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CSBG Archive

50 Greatest Spider-Man Stories: #25-21

In honor of the fiftieth anniversary of Spider-Man, we’re doing four straight months of polls having to do with Spider-Man, culminating with the release of the Amazing Spider-Man film in July. We’ve done Spider-Man covers, Spider-Man characters, Spider-Man creators and now, finally, Spider-Man stories!

You all voted, now here are the results of what you chose as the 50 Greatest Spider-Man Stories! We continue with #25-21. Click here for a master list of all the stories revealed so far!

Enjoy!

25. “Confessions,” Ultimate Spider-Man #13

In this delightful issue by writer Brian Michael Bendis and artists Mark Bagley and Art Thibert, Peter Parker reveals his secret identity to his best friend, Mary Jane Watson….

It is a great payoff for the first year’s worth of stories in Ultimate Spider-Man, as the entire issue is a dialogue between the two friends (and soon to be more than just friends). Aunt May’s role in the issue as the mother worried about two teens alone in a room together “studying” is really well handled by Bendis.

24. “Maximum Carnage,” Spider-Man Unlimited #1-2, Web of Spider-Man #101-103, Amazing Spider-Man #378-380, Spider-Man #35-37 and Spectacular Spider-Man #201-203

On the one hand, this was “just” a massive action-driven epic based on the straightforward concept of the evil Carnage forming a sort of Masters of Evil to terrorize New York, forcing Spider-Man to put together his own motley crew of New York-based heroes (the Avengers and the Fantastic Four were both busy), including his old enemy, Venom.

However, I like to look at it instead as a meditation on the role of “grim and gritty” in the early 1990s comic books, especially in Part 9 (by J.M. DeMatteis) where he examines Spider-Man’s ultimate willingness to let Firestar kill Carnage to end the whole “war.” However…there has to be a line between Spider-Man and Venom, right? Right?

The ending of that story is a real favorite of mine. DeMatteis returns to a character he notably wrote earlier in his career and it is just quite moving. To see such a moment in a massive FOURTEEN-PART crossover is quite remarkable, I think.

23. “The Second Hobgoblin Saga,” Amazing Spider-Man #249-251 (partially), 259-261, 275-277, 279

Tom DeFalco took over Amazing in the middle of the end of the First Hobgoblin Saga by Roger Stern, but soon DeFalco put his own spin on the mysterious Hobgoblin (along with penciler Ron Frenz and inker Joe Rubinstein). One of the ways he did so was by inventing his OWN new mysterious villain, The Rose, and played him off of the Hobgoblin while also setting up a confrontation between the two (which eventually took place in Gang War after DeFalco was off of the book).

Also, a key factor in DeFalco’s take on the Hobgoblin was making a clean separation from the Osborn mythos. DeFalco did that in a three-part arc from #259-261 where the Hobgoblin kidnaps Harry Osborn’s wife, Liz as well as Mary Jane Watson to force Harry to give him more access to Norman Osborn’s secrets.

Spider-Man eventually tracks him down and beats him to a pulp, but Hobgoblin takes advantage of Spidey’s heroism…

Ultimately, the journal Hobgoblin fought so hard for turned out to be useless. He had no more information from Osborn to go on – he had to become his own man. This was evident in his return in #275-277, as the Hobgoblin trained to become better capable of fighting Spider-Man after Spidey beat him so badly in #261.

This arc also brought Flash Thompson into the Hobgoblin fracas, as Flash became everyone’s number one guess as the secret identity of the Hogboblin. Before DeFalco left, he also began to play ANOTHER mysterious super-villain, the Jack O’Lantern off of Hobgoblin. It was a wonderful juggling act by DeFalco that we sadly never saw him finish.

22. “Power and Responsibility,” Ultimate Spider-Man #1-7

One of the best aspects of the re-imagining of Spider-Man by Brian Michael Bendis, Mark Bagley and Art Thibert (based on ideas from Bill Jemas) was that by spreading the origin of Spider-Man out over a number of issues, Bendis could really develop Uncle Ben so that by the time that Uncle Ben dies, his death really reverberates…

Remember, Ditko and Lee did not even get a chance to have Uncle Ben actually SAY the “Great Power” line! Bagley’s re-designs of the characters were great. Very fresh. An auspicious beginning to one of the greatest Spider-Man runs of all-time (a run that is still going strong…well…with a different Spider-Man, but still!).

