web stats

CSBG Archive

Comic Book Easter Eggs – My Name Is Earl in Hulk and The Office in Spider-Man!

All throughout July, I will be sharing with you three comic book “easter eggs” a day. An easter egg is a joke/visual gag/in-joke that a comic book creator (typically the artist) has hidden in the pages of the comic for readers to find (just like an easter egg). They range from the not-so-obscure to the really obscure. So come check ‘em all out and enjoy! Also, click here for an archive of all the easter eggs featured so far!

Reader Ryan B. e-mailed me two good suggestions…

Trans-Atlantic Visual Gag

In Marvel Knights: Spider-Man #1, Spider-Man is in such a rush to get to Aunt May’s new apartment after getting an emergency call that he doesn’t even bother changing into his costume. On the way there, he passes by a familiar looking office…the cast of the UK version of The Office…

Nicely turned by Terry Dodson. I wonder if writer Mark Millar had anything to do with it or if it was all Dodson?

Instant Karma

In World War Hulk: Frontline #4, Ramon Bachs draws some of the cast of My Name Is Earl in the crowd…

I like that Earl even has his famous list visible in his pocket. I wonder what he thought of karma when the Hulk and a bunch of aliens invaded Earth?

Truth in Advertising

In Swamp Thing #51, as John Constantine departs from the series (for a short period), he sails off in a boat with a very familiar name…

Thanks to David P. for suggesting this one via e-mail!

For whatever reason, the boat seems a bit hard to read, so here’s a detail of it…

If you can think of an easter egg/in-joke that you would like to see me feature, drop me a line at bcronin@comicbookresources.com! DON’T make suggestions in the comments section, so as to not spoil the surprise for when I end up actually featuring your suggestion.

NOTE: A word about suggestions. I’ve gotten so many (which is great – keep ‘em coming!) that I am going through them in the order that I receive them. So if you wonder why I did not credit you for a suggestion you sent in, it is because someone else sent it in first. No offense intended!

20 Comments

Travis Pelkie

July 16, 2011 at 3:33 am

Those first 2 are pretty neat, but that last one stings.

You should police the comments for bad puns like the one I just left.

If John gets lost at sea, he can throw out a message in a bottle.

Ok, I’ll stop now.

That last one, in Swamp thing is an egg with a double yolk. Acknowledgement of Constantine’s visual inspiration, and (more delightfully, IMO) a lovely and appropriate shout out to the old Pogo strips. Always loved that one.

Earl’s eyes are closed. That’s a nice touch.

Ah, I was going to point out the Pogo reference, but EGrant beat me to it.

And I was going to point out that Earl’s eyes are closed, but Dan beat me to that!

What does it matter that Earl’s eyes are closed? i never watched the show [but i know its premise] so i’m not getting the eyes closed thing. Thanks!

Another nod to the UK Office is actually seen even earlier in the issue during the Spidey-Goblin fight in the wee morning hours: no one is there, but a computer with the screensaver “Gareth is a Bennie” is visible on page 8 panel 3 as Spidey and the Goblin crash through the scene. There’s also a tiny image of Wally apparently cut from a Dilbert strip pinned to a cubicle wall just above the monitor in the earlier scene.

It can’t be the same office, however, since the room layout is very different and since it gets trashed in the fight. Hm!

Isn’t there a not-even-an-easter-egg reference to Pogo later in the run?

Sean: It was earlier in the run, but yes, very much so. Swamp Thing #32, “Pog,” was a heartbreaking tribute to Pogo & pals.

nice to see the office and earl ones appear on this list for thought it was a little bit of karma for earl to wind up being around with a pissed off hulk near by. plus glad i am not the only one who knows the double easter egg of the boat in swamp thing the reference to constines inspiration and it being a pogo referance also.

Years later in Swamp Thing, Doug Wheeler the Hack attempted a plodding sequel to Moore’s Pogo tribute — and butchered it! I call him that because of the interview of him I once read where he tried blaming his book’s inadequacy on the artist, Pat Broderick. Wheeler said something like “He made me look like a hack!” Broderick’s not my favorite either, he draws stiff figures with great details, but it’s just the height of ingraciousness to lash out at one’s artist like that.

He was writing Swampy at a rough period though, coming in to finish a storyline that DC Editorial didn’t like the original ending of (Claw of Elk Hound), but the biggest problem with the book was not Pat Broderick.

What does it matter that Earl’s eyes are closed? i never watched the show [but i know its premise] so i’m not getting the eyes closed thing. Thanks!

It was a running gag in the show that EVERY time Earl had his picture taken, his eyes were closed in the shot – family photos, police mug shots, his driver’s license… he always closed his eyes right before the camera clicked. So here he is again, shown in a static shot, and his eyes are closed as tightly as ever…

Kind of dumb for Peter Parker to be web-swinging without even pulling on his mask first. That would take, what, one second tops?

I remember a comic I read that mentioned the UK Office’s business name as someone’s school, but can’t think of it off the top of my head.

Kind of dumb for Peter Parker to be web-swinging without even pulling on his mask first. That would take, what, one second tops?

I presume what Millar was going for was that Peter was essentially in shock.

Unfortunately my eyes can’t make out the name of the boat. I think it’s the shades hittign my colour blindness.

@ yo go re:

Thanks so much! i never watched, as i said, but i knew of it & it seemed like it was a pretty funny show. Thanks again,

That Swamp Thing is like an Easter egg laying itself.

He was writing Swampy at a rough period though, coming in to finish a storyline that DC Editorial didn’t like the original ending of (Claw of Elk Hound), but the biggest problem with the book was not Pat Broderick.

You’ve got that right.

The biggest problems were Doug Wheeler first and Mike Hoffman second.

Maybe when he paddled off on the Gordon Sumner he felt “So Row-nely”

Leave a Comment

 

Categories

Review Copies

Comics Should Be Good accepts review copies. Anything sent to us will (for better or for worse) end up reviewed on the blog. See where to send the review copies.

Browse the Archives