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CSBG Archive

Cross-Hatchings For May 2012– FAQ Edition

No, not frequently-asked questions HERE, frequently-asked questions in my real life. Each time one comes up, I think, Hey, there’s a column, and then I sit down to do it and it’s really more of a column-ette. So here they all are together.

Here’s the one I’ve been getting a lot since That Big Movie came out…

Come on, you know which movie I mean.

And I bet you have too. Come on, say it with me:

“…So, was it like the comics?”

And I still have no real good answer for that question. My gut-feeling answer is, No, it’s BETTER.

Honestly, what it felt like in the theater was that we were watching a movie of the idea of the Avengers, the one we have all wished for, but don’t actually get all that often in the comics. Really it was a movie filled with a lot of FUCK YEAH! Avengers moments, a greatest-hits collection.

Not this moment SPECIFICALLY, but it had quite a few that FELT like this.

But that’s not really fair, because a lot of the good stuff in the movie did in fact come straight from the comics. I may not have cared for a lot of what was done to the Avengers idea in the comic book The Ultimates, but that didn’t mean Whedon and company weren’t cherry-picking the good stuff from that series for the movie. And other bits from the old Lee-Kirby days, the Thomas-Buscema years, and so on and so on.

Without spoiling anything for the four or five of you that haven’t seen it yet I will say that there’s something in the movie that I don’t ever recall being done in any comics series ever, and I absolutely adored it– the idea that it’s a better idea to recruit Bruce Banner than to capture and imprison him. That by itself was interesting, especially since it didn’t instantly go horribly wrong like it has every time the comics (or even the novels) flirted with the idea of having Banner come in from the cold.

In fact, this Hulk novel is the only time I can remember Banner being coaxed into government service during a time when he might still change to the Hulk. But I am not a Hulk continuity expert.

But that wasn’t the cool part. No, what I loved in the big-screen Avengers version of Bruce Banner was that this was a man that had come to terms with himself. With all the other characters in the movie, I could easily point to a comics version analogue. But this weary-but-not-defeated Banner, a guy who knows he has a ‘condition’ and is dealing with it like a grownup as best he can, was new to me and instantly became my favorite version of the character ever. As far as I can tell movie audiences love him too. Mark Ruffalo’s Bruce Banner, for me, stole as many scenes as the Hulk did later on (I especially loved Banner’s wryly-raised-eyebrow references to “the other guy,” as though even saying the Hulk’s name was a bad idea.)

Mark Ruffalo as the delightfully wry Bruce Banner... and the Other Guy.

A Banner that’s resigned to his condition and trying to make the best of it, that can be persuaded to contribute something but still trying to warn everyone what they might be letting themselves in for… a Banner that’s not a whiner. I really want to see that guy in my Avengers comics. Hell, I’d be happy to see that guy in my Marvel comics, period. Screw this Red Hulk noise. Let’s get cool Bruce Banner and grumpy childlike Hulk into the Avengers books, stat.

*

Another question I’m asked every other day lately is, “Are you reading The Shadow?” or “…The Spider?” or “…The Bionic Woman?” Or whatever other new comic is coming out based on an old character I’ve mentioned liking a lot.

Short answer? Yes.

Longer answer? (Oh, come on, you knew there’d be one.) Dynamite Comics, in particular, lately seems to be run by a bunch of people who all agreed that this year, they’re going to cater exclusively to my particular demographic. I’m looking at the roster of books they’ve launched in the last couple of years and it’s amazing how many of them have an early-to-mid-70s analogue.

Really, I could have kept going. Sure, some of these characters were revived or launched in comics earlier and later than the 1970s, but you look at the WHOLE roster and it's 1975 all over again.

Understand, I’m not complaining. But it does seem odd.

How could I complain? It looks as though someone there said, Hey, let's just license everything Greg Hatcher loved in the 7th grade. Of course, my 70s Spider was in prose, an effort to relaunch him as the Mack Bolan of the pulp era, but I think it still counts.

I’m not going to go through the whole line– for one thing, I’m not reading all of the revival titles (The various Vampirella and Red Sonja books aren’t really my thing; I did try one of the Red Sonja trade paperbacks but it was only on the low side of okay.) Anyway I talked about Dark Shadows here just a few weeks back. Yes, I am reading and enjoying The Shadow, but I can’t think of anything to add to what Greg Burgas says here except that it looks to me an awful lot like the old The Shadow Strikes! from DC, except with more cursing. That’s not a bad thing– I liked The Shadow Strikes! quite a bit when it was around and I don’t mind the occasional bad word as long as it’s not detracting from the period flavor.