21. “Venom,” Amazing Spider-Man #299-300

In Venom, writer David Michelinie and artist Todd McFarlane were able to introduce one of the strongest additions to the Spider-Man Rogues Gallery in quite some time. Twenty-plus years later, Venom has continued to hold a major place in the Spider-Man mythos, only now as a hero.

The establishment of Eddie Brock, disgraced journalist (from the classic Death of Jean DeWolff storyline) as being merged with the alien symbiote, with both of them hungering for vengeance on Spider-Man? That is a great hook. And McFarlane’s visuals for Venom were spectacular. Heck, just look at the introduction…

You knew things were never going to be the same again when you saw THAT cliffhanger!

47 Comments

I expected Venom to be on here as well as Power & Responsibility. Confessions wouldn’t make my top 50 and most likely neither would DeFalco’s Hobgoblin saga (although I do like DeFalco’s run and think it’s criminally underrated because he had such big shoes to fill. which also happened to him on Thor). I can only assume Maximum Carnage is on here due to nostalgia from those who started reading Spider-Man in the 90s, because it is a truly awful “storyline.” I hope that doesn’t mean we’ll see the Clone Saga too.

Bendis has had his moments, and Ult. #13 was one of them. It wasn’t Peter-telling-Aunt-May good, but it was good.

I never read the end of Maximum Carnage. Did it redeem itself somehow?

@Robert

Considering the cult following Ben Reilly enjoys on the internets, it’s definitely a possibility.

I can only assume Maximum Carnage is on here due to nostalgia from those who started reading Spider-Man in the 90s, because it is a truly awful “storyline.”

My sentiments exactly. To me, Maximum Carnage is bloated, pointless and unreadable.

I know I should not take such a list very seriously….but….MAXIMUM CARNAGE?:)
C’mon.

John Klein III

June 27, 2012 at 7:22 am

I’ve been kicking myself for not entering my list and Maximum Carnage would have been my number one, just love everything about it. Just happy to see it made the list!

On a more positive note, I love Ron Frenz’s art you are featuring here for the The Second Hobgoblin Saga. Is that from ASM #261? Great stuff.

I’ve been kicking myself for not entering my list and Maximum Carnage would have been my number one, just love everything about it. Just happy to see it made the list!

I’m not picking on you John Klein III, but when you say you love everything about Maximum Carnage, I wonder what you mean by that?

Do you love the artwork? I mean, I can see that. I dig Mark Bagley and Sal Buscema. To me, Tom Lyle and Alex Saviuk are just fine.

The characters? Venom and Carnage are bad ass characters from certain points of view. (I think Carnage is a little two one-note to be interesting, personally). Shriek, Doppelganger, Demogoblin and Carrion II are all a little weak, though, which is why I suspect you don’t see them used much any more.

The battles? I admit, they were pretty epic in scope, lots of characters blasting, slicing and punching each other.

(I’m honestly trying to see the positives here)

I don’t hate maximum carnage. it’s a big silly fun story but it isn’t one of the 25 best spider man stories. that’s insane.

Y don´t like “Maximum Carnage” and I think “Kraven’s last hunt” is overrated. However, a good Spidey collection is not complete without any of these, so I have a copy of both and certainly I can see why it was included here. That doesn’t mean “Maximum Carnage” doesn´t represent the worst of the 90’s.

Wow, that Venom splash was early McFarlane? I guess everyone has to start somewhere, but it looks like fan art to me.

Ed (A Different One)

June 27, 2012 at 8:47 am

You know, that first DeFalco run on ASM with Frenz really was pretty good. I tend to underrate it because they’re the ones who replaced Stern/JRjr on the title and, well, dammit, I wanted more Stern/JRjr!!! But I can definitely put DeFalco/Frenz on the 2nd tier of all time great ASM runs in my own personal rating system (boy, won’t they be flattered!). The first tier is reserved for Lee/Ditko and the aforementioned Stern/JRjr.

I did enjoy the Confessions storyline in USM and I think Bendis/Bagley hit all the right notes with it. I’m just not a USM guy at heart so it didn’t make my list.

Maximum Carnage . ? . ? . ? Sheesh. That storyline was the main reason I got out of comics the 2nd time around. But, hey, if you like it you like it. My own personal list of favorites probably has a few questionable items as well . . . .

