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CSBG Archive

I Love Ya But You’re Strange – A Bunch of Vehicles Talk Smack About Wonder Woman’s Robot Plane

Every week, I will spotlight strange but ultimately endearing comic stories (basically, we’re talking lots and lots of Silver Age comic books). Here is the archive of all the installments of this feature. Feel free to e-mail me at bcronin@comicbookresources.com if you have a suggestion for a future installment!

Today we look at a delightfully bizarre tale of Wonder Woman’s robot plane getting mocked by other historic vehicles during a time it was on loan to a museum.

The second story in Wonder Woman #86 was written by Robert Kanigher and drawn by H.G. Peter. This 1956 tale was soon before Ross Andru and Mike Esposito took over the book and re-designed the robot plane.

So anyhow, the plane is on loan to the local museum for an exhibit about famous vehicles…

Sp the other vehicles proceed to talk shit about the robot plane…

This does not impress the other vehicles…

So the plane tells another one.

They’re STILL not impressed…

I love how dickish the other vehicles are about the plane getting stolen. “Oh well, who cares?”

Then, of course, the plane proves itself…

Some fair weather friends you got there, robot plane!

I now want to see a future Justice League story where the Batmobile insults the robot plane. Don’t let me down, Geoff Johns!

20 Comments

Yes, someone let Geoff Johns and Grant Morrison know that it’s canon that there’s a sentient surly conestoga wagon out there.

Good God, someone hide this from Grant Morrison.

Has CSBG! covered The Fighting Guns of Easy (Our Army At War #146)? That one has Kanigher anthropomorphizing machine guns. God bless that man.

Every time I hear her aircraft described as a “Robot Plane” I can’t help but think of Robotech or the like, and imagine Wonder Woman flying around in a giant invisible transforming plane. Think of the battles with Giganta! Or the cyclopes! Or any other mythological monsters!

Even for Kanigher’s Wonder Woman, that was seriously nutty.
Of course, he later did a story where Flash imagines his costume talking to him, so …

Oh man this ranks right up there with Streaky the Wonder Cat! Agreed though, hid this from Grant Morrison!

So if her plane was on display in a museum, is it safe to say it wasn’t supposed to be invisible back then, just clear?

That story is from 1956? I would’ve never guessed. Peter’s art style was kind of anachronistic.

interesting knew wonder womans plane was taken away think after crisis but did not know as far back as the fifties it got in a museme and is a robot too. plus the other vehicles seem to be jelous because they are talking smack about it. wonder how long before grant finds this story and uses it

Wow, look at those cool colors on the iceberg! And I love that mechanical lettering.

Best part is that the other vehicles stop talking smack about the plane because they think it handled the thieves by itself, but it was actually WW’s commands to it that made it happen. I wonder if that’s what the “One Day…” at the end is for — the plane wants to, one day, take out some bad guys solo.

I don’t know why the rest of you guys want this hidden from Morrison (hide it from Johns and co!), but I totally want to read about the Legion of Historical Sentient Vehicles. The wagon, Viking ship, Batmobile, WW’s plane, submarine, a space shuttle, and some vehicle from the future that comes back to bring them together. Hells yeah!

Is it just me or does the outside of the museum not appear big enough to house all of those exhibits?

“That story is from 1956? I would’ve never guessed. Peter’s art style was kind of anachronistic.”

Cool Arrow, I’ve always been fascinated by H G Peter’s run on Wonder Woman. His style was anachronistic when the character 1st launched in 1941. Peter was born in 1880 and his style remained as a “turn of the century newspaper cartoonist” with little evolution through out his career. As I understand (& I’m sure Brian will correct me if I’m wrong), William Moulton Marston selected H G Peter as WW’s artist. It was an odd choice but Marston got away with a lot of the bondage elements of his WW stories due to Peter’s outdated and cartoonish style. Whether that was by Marston’s (or the editor’s) design, I don’t know. Interesting that Peter continued to draw Wonder Woman for 11 years after Marston’s death and until his own death in 1958. Wonder why DC didn’t make a chance to a more modern style of art before Peter died?

“… but I totally want to read about the Legion of Historical Sentient Vehicles. The wagon, Viking ship, Batmobile, WW’s plane, submarine, a space shuttle, and some vehicle from the future that comes back to bring them together. Hells yeah!”

Got to include the Supermobile in there too: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supermobile

I find the aerodynamics and design of Wonder Woman’s plane (as well as the “first plane”) to be dubious.

ZZZ, I was thinking the same thing. “And here we have on display, Wonder Woman’s invisible plane” “Where?”
Of course then Every museum could actually claim that they have her invisible plane on display.

Those other vehicles are full of themselves… “What did you ever do alone?” What did any of them do on their own? Stupid viking ship was never on the verge of falling off the world and it was the vikings that steered it. Jerks.

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I love the old Wonder Woman stories. I prefer them way more than the misandrist, violent nonsense going on in the current Wonder Woman book.

@Matty Macomber: Yeah! And the prairie schooner not only needed human assistance, but also horses!

I was really getting pissed off at the vehicles for being such snobs but then I realized “oh yeah, they’re just cars and shit.” I don’t know why I was expecting them to be particularly virtuous. Even most of the humans in comics back then were complete assholes.

I like the ambiguity of the last panel. Either R.P. is starting off another anecdote or he’s wistfully contemplating his revenge upon the dickmobiles. I think I prefer the latter interpretation.

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