The Bionic Man and The Bionic Woman both look promising, but since it’s only just now that they’re getting away from adapting the Kevin Smith screenplay and doing genuinely original stories, it’s early days really to be talking about where the books are headed. But I appreciate that they’re playing it relatively straight. These bionic books from Dynamite have about the same flavor and relationship to the original television shows that The Ultimates has to The Avengers, if you are wondering what the editorial approach is like. Whether that’s good or bad is a matter of personal taste, but I’m usually a pretty old-school guy and I’m liking these so far.

And really, when I saw THIS was going to be the book's first all-original arc, well, they owned me.

If I started on The Lone Ranger and how much I love what Dynamite is doing with the book, this column would balloon up to three times the size it is now. Suffice it to say that the relaunch, or “Volume Two” if you prefer, is every bit as good as what Matthews and Cariello were doing in the first volume. Ande Parks and Esteve Polls are consistently hitting it out of the park, the covers by Francesco Francavilla are a delight… AND it’s coming out on time. Plus there’s a Chuck Dixon miniseries on deck, and there’s no one better-suited for writing a tough-guy western. Overall, Dynamite Comics continues to give us the best version of the Lone Ranger anyone has ever done in any medium.

I heart this book so, so much. I confess that the foul language always pulls me up short, but I love that the Ranger HIMSELF scolds people about it. That is AWESOME.

But the real surprise for me was The Spider.

Now, this is a book I expected not to like at all –the only reason I even sampled it was because I knew people would ask me, particularly my student Troy in Young Authors. (I’d told him at one point that his detective stories read like something Norvell Page had done for the pulps, and so he went looking for Spider books. Now he’s a fan.)

Just FYI, if you want to read the original Spider pulps, the stories have been reprinted a number of times in mass-market paperback and you can usually pick them up for pennies.

I expected to dislike Dynamite’s new Spider book a lot because first, I hated the character design. I know they want to differentiate him visually from the Shadow. I get it. But to my mind the Moonstone look, combining the description Page himself gave of the Spider having the fangs and fright wig with the old pulp cover look of the domino mask and hat, was the best way to go. No one was going to mistake THAT guy for the Shadow.

Dynamite on the left, Moonstone on the right.

Secondly, they were going to further distance him from the Shadow by setting their version of the Spider in the present day. Comics have tried this with a number of pulp characters ranging from the Shadow to Doc Savage to the Green Lama, and it never works well.

But here is where this old-school pulp fan must bow to David Liss and company, because they absolutely got it right. The updated and redesigned Spider that premiered a couple of weeks ago from Dynamite is terrific. It instantly jumped to my personal #1 slot of comics I’m liking right now (well, okay, it’s tied with Daredevil and The Lone Ranger. But it’s really, really good.)

Yes, it's updated and modern. But it's still pulp to its core and it's AMAZING.

What I love about what David Liss and Colton Worley are doing with the Spider is the same thing I love about the BBC’s Sherlock– they found a way to bring everything forward into a contemporary setting by translating the original tropes into a modern-day equivalent.

The old Spider from the pulps was unique among the vigilante heroes because he was incredibly emotionally invested. Doc Savage and the Shadow fought crime because they were forces for good and that was what the good guys did. Richard Wentworth fought crime as the Spider because he couldn’t stand not to. For him it’s always personal.

Killing the bad guys--who are always horribnly, horribly evil-- and branding them on the forehead with the sign of the Spider, muttering about how they got off easy? Check.

Liss and Worley absolutely nail this. And all the other great old stuff is there as well, but almost always with the dust blown off it and given a great new angle.

Passionately in love with Nita Van Sloan, who knows Wentworth is the Spider? But Wentworth can't marry her because 'it woudn't be fair to her'? Check. Only this time Wentworth can't marry her because she's ALREADY MARRIED-- to the POLICE COMMISSIONER.

And the whole book is like that. I love how much thought Liss has clearly put into every single facet of the original pulp character, and how much he has retained from the originals.