@Ian Miller – Exactly! Even though I wasn’t a big fan of even his later, more polished work, McFarlane’s early issues of ASM just looked rushed, sloppy and unprofessional to me. I mean his later art, even though it wasn’t my cup of tea, I had to admit was well drawn for what it was. But those early issues looked like something a high school art student could have easily come up with.

Man, I’ve been overwhelmingly negative so far. None of my stories have come up yet, so hopefully I’ll have a reason to “gush” here in the next couple of posts . . .

The establishment of Eddie Brock, disgraced journalist (from the classic Death of Jean DeWolff storyline) as being merged with the alien symbiote, with both of them hungering for vengeance on Spider-Man? That is a great hook.

Really? Even among people who think Venom is cool, most agree that his motivation and original premise are incredibly lame. It’s a major reason why no one uses his original motivation in any adaptation and tries to find a better one. Or why there have been so many stories trying to find him a new, better motivation for hating Spidey, turn him into a hero, or give the identity to someone else altogether. The “hook” is by far the worst most inane aspect of Venom. What was Spider-Man supposed to do, let Sin-Eater keep killing so that Brock could keep his job?

Much prefer the earlier McFarlane on Hulk & ASM to what he became.

John Klein III

June 27, 2012 at 9:20 am

JoeMac,

I have to say that my first comic book ever was Amazing 371 (which is an odd one to jump in on) and then I was just hooked. Maximum Carnage holds a special place in my heart as it was my first “mega” event and it had so many characters and it felt like a huge pay off to what came before. The art is awesome with still my two favorite Spider-Artists (Sal Buscema & Mark Bagley – JRJR being my third). I liked how the heroes had to fight for the wins, nothing came easy for them.

It was so epic and I still look back at it fondly. I know some people say it made Spider-Man darker than before but I think J.M. DeMatteis (who is by far my favorite Spider-Writer of all time) plays with that at his best. I like how many characters are used and how they are used and it was a nice introduction to a few odd ones as well. I like how and when Captain America shows up. I hadn’t branched out of Spider-Man yet at that point so seeing Cap through Spider-Man’s eyes gave me an interesting prespective on Cap.

I was die hard Spider-Man fan until the whole One More Day nonsense, haven’t read him sense except for Ultimate Spider-Man and in Avengers but pretty much these days I’m just reading X-Titles. Though he shows up from time to time in AvX and that’s been good enough.

@T.

“It’s a major reason why no one uses his original motivation in any adaptation and tries to find a better one”

Really? I guess a fake photograph in “Spider-Man 3”, Eddie being fired in the 90’s cartoon or Eddie being angry at Peter in Spectacular Spider-Man cartoon is better than a fake lead on the Sin-Eater. Other than USM, most of Venom origins have a similar cause.

@T.

I recommed you–and everyone else–pick up a copy of Zeb Wells’ Venom Dark Origin.

He does say he’s including Maximum Carnage on the basis of its value as a historical text more than on its actual mertis.

@Dennis.

Dark Origin has some continuity problems. that said, it is a good story.

MAXIMUM CARNAGE?!?! Argh.

I did vote for Amazing #300, so I’m glad to see that’s on here.

@Ed: I also really like the Defalco/Frenz run. The only downside is they left before their storylines were finished and Jim Owsley finished up them up in ways that didn’t make sense. So you get lots of great buildup but the payoff is kind of crap.

The “hook” is by far the worst most inane aspect of Venom. What was Spider-Man supposed to do, let Sin-Eater keep killing so that Brock could keep his job?

I always read it as the sort of thing that was supposed to be ridiculous. You’re supposed to read Brock as a petty, miserable man with a persecution complex. He hates himself and blames everyone else. Then the symbiote, which already had this spurned-lover sort of thing going on, comes along and directs all his spite at Peter. Reading it that way, I find it’s a pretty compelling origin.

Maximum Carnage was an awesome something; unfortunately that “something” is a game, not a comic. I read somewhere (probably Life of Reilly) that the crossover had earned the name “Maximum Garbage” around the Spider offices. Better still was the subsequent “clonage” event, which was dubbed “Maximum Bonage” in memos.

