … but what’s “thwip”?

The sound Spider-Man’s web shooters make.

the lead bad guy in that LOTDK page looks a lot like Cain from House of Mystery without his beard (and most of his hair).

I’d long since dropped the book when that issue was out. Who’s the woman in the first panel? I thought “Glory Grant” but that’s too much of a crossover …

the lead bad guy in that LOTDK page looks a lot like Cain from House of Mystery without his beard (and most of his hair).

I’d long since dropped the book when that issue was out. Who’s the woman in the first panel? I thought “Glory Grant” but that’s too much of a crossover …

In all seriousness, you’re better off not knowing (but if you really want to know, she was a short-lived love interest for Bruce back when his back was broken by Bane who also, conveniently enough, turned out to have healing powers that fixed Bruce’s back – yes, it was as bad as it sounds).

Who drew the art in the snikt and billionaire scans? It looks like John Byrne and Ron Wagner, respectively, but I’m not sure.

Cockrum for the former, Eduardo Barreto for the latter.

Jesse Farrell

June 6, 2011 at 4:09 pm

I know we’re talking comics and not other media, but was Bruce Wayne ever refered to as a billionaire on the animated series? I’m amazed the switchover from millionaire to billionaire was during my time reading Batman comics and I never caught it.

He probably is in the cartoon, because I’m almost certain he is in Burton’s ‘Batman’.

Bruce is never referred to as a billionaire in Burton’s Batman. In fact, he is not even referred to as a Millionaire! It is just clear that he is very wealthy.

Wow, that Superman art by Curt Swan and Murphy Anderson is gorgeous.

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