Ram Singh, friend and confidante who is schooled in the mysterious ways of the Orient? Cops suspect Wentworth is the Spider but can't prove it? Check and check. But again with the great new spin: now Ram isn't a butler, he's a lawyer and civil rights advocate.

I don’t mean to slight the art of Colton Worley through all this. He turns in an extraordinary job here, dark but without ever looking muddy, and his faces are all wonderfully, subtly, expressive– his Nita clearly loves Richard but also is very aware of how wrong that is, and it’s every bit as much in her face as in the dialogue. Worley even makes that new Spider outfit mostly work, though I still don’t like it.

Best of all, are the Spider's adversaries so utterly awful that his homicidal vigilantism looks like the only sane reaction to it? HELL yeah. These guys were all in the pulps but Colton Worley has given them each a great new look. Check out the Cholera King... really, that guy LOOKS like a king of disease.

This may be the best Dynamite revival book yet. If purists are offended, well, they need to unclench, because I assure you that I’m pretty touchy about my pulp adaptations and I’m telling you, this is the best the character has looked in decades. Unlike, say, the clunky First Wave stuff DC tried a couple of years ago, this is an old pulp character updated for modern comics that still retains the feel of the original. The First Wave books often felt like they were about completely different characters with similar names to the 1940s versions. But that’s not what’s happening here. Just like the BBC Sherlock, Dynamite’s new Spider comic is really more of a pure expression of the idea of Richard Wentworth’s pulp adventures than it is an adaptation of what has come before.

Same thing I was saying about the Avengers movie, come to think of it. I guess this is where we came in.

*

A question that’s often showing up in my email of late is, “Did you get the book we sent?”

The somewhat embarrassing answer to that one is that yes, I did, I just haven’t had the chance to read and review it yet. So next week is the review roundup of all the stuff I’ve been getting from everyone. Promise. (I actually was going to put it here and then I saw that I’m already at 2200-plus words, so I decided to break it in half.)

So I’ll be back with those reviews… next week. See you then.

*

THIS JUST IN!
Forgot to mention earlier that the Cartooning Class, the Young Authors, and myself will have a table at the Olympia Comics Festival next weekend, Saturday June 2nd. Here is the swell poster I just got in my email in-box.

This is a great show and you should come see us if you're anywhere close.

The kids will have new books they are wrapping up this very week so we can exhibit them at the Expo, and there’ll be signing and sketching and all sorts of cool stuff. Come see us if you get a chance.

And everyone else, well, I’ll still be here next week… with the review pile. Promise.

25 Comments

Let me just say I’m so glad – for the most obvious reason – that your latest column is not yet another obituary.
Anyway, I’m one of the four or five who hasn’t yet seen Avengers, but in the past few weeks I have been catching up on all the lead-in movies I hadn’t yet seen (Iron Man 2, Thor, Captain America), and I completely understand your “it’s better” observation. All of these movies seem to distill the essence of what we all love about the characters in the comics and convey it in an entertaining package that can obviously appeal to a broader, non-comics reading audience. Needless to say, I’m really looking forward to seeing Avengers…

Mark Ruffalo just may have been the best thing in the Avengers film. I liked Norton’s version of Banner, and would have been happy to see that version in the Avengers, but Ruffalo’s portrayal is just so damned good. In my mind, this is *the* Bruce Banner that all other versions must be compared to.

I had passed on the Dynamite version of the Spider (despite loving Liss’s ‘Mystery Men’ mini-series), the previews did nothing to convince me that we needed another comic book version of the character, especially with Moonstone doing such a faithful (if somewhat sporadic) rendition of the Master Of Men. After reading your piece here, I think I’ll pick up the first issue and give it a chance.

random surfer

May 25, 2012 at 4:30 pm

“…something in the movie that I don’t ever recall being done in any comics series ever, and I absolutely adored it– the idea that it’s a better idea to recruit Bruce Banner than to capture and imprison him.”

Banner/Merged Hulk was recruited into the Pantheon. Does that count?

Travis Pelkie

May 25, 2012 at 4:53 pm

Yes Yes Yes on the Spider! I got that awesome looking Francavilla cover, and was stunned at how friggin’ cool the story was. I’m unfamiliar with the originals, but damn, in 1 issue, Liss did so much more with the character and giving us a STORY than I’ve seen from a lot of stuff lately.