Really? I guess a fake photograph in “Spider-Man 3”, Eddie being fired in the 90’s cartoon or Eddie being angry at Peter in Spectacular Spider-Man cartoon is better than a fake lead on the Sin-Eater. Other than USM, most of Venom origins have a similar cause.

In all of those cases, Brock had a preexisting problematic relationship and rivalry with Peter. In Spider-Man 3 and the 90s cartoon he was a demonstrated scumbag with character issues before becoming Venom to boot. And in two of the versions, Peter actually did something directly and specifically to Brock to cause him to lose his job. And in SPectacular Spider-Man we saw a series of misunderstandings, misinterpretations, and mishaps to give Brock a laundry list of reasons to hate Peter.

In Michelinie’s version he didn’t know Peter Parker at all, in any capacity. And neither Peter nor Spider-Man did anything directly to him, it was all incredibly indirect. And it was implied that Brock was a normal, regular guy who was not trying to pull a fast one or fake a story at all, yet still blamed Spider-Man for busting the Sin-Eater.

RE: Venom’s origin,

T is absolutely right. Every adaptation of the Eddie Brock storyline has attempted to tweak Brock’s motives, to grant him some kind of comprehensible motive for his actions.

In ASM 300 it is clearly established that Brock is a nutjob. You don’t need to give him a comprenhesive motive, you don’t need to pre-establish friendship or rivaldry between them. In Spider-Man 3, Raimi also established that Brock is nuts: he thinks he has a relationship with Gwen, when they only shared coffee.

I’m with T, in that Venom’s oriignal origin is stupid as hell. It was one of the big reasons why I never got the big deal about the guy back when I was a kid reading it, outside his cool visual. Dude was granted Spidey Supervillian of the 90s despite not doing anything to earn it.

In ASM 300 it is clearly established that Brock is a nutjob. You don’t need to give him a comprenhesive motive, you don’t need to pre-establish friendship or rivaldry between them.

Yes, he’s nuts, but that shouldn’t operate as a total pass for a nonsensical origin. I’m not saying every villain needs a comprehensive motive or a pre-established relationship, but if it’s going to be someone you’re building up to be an archenemy, and you are teasing this guy’s existence for years, like Michelinie was doing for Venom since his Web of Spider-Man days, and you are claiming this guy has an all-consuming hatred of Spider-Man, it makes for a pretty lame payoff for him to have such a nonexistent relationship with Peter.

In Spider-Man 3, Raimi also established that Brock is nuts: he thinks he has a relationship with Gwen, when they only shared coffee.

It’s not the nuts part I have a problem with. Green Goblin was nuts. The Joker is nuts. Lots of great villains are nuts. It’s the “stupid, noncompelling, and random as hell” part I have a problem with, not the “nuts” part.

My point is that if you see Brock motivations as a problem, the same are no better in the other adaptations: “Peter is better than I and knows Gwen, let’s kill him”, “Peter a coward, lets kill him!”, “It’s Peters fault they fired me, lets kill him!”. Bendis establishes that Brock is essentially a bad person that craves power. He gets his chance with the suit. That explanation to me is essentially the same as the others: Brock is nuts. That should be enough.

John Klein III,

When you explain it like that, I can see your POV. Thank you for sharing a well thought out reason for liking Maximum Carnage. I appreciate that it hooked you into becoming a long time Spidey fan.

Wow, that Venom splash was early McFarlane? I guess everyone has to start somewhere, but it looks like fan art to me.

I wonder some times if that is exactly why McFarlane, Larson, Liefield, et al, became so popular. “Hey, look at this kewl new artist. I can draw just like that! Isn’t that $h!t extreme?!”

My point is that if you see Brock motivations as a problem, the same are no better in the other adaptations:

I DO see your points. I’m just disagreeing with them. I don’t think the other ones are just as bad, for the reasons I said. We’ll just have to agree to disagree it seems.

That explanation to me is essentially the same as the others: Brock is nuts. That should be enough.

Again, the nuts part isn’t the problem to me. It’s the utterly stupid and nonsensical part that’s the problem. Every incarnation has him as nuts. But the moronic aspects are unique to Michelinie’s version.

I have a personal list of the ten worst Spider-Man stories ever. It’s interesting to know it overlaps in at least two places with the 25 best Spider-Man stories ever.

