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Comic Book Six Degrees: Timber Wolf to Street Wolf

I name two comic book characters. You then have to connect the two using only shared appearances in comic books (official appearances in comics only – no cameos like Terry Austin sneaking Popeye into the background of a panel and no outside comic book appearances, like cartoons and the like). You have to do so using less than six comics total. Covers and pin-ups do not count – only actual appearances in the same comic book story (so it doesn’t count if they each appeared in separate stories inside the same anthology). Mythological characters and real people (by the way, unless a fake name is used for a real person, like Ronald Raygun or whatever, you can use the person even if they are not officially named in the comic) are unique to their own comic book appearances (so DC’s Thor is different than Marvel’s Thor, DC’s Ronald Reagan is different from Marvel’s Ronald Reagan, etc.). But a licensed character is the same in all of their various comic book companies (so the Marvel Red Sonja is the same as the Dynamite Red Sonja) and approved appearances by a real person can go across comic book companies, as well (so, for instance, you can use Marv Wolfman from his Teen Titans appearance to connect with Marv Wolfman in his Fantastic Four appearance). Approval tends to be the key (except for public figures, of course).

Every week, whoever connects the two characters in the least amount of turns gets to pick the next week’s match- (in the event of a tie, the winner is chosen randomly). Last week was ALF to Amy Pond. Eric Henry was the only one to connect the two in three moves, through a uniquely clever first connection (note that ALF was still a Marvel license in 1991). Here is how Eric connected the two…

Alf was in “The Infinity Gauntlet” #2 with Wolverine
Wolverine was in “Star Trek: The Next Generation/X-Men” with Data
Data was in “Star Trek: The Next Generation – Doctor Who: Assimilation 2″ with Amy Pond

Eric’s challenge is…

The Fat Fury to Galactus

E-mail me your answers at bcronin@comicbookresources.com. Do NOT post your answers in the comments section!

Whoever connects the two characters in the least amount of comics gets to pick the connection for next time around (I’ll pick a random winner in the event of a tie)!

Remember, only authorized appearances in comic books count (for instance, all the Marvel characters in Savage Dragon/Destroyer Duck do not count)!

15 Comments

Cool move from Eric on last week’s challenge!

I just want to be clear on this for the future: Alf doesn’t appear as a real character in Infinity Gauntlet #2, he appears as a fiction (on television). Since this counts, that opens the door to all sorts of stuff: Let’s say the Thing watches Casablanca (by name) and we see Bogart onscreen, then he counts as having shared an appearance with Rick? (Or does it only count if the publisher has the licence, even if the character isn’t named? )

I don’t think Eric Henry’s answer really qualifies… Even if Alf was a Marvel property, the Alf comics didn’t take place in the Marvel Universe. So what Pip sees on TV is not the Alf who appears in his eponymous comics, but a puppeteer playing “Alf” in a fictional TV show. So claiming that Alf appears in IG #2 is the equivalent of taking, say, a Batman comic where Bruce Wayne dresses up as Abraham Lincoln for Halloween, and saying Lincoln appears in it.

Oh, I see Stephane already made the same point while I was writing that…

I was thinking of ALF’s meeting with the High Evolutionary in ALF Annual 1. You could then use the High Evolutionary’s involvement in that “Powerless” story in 1999 to get to the X-Men, and from there basically as Eric had it. One more move, but still valid.

That ALF pick is going to be controversial; I always assumed they colored him blue to make a distinction of some kind. But, really, it does seem to open up a lot of questionable picks — if a Batman origin comic depicts Zorro in some way, I wouldn’t think of that as the same as even a DC published Zorro comic.

And here I thought that was pretty damn clever.

Street Wolf!?! Sweet lord above, where the hell did we dig that one from?

Or does it only count if the publisher has the licence, even if the character isn’t named?

Yes, only if the publisher has the license. It really does not open up things much at all. Note that Perez did not draw an ALF-like creature, he flat out drew ALF. He would not have drawn ALF unless Marvel had the license to do ALF comics. Which they did.

“Note that Perez did not draw an ALF-like creature, he flat out drew ALF. He would not have drawn ALF unless Marvel had the license to do ALF comics.”

What about when Terry Austin draws Popeye into a crowd scene? He’s not drawing a Popeye-like creature, he flat-out drew Popeye. This was not ALF the character, it was ALF the TV show.

What about when Terry Austin draws Popeye into a crowd scene? He’s not drawing a Popeye-like creature, he flat-out drew Popeye. This was not ALF the character, it was ALF the TV show.

If Marvel had the license to Popeye, sure. Just like how if Ren and Stimpy appeared in a Marvel comic while Marvel had the license, it would count. Heck, I believe we actually HAD that exact scenario earlier (Stimpy being a connector via an appearance in a Marvel comic while being licensed to Marvel).

OK, so that would mean that anytime that Archie is shown reading a Shield comic or seeing a Shield movie, that totally counts as them appearing in the same story, which I wouldn’t have thought before. It does make things easier, that’s for sure. That also means that the Question and Rorschach totally did appear in the same story once, which I was on the fence about before.

I was aware of the Infinity Gambit appearance but didn’t think it counted, so I went with the straight-up meeting with the High Evolutionary instead.

I actually submitted two answers and let Brian decide if the Infinity Gauntlet appearance counted. My other solution involved the High Evolutionary appearance in Alf Annual #1 and was a step longer.

But, in answer to Tuomas, surely the High Evolutionary’s appearance in the Alf Annual means that the Alf comics do take place in the Marvel Universe. Maybe the Alf TV series is some kind of documentary in the Marvel Universe.

For the record this was my answer
ALF to Amy Pond
ALF appeared in ALF Annual #1 with High Evolutionary.
High Evolutionary appeared in X-Men Annual #3 with X-Men.
X-Men appeared in Star Trek The Next Generation/X-Men: Second Contact
#1 with Captain Jean-Luc Picard.
Captain Jean-Luc Picard appeared in Star Trek: The Next
Generation/Doctor Who: Assimilation2 #1 with Amy Pond.

That Timber Wolf cover is just so 90s.

Try as I might, I can’t understand why people published such books back in the day. I wonder if that interaction of Timber Wolf sold at all well.

Timberwolf (and others) were probably published just to cash in on Wolverine’s popularity at the time.

Timber Wolf was a member of the Legion of Super-Heroes and predates Wolverine by a decade or so. At this point in his career, Timber Wolf had been mutated (long story) into looking like this (which is better than his “Sasquatch” phase in which he was called Furball). The mini-series was because he was EXTREME at the time.

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