Even though I should not like him for the Mystery Men/Bob Burden infringement thing…. :)

And also, thank you, Greg, because as I said elsewhere, this has been a crap week, but the one bright spot was thanks to you.

I found Paul Malmont’s Chinatown Death Cloud Peril (an advance copy, actually!) at a library book sale for a buck. Oh my my my, that was GREAT!!! Thank you so much for the recommendation, so much fun to read, to try to guess who “Otis” was, the interplay between Mr and Mrs Dent, how cool is Walter Gibson, and the cameo of Stan and Jack!!! Thank you!!!

Bruce Banner/Hulk was a core Avenger in the Marvel Adventures line.

I found Paul Malmont’s Chinatown Death Cloud Peril (an advance copy, actually!) at a library book sale for a buck. Oh my my my, that was GREAT!!!

The sequel is tremendous fun as well, and currently remaindered in hardcover from Amazon for pennies on the dollar.

Bruce Banner/Hulk was a core Avenger in the Marvel Adventures line.

So he was. I’d forgotten all about that. As awesome as the Marvel Adventures books are, and my students love them, they’re just a hair’s-breadth too juvenile for me most of the time. My ideal Avengers book is somewhere in between those and, say, The Ultimates. The movie hit that sweet spot in between the two exactly dead-on, which is why I adored it so. I have a really hard time coming up with actual Avengers comics stories that hit it as well… Ultron Unlimited is the one I keep coming back to…. maybe Under Siege, maybe Serpent Crown. And as far as the New Avengers are concerned, I think the only one that comes close is Secret Invasion.

You just made me realize another reason I liked The Avengers movie so much, Greg: it was the FIRST Avengers story I’ve liked in a long, long time. Since before Civil War I’d say. It’s not that they have been BAD, at least not as bad as DC’s comics have been since then, just not as good as they used to be. And I agree, they took the best ideas from the comics for the movie- which is exactly what a movie adaptation should do. Whedon did a great job, especially in giving every character, major or minor, his or her chance to shine. About the only thing I didn’t like was Coulson’s death, but even I have to admit it made sense for the story to work. And his death scene was great.

Now, the Elephant in the room is: What about the Justice League movie? DC/warner will want some of that billion dollar superteam movie pie, but they can’t seem to get their hero franchises off the ground except Batman’s. If you ask me, they should do it the other way around- start with a JL movie and then spinning off the characters. Ride The Avengers trails while they are hot.

Best of luck to you and the kids at the Con! :)

Hnh, most of the time if I’m picking up a Marvel book for K, it’s the Marvel Adventures ones. Those, at least, I only have to take a quick flip through to make sure it’s alright. Of course, she’s 10. We’ll have to check the library for some of these! I suspect a few might make it onto our shelves, too.

There’s a way to bring the Green Lama to the modern day, however, because the Lama’s origins are 100% tied to the mysteries of Tibet, I think you can’t go the route Sherlock or Dynamite’s the Spider has. I think Dynamite’s previous on the “modern day” Lama went too far from what made the original character work so well. I do have idea of what I’d want to do, but… I don’t want to spoil it just yet… wink wink

PS. For those interested in the Green Lama, there’s an event this Wednesday in NYC at the Rubin Museum: http://www.rmanyc.org/events/load/1776

Now, the Elephant in the room is: What about the Justice League movie? DC/Warner will want some of that billion dollar superteam movie pie, but they can’t seem to get their hero franchises off the ground except Batman’s.

Pfft. EVERYONE will want some of it. I think it’s safe to assume that as we speak, there are about a dozen superhero movies that suddenly found their options renewed and their rejected scripts dusted off. Oddly enough, I think it’s a Justice League movie that would have the hardest time getting done, because I’m pretty sure Christian Bale would be out and the Superman film isn’t released yet, so it’d be at least three years out.

The thing that Marvel did that was really, really smart, that no one seems to grasp, is to go into it with an actual plan and stuff already written. They created a string of movies starting with IRON MAN that the public thinks of as “the Marvel series.” AVENGERS was the sixth, not the first. DC hasn’t got any kind of plan like that so there’s nothing to build on. The DARK KNIGHT movies have nothing to do with GREEN LANTERN which has nothing to do with the upcoming MAN OF STEEL and so on.

There’s a way to bring the Green Lama to the modern day, however, because the Lama’s origins are 100% tied to the mysteries of Tibet, I think you can’t go the route Sherlock or Dynamite’s the Spider has.