I’m sure there’s some philosophical conclusion to draw, either about myself, or others, or merely the nature of truth.

sandwich eater

June 27, 2012 at 5:31 pm

I love Maximum Carnage because as a kid I rented the Maximum Carnage video game for Super Nintendo over and over. It was one of my favorites. That game was awesome since you could play as Spider-Man or Venom, and you could call upon various Marvel characters for assistance. That game along with the cartoons of that era were my introduction to the Marvel Universe. I didn’t actually get around to reading Maximum Carnage until a few years ago. I really wish Marvel would commission an HD remake of the Maximum Carnage game.

The Maximum Carnage video game was pretty fun and the Green Jelly “Carnage Rules” song is stuck in my head now just thinking about it. But the storyline itself was pretty much a mess. However I do understand some voting for it out of nostalgia or whatever because they got into comics around that time. I’m from the Secret Wars generation and, while I recognize its flaws as an adult, I still love it to death. So yeah I get the nostalgia factor influenced some to vote for it.

Maximum Carnage. Seriously. At this point, absolutely nothing that shows up can surprise me.

I don’t want this to sound like I dislike Power & Responsibility, because I really do think it’s well done. But, assuming this is the highest placing we’ll be seeing for an Ultimate story, I’m disappointed that this is the highest ranked one. Power & Responsibility is, for all of its many virtues, really just a 7-issue retelling of Amazing Fantasy #15, and it represents the only story in the Ultimate canon where Bendis didn’t really get to create new interpretations of things (besides the new Goblin). And again, I’m not saying this makes it bad or anything, but it’s definitely the least original of all the ultimate stuff. Compared to things like Learning Curve, Confessions, Warriors, Ultimate Knights, Ultimate Clone Saga, the first annual (with Kitty), and The World According to Peter Parker (my #1), it just doesn’t hold up.

And it makes me wonder if a lot of people simply wanted one Ultimate story in their top ten, didn’t know which one to pick, and eventually just went with the first one. It’s the same voting trap we see when people are asked to name their favorite Starman story, Y: The Last Man story, and many other classic runs–when no particular story stands out as being obviously the best, people just pick the first one.

And while I like Power & Responsibility, I just think it’s unfortunate that people who haven’t read any Ultimate Spidey will see this list and assume it’s the run’s high-point, when (IMHO) that couldn’t be further form the truth. The 160-issue whole is one of my 8-10 favorite runs ever, and I think it’s one of the rare runs that legitimately kept getting better almost the whole time (even though Learning Curve is still a high point and the Death storyline wasn’t the best ending).

Oh well, that’s my rant.

Tood McFarlane’s art was so much like fanboy submissions I can’t imagine how he ever ended up on ASM or ever became a fan favorite. What is the appeal there? Can anyone tell me?

Remember Todd did not ink his ASM work until 300, so that pic was inked by someone else dont remember the inker.

The appeal for me of McFarlane’s art was that it was awesome. Sorry that’s not more helpful, but it was just so cool and so different and so energetic. I was 11 and I didn’t think i could do that. But i did think ever prior spider-man artist (which i had been exposed to through Marvel Tales, Marvel Masterworks, and reading the books for 2 yrs) instantly looked dated.

it was like the Wizard of Oz when the world turns color.

Ed (A Different One)

June 29, 2012 at 6:48 am

The reason I didn’t go for Todd’s art (or that of his collegues) was that they transformed
Spidey from a somewhat realistic looking human figure into something that looked like a very cartoony creature. One of Spidey’s biggest appeals to me growing up was just how amazing it was for a human to perform the incredible feats he was portrayed as doing in the comics. When the “figure” looked realistically human, that just highlighted to me how amazing he was. When the “figure” looked like some cartoony Spidery creature, it lost the “amazing” element. Everyone expects a cartoony Spidery creature to leap and bend and flip and swing from webs, but to see something that actually looks human do it was far more amazing to me.

But that’s why they have menus in restaurants. Not everyone likes the same thing . . . .

I was there, as a 12 year old, amazed at McFarlane’s artwork. I’d just learned about him on Hulk. But looking back, it is pretty cruddy looking. I think he had some good dynamics, like the freaky poses he had Spider-man do, but the actual technique is quite bad. The artists before had a lot better fundamentals, and the ones after had better technique. For whatever reason, his art just screams “suck” at me now.

In comparison, Art Adams was another favorite of mine at that time, and his art holds up quite well, really really solid.

