web stats

CSBG Archive

When We First Met #6

Each day in June you’ll get an entry showing you the first appearance of seemingly minor characters, phrases, objects or events that later became notable parts of comic book lore. Not major stuff like “the first appearance of Superman,” but rather, “the first time someone said, ‘Avengers Assemble!’” or “the first appearance of Batman’s giant penny” or “the first appearance of Alfred Pennyworth” or “the first time Spider-Man’s face was shown half-Spidey/half-Peter.” Stuff like that. Here is an archive of what I’ve featured so far.

Enjoy!

First Appearance of the Daily Bugle

Interestingly enough, the Bugle first appeared in 1962′s Fantastic Four #2…

As for the actual offices of the Bugle, we did not actually see them until Amazing Spider-Man #4!

You see, in #2, we see J. Jonah Jameson’s office, but it is for Now Magazine, not the Bugle.

In fact, Peter’s first gig as a photographer for Jameson was for Now Magazine, not the Daily Bugle.

In 1963′s #4, though, we see Spidey visit the Daily Bugle’s offices (they’re likely the same building, just with a different name on the front of it – a retcon, as it were)…


_________________________________________________________________________________

First Appearance of Arkham Asylum (along with first super-villain to escape)

In 1974′s Batman #258, Denny O’Neil introduced Arkham Asylum (a little nod to the fictional city where a lot of H.P. Lovecraft’s stories took place). The issue also featured the first member of Batman’s Rogues Gallery to escape from the institution…Two-Face!


_________________________________________________________________________________

First person other than Thor or Odin to lift Thor’s hammer

This one is a bit of a trick question, as the answer is the Hulk, but only because Thor had Odin lift the magical properties of the hammer in 1965′s Journey Into Mystery #112….

The first person other than Thor or Odin to lift the hammer because they were “worthy,” was, as you would expect, Beta Ray Bill in 1983′s Thor #337…


_________________________________________________________________________________

Feel free to send in ideas for future debuts I should feature here to bcronin@comicbookresources.com!

19 Comments

What about the first fastball special?

Who drew that issue in which Two-Face escapes? Was it Aparo?

Matthew: That story was drawn by Irv Novick and Dick Giordano.

Wow, I read that Two-Face story, but I had no idea that Arkham wasn’t an established part of the Batman mythos until that late. Very cool.

I love how fully formed JJJ’s persona was so early on in his history:

“I want our entire next issue devoted to the Vulture! The whole thing! But also include a lot of stories about Spider-Man!”

“But, Mr. Jameson, I don’t think that’s–”

“Just do it! Or I’ll find some editors that will!”

Also, without reading the rest of the issue, I can only assume that the “little souvenir” Spidey left for Jonah was a big, steaming poo on his desk chair.

How very appropriate that in the very first appearance of Arkham Asylum, someone is escaping from it. The security in that joint is a total joke. The authorities in Gotham would have had better luck keeping Batman’s rogues gallery imprisoned by putting them in prison cells with screen doors.

Travis Pelkie

June 5, 2011 at 6:37 pm

Yay, Arkham! I didn’t realize the name was a nod to Lovecraft, very cool.

But why would Two-Face have the clean side of the coin come up to free the Joker? Or if the scarred side comes up, why the bit about “you’re a vicious murderer”?

And why didn’t he flip the coin to see if he’d go with the guys who are breaking him out?

I hear that when they recently rebuilt Arkham, they put at the entrance a revolving door. hee hee hee

That Fantastic Four panel also shows the first appearance of the Daily Globe, the Bugle’s longtime rival, where Peter Parker briefly worked around 1979-80.

Didn’t the Silver Surfer lift the hammer at some point too? Not saying he was first, but didn’t he?
Also, it really bugs me when Stan refers to it as a “mallet”.

Mallet– from the Latin, Malleus, meaning ‘hammer’.

Red Norvell doesn’t count as a hammer-lifter?

There are also various Golden Age references to the Daily Bugle, like Miss America#4.

It’s a very nitpicky thing and I don’t expect that it bothers many people. Yes, I see that “mallet” or “maul’ are words related to “hammer”, but I think hammer is the larger class of objects, as in all mallets are hammers but not all hammers are mallets.

As I see it, mallets are two-headed hammers (usually soft) used to drive pegs with in carpentry or wedges to split logs in the case of mauls, where a weapon like Mjolnir is a war hammer, as used to crush opponents and destroy armor. So, just because it has a double head that doesn’t mean it’s a mallet. But reading old Stan Lee, ya can’t nitpick too much or it’s no fun, right? Face front indeed.

J.Jonah Jameson’s “NOW MAGAZINE” did come back and was featured in a big way in DOCTOR STRANGE : SORCERER SUPREME # 9.

The issue’s cover is rendered to look like a NOW cover, since inside is a portion of an “expose’ book ” on Dr. Strange – written by his former lover; Morganna Blessing. Jameson published exclusive articles from the “book” and it was featured in the issue.

Quite cool, really.

Here’s the issue:
http://www.comics.org/issue/64970/cover/4/

~P~

Didn’t Captain America once lift the hammer long enough to hand it back to Thor?

NOW Magazine could be a section INSIDE the Daily Bugle. Lots of newspapers include weekly magazines like PARADE. The Washington Post includes a weekly magazine called WP. So JJJ could just be talking about the special feature still IN the Bugle.

Edgar Liberty

June 19, 2011 at 6:55 pm

Wow, I’m a little down in the mouth that they can’t do that Two-Face/Joker scene in the third flick. It would work so well with the hospital scene from The Dark Knight.

I like that, way back when, they actually knew that nobody calls them “asylum”s anymore in the US, but nowadays, it’s just “Arkham Asylum” more often than not.

Wait, so, pre-Crisis, Arkham Asylum was in New England? And, by extension, so was Gotham? I get that it’s a nod to Arkham, Massachusetts, where some of Lovecraft’s stories took place, but did Denny O’Neil just up and decide that Arkham and thus Gotham would be in that region? Or is that just a throwaway reference?

FS7- Gotham is canonically in New Jersey

Leave a Comment

 

Categories

Review Copies

Comics Should Be Good accepts review copies. Anything sent to us will (for better or for worse) end up reviewed on the blog. See where to send the review copies.

Browse the Archives