If anyone can, you can, Adam. But I kind of like him doing what you have him doing (fighting Nazi sorcerers) myself.

I’ve been loving Dynamite’s pulp revivals quite a bit myself, although I confess I have yet to check out The Lone Ranger. The Spider is one I’m pretty unfamiliar with; for whatever reason, reprints of his adventures have eluded me over the years. I did happen across that exact edition of Master of the Night Demons a couple of weeks ago at a local Book Rack, though. Haven’t gotten around to reading it yet.

Greg, if I get to take the Lama into the modern day, it won’t be for a long time to come (I’ve got a lot for him to do in the 30s/40s just yet!)

Have you been watching “Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes” on Disney XD (or Netflix Watch Instantly)? I think it’s absolutely brilliant. Both the tone and the story are the perfect melding of the Ultimate line, the Adventures line, the movies, and the original comics, taking the best elements of each and blending them into an epic and emotionally rich PG-rated story. The second season is unspooling now and I’m on the edge of my seat.

I would go so far as to say that showrunner Christopher Yost should get a big chunk of the credit for the success of the Avengers movie. He was the one who cracked the nut, and then Joss followed his lead, not just in the relationship of the Hulk to the Avengers, but in many other areas.

I have been very leery of this new Spider book. As I’ve went on record to my friends, I love the Moonstone stuff and had a negative knee jerk reaction to both the costume design and the preview in the back of The Shadow #2. Thanks to your review, Greg, I will definitely give it a try. And kudos to turning your student on to Page’s fun prose.
Drunken Fist, the main current source for new reprints of The Spider is Girasol Collectables. Although, there are also a lot of good legal Spider PDFs for download at The Vintage Library (which is full of other pulpy goodness as well!).

I think one of the secrets to getting the Hulk right in the Avengers movie is that he works far better as part of an ensemble than as the lead… or maybe that’s just my take on a character I’ve never been that into.

The Spider stuff looks really cool, might need to check out the trades.

I’ve been wanting to check out some Spider books based on what you’ve said about them in previous articles. Amazon didn’t have any available for the Kindle,, and I hadn’t seen any at my usual book store. Luckily, at some point within the last few weeks, dozens of them have been released for the Kindle, all at a $2.99 price tag. I’m sure I could probably get them cheaper if I found them at a used book store, but this is a good way to get a few to try out.

Have you been watching “Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes” on Disney XD (or Netflix Watch Instantly)? I think it’s absolutely brilliant. Both the tone and the story are the perfect melding of the Ultimate line, the Adventures line, the movies, and the original comics, taking the best elements of each and blending them into an epic and emotionally rich PG-rated story.

We own the first season. Everything Matt says is true.

I’ll be vague to avoid spoiling it for you poor saps who haven’t seen the movie yet, but Banner’s line to Cap right before his final transformation, right before the big fight, may be my favorite line in the movie.

spoiler alert… maybe

Hulk’s current comic status quo is that the Hulk is in charge and Banner is the monster trying to get out.

nice colum have to say loving what dynamite is doing with the spider giving him a new updated twist but keeping all that made him work . as for the avengers film. one good thing that has come out of it is the hulk has some new popularity after two earlier attempts. as for a jl movie no doubt warners is getting pressure to try and do their own avengers. problem is they proably will find a way to do it wrong mostly because of their thing about not having superman and batman ever team up in live action .

Travis Pelkie

May 27, 2012 at 2:50 am

Also on the Spider — I haven’t read any of the original pulp stuff, but Liss’s story definitely made me feel that he was updating the original — that all the stuff he was showing us was the new version of the old, so it’s nice to see that that is the actual case.

Here’s a question as to the Shadow — in the Ennis book, it seems that the Shadow is a bit more supernatural than the pulps. Am I just unfamiliar with how supernatural the Shadow was, or is Ennis amping that part up (or suggesting it’s more supernatural, anyway)?

I like the first 2 issues of the Shadow, but I don’t love them like the first issue of the Spider. It seemed like Ennis relied a bit too much on people just knowing about the Shadow and didn’t take the time to introduce us to Cranston and Lane et al.

Whereas the Spider laid out all the players, their relationships, and set up the intriguing mystery. It just worked a whole lot better for me. I think sometimes some comics writers forget that sometimes you HAVE to have some exposition.