So that shot of Venom, rather than a game changing iconic image, strikes me as XXXTREME!!!! It makes sense that the symbiote dislocated Brocks jaw and grew him teeth, right?

I was just saying to my wife (on the eve of the new Spider-man flick) how I still can follow most Marvel comics and enjoy them, but I lost all passion for Spider-man as a comic such a long time ago. Issue three of the McFarlane Spider-Man series was the last regular issue I ever bought…. That DOOM DOOM DOOM thing was so bad, it woke my adolescent self up and made me feel regret for having bought so much.

Three cheers for the DeMattias/ Sal Buscema Sensationals at the same time that hold up so well today and don’t make me feel ashamed!

surprised to find maxium carnage on thls list for not only was it too long but focused on one of the nastiest rip off spider man bad guys carnage. plus the second hobgoblin saga started marvel winding up screwing up a really interesting characters i.d by making it still confusing of who hobby is really suppose to be in the end.

Maximum Carnage was a great game. Makes me wish I still had my Super NES.

Wow, I’m surprise it’s this high where things really seem to be coming off the rails. No matter what you think of Maximum Carnage, the idea that it would make any “best” Spider-man list is just…wow.

I like The Hobgoblin stories then….(though I’m not sure we didn’t all see Flash as a red herring…the catch was that he was revealed to be the Hobgoblin!…and it was a double fake. People were made they promised the reveal, and it was a trick). But it’ll always be scarred by how the character was ruined right after that. And really tying up the Green Goblin tie in….was that beating before or after he got the Goblin formula and became super strong? Because he did eventually get that I thought.

And then the Ultimate Spider-man start….to me it was everything that was wrong with comic books at the time. You take a story told in not even a full comic issue, and drag it out to 7 issues. Not so you could “flesh out characters” but so you could put it together as a trade paperback. And Lee did it more effectively in like 1/10 the pages. That comic run may be the best work Bendis has done…but it was unnecessarily lengthened.

About Venom’s origins, I have to say I mostly prefer the Ultimate and Spectacular versions. Although I did like Dark Origin, we all know none of it had been thought at the time Spider-Man #300 rolled in. The original motivation was kinda dumb, and we’ve seen several attempts at making it more interesting in the comics all over the years (such as Dark Origin).

The Ultimate version takes the time to establish Brock as an asshole and basically asks the question “What if someone less caring about responsibility got Spider-Man’s powers?”. The reasons for him not liking Peter/Spidey were not important, but all the backstory and the fact that they used to be friends were. It also gave us a kickass Playstation 2 game.

The Spectacular version, though, was very interesting. While Brock hated Parker instead of Spider-Man and started hating him for reasons due to misunderstandings and lack of information, the reason he kept at it after learning the truth instead of going “Wait a minute, if Peter is Spidey, that’d explain away all the reasons I hate him” was that the symbiote worked like a drug, and hate was the thing that kept them bonded. Brock only kept on hating Peter because he didn’t want to lose the symbiote, not because he still felt the same way.

Although you have to admit that several of Spidey’s problems in the original comics have been his indirect fault for not considering a few small problems worthy of attention. He left a burglar pass him by and he ended up killing his uncle. He left another thug go and he became the Hobgoblin. He didn’t give a second thought at what might happen to Brock’s career once he revealed the truth about Sin-Eater and (more alarmingly) he didn’t make sure the symbiote was destroyed or contained after getting rid of him and they both combined to form Venom.

In other topic, I also hate Maximum Carnage. Not only Carnage is a stupid one-note villain, but the story drags for too long. It did gave us a kickass SNES game, though. Ah, the memories…

I recently read the Max Carnage stuff…I think that, as mentioned, for 90’s fans who started into Spidey, it holds as a solid memory. Visually, the stories look great but I think that it could have just focused on Carnage, Venom and Spidey and the fact that Spidey had to team up with one of his most hated foes to stop an even more ruthless one. All the supporting cast of villains (and heroes) was unnecessary and it could have easily been packed into 4-6 issues tops had they worked harder on the storyline. I dont think I would put it this high on the list but again, that is just one fan’s opinion.

@Eric:

That story actually exists; it’s the first appearance of Carnage. Spidey ends teaming-up with Venom, who believed that he had died in a deserted island. So Maximum carnage is not only crowded. It’s also redundant.

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