Travis Pelkie

May 27, 2012 at 3:12 am

Oh, and with that Bionic Man cover, are you aware of how the Venture Brothers have utilized that episode? And on that topic, what are your thoughts on the way certain shows like VB, or Harvey Birdman, or shows like that take elements of pop culture, particularly stuff aimed at kids, and give it an “adult” spin?

And I had seen the Malmont sequel in the library, but didn’t want to devour all his stuff at once. I saw a Liss book too, and it appeared to be a historical romance type thing, iirc. Strange that he does pulp so well (or is that strange?)

Oh, and with that Bionic Man cover, are you aware of how the Venture Brothers have utilized that episode? And on that topic, what are your thoughts on the way certain shows like VB, or Harvey Birdman, or shows like that take elements of pop culture, particularly stuff aimed at kids, and give it an “adult” spin?

I’d heard about the Venture brothers and it struck me as being more or less the same joke that people have been doing about Gilligan and the Skipper for decades. I think it’s funny a couple of times and then it gets old. I can watch Harvey Birdman now and then and it makes me laugh but a steady diet of that sort of thing would probably irritate me. It’s nothing to do with ‘aimed at kids’ so much as it is an awareness that snarking off about something is so EASY. I could do this column in about an hour every week if I built it around jeering at stupid stuff Marvel and DC are doing. (And it’d get thousands more hits, too, probably.)

Here’s a question as to the Shadow — in the Ennis book, it seems that the Shadow is a bit more supernatural than the pulps. Am I just unfamiliar with how supernatural the Shadow was, or is Ennis amping that part up (or suggesting it’s more supernatural, anyway)?

It depends on WHICH Shadow you’re doing. There is no one version, any more than there’s one Batman. In the pulps he was just good at everything and used a lot of gimmicks and magic tricks, along with hypnosis– Walter Gibson was an accomplished stage magician, and he ghosted books for guys like Blackstone and so on. A lot of that went into his Shadow stories. On radio, the Shadow had powers– mostly, he could turn invisible, but he was also sort of telepathic, and he never bothered with the hat and cape because when he was the Shadow he was invisible. The comics, starting with O’Neil and Kaluta back in the 1970s, have usually amalgamated the two. Then there’s the Alec Baldwin movie which amalgamated the two but in a different way…

Offhand it looks like they’re doing the Garth Ennis version of the amalgamated O’Neil version, where the Shadow has a team of agents and a hat and cloak and two .45s, but also Margo Lane and the power to cloud men’s minds with hypnosis. But in the real-history milieu of The Shadow Strikes! by Gerard Jones and Ed Barreto, and with more cursing. How’s that?

Whereas the Spider laid out all the players, their relationships, and set up the intriguing mystery. It just worked a whole lot better for me. I think sometimes some comics writers forget that sometimes you HAVE to have some exposition.

If you don’t have it in your FIRST ISSUE, you’re doing it wrong. This was a big part of what put me off I, VAMPIRE and some of the other ‘New 52′ books that should have been right up my alley.

Travis Pelkie

May 27, 2012 at 7:05 pm

” It’s nothing to do with ‘aimed at kids’ so much as it is an awareness that snarking off about something is so EASY.”

That is true. It’s certainly not the best joke on Venture Bros by a long shot, but it’s a slightly amusing bit. Fortunately there’s so much other good stuff on that show that an easy, cliche joke like that doesn’t annoy too badly. VB is really good at laying out a world with all those tropes of adventure cartoons and comics, and actually packing them with emotional impact as well.

Hm, thinking about it, they probably do use a lot of those cliche jokes, but I think they’re really really done well, so I tend to forgive them more.

I figured that the Shadow wasn’t quite one version, I suppose, and was interested more in which version was being done here. In addition to the clouding men’s minds, though, it seems like the Shadow can talk to the dead/resurrect the dead in the Ennis version. Unless there’s more to it we haven’t seen yet (that is, whatever he’s doing looks supernatural but isn’t).

That Spider series looks & sounds great!

I also agree that the Avengers movie captures the essence of the comics without necessarily following particular Avengers story. My son loves the Avengers cartoon and we found a comic spinning-off from the series in the library which was great. I have to say, I would have preferred to see

SPOILER ALERT

Kang instead of Thanos

END SPOILER ALERT

at the end of the movie.

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