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Flippin’ through Previews – April 2013

ballistici-issue1cover_darickrobertson (2)

I’m back on schedule, so let’s dig into Previews #295 and see what’s what!

People keep making Django Unchained jokes, but I just keep thinking of Unchained Melody for some reason

People keep making Django Unchained jokes, but I just keep thinking of Unchained Melody for some reason

Dark Horse:

Gerard Way is back with The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys (page 42), which he’s co-writing with Shaun Simon and which is drawn by Becky Cloonan. I’m sure it will be good, but I’ll still probably wait for the trade. (12 June)

Meanwhile, Sam Humphries’s Sacrifice gets published in a nice collection on page 44. I haven’t read this, so I don’t know if it’s any good – maybe someone can chime in? (21 August)

Ron Randall told me he was putting together a Trekker collection a year ago, and on page 45, the Omnibus shows up. This is another comic I’ve never read, so if you have any opinions about it, feel free to share. Like most Dark Horse Omnibuses, it’s 25 bucks for well over 300 pages, so it’s not a bad deal at all. (7 August)

She takes her love of Captain Kirk seriously!

She takes her love of Captain Kirk seriously!

If you waited for the trade of The Black Beetle by Francesco Francavilla, it’s offered on page 48. The final issue is a bit delayed, but so far, it’s been a very fun and pulpy comic with superb artwork. If you’re interested in that kind of thing. (14 August)

Over on page 77, we get Creepy Presents Steve Ditko, featuring Ditko stories from both Creepy and Eerie. I’m really enjoying all this Ditko stuff that’s been coming out recently – I’m still not the biggest fan of his art, but that doesn’t mean it’s not impressive to examine. (7 August)

So much craziness!

So much craziness!

DC:

So on pages 84-85 we get two new Superman books, Superman Unchained and Batman/Superman. This brings the number of Superman books in the DCnU to four (4) and the number of Batman books to one thousand eighty-six (1086). I don’t get the whole “unchained” thing, but I guess they had to call it something, and “Adventures of” doesn’t sound X-treeeeem enough for the DCnU, and other Batman/Superman team-up books have done well in the past, so … way to go, DC? (12 and 5 June, respectively)

I do have to give DC credit – they just keep throwing weird shit at the wall and hoping some of it will stick, as on pages 86-87, we get Larfleeze #1 (really?) and Pandora #1 (REALLY?). I doubt if either one of these will last much more than a year (if they’re lucky), but I do like how DC is digging through the war chest to find something to publish! (26 and 19 June, respectively)

Still plenty of rage, though!

Still plenty of rage, though!

There’s nothing to indicate that Batman, Incorporated #12 (page 101) is the final issue … I thought it was supposed to go only 12? Was I misled? Anyway, perhaps Morrison did his usual thing and decided that 12 issues could not contain his awesomeness! Will it go to issue #13, or even longer? (26 June)

“Zero Year” begins in Batman #21 (page 102). Blech. The idea isn’t too bad, but 13 issues? Jeebus. (12 June)

I’ve been enjoying All Star Western, mainly because DC seems to have left the creators alone and because it’s set in the 1880s, it doesn’t have too much to do with the DCnU in the present. So, of course, in issue #21 (page 118) … “Jonah Hex visits the 21st century!” Yeah. (26 June)

Batman Illustrated by Neal Adams volume 3 is offered in trade paperback on page 135. These are really, really good comics, in case you didn’t know, and the book culminates with “The Joker’s Five-Way Revenge,” which is a superb story. (31 July)

Also on page 135, Camelot 3000 gets a new trade paperback for only 20 dollars. This features beautiful Brian Bolland artwork and Mike Barr’s story is actually ahead of its time (despite being dated; the countries in AD 3000 remain the same as they were in the early 1980s). Read more about it here! (24 July)

Page 135 is a good place to be, because we also get Superman: Phantom Zone in trade, by Steve Gerber, Gene Colan, and Tony DeZuniga. Greg Hatcher has raved about this story before (I’m pretty sure Our Dread Lord and Master has, too), so here’s your chance to see what the fuss is about!

Poor Quex-Ul - he probably broke one of Krypton's fashion laws by wearing green and yellow after 'Krypton Day' or something - you know they'd frown on shit like that!

Poor Quex-Ul – he probably broke one of Krypton’s fashion laws by wearing green and yellow after ‘Krypton Day’ or something – you know they’d frown on shit like that!

Astro City is FINALLY back on page 139. Yay, Astro City! Yay, Kurt Busiek and Brent Anderson! Huzzah! Up next: A guest appearance by … let’s say Larfleeze. You know it’s coming! (5 June)

On page 142, we get Brother Lono #1, which takes place after the end of 100 Bullets. If you’re interested in that at all. I say let things lie, but what do I know? (19 June)

The trade of Beware the Creeper shows up on page 147. I guess it’s getting collected now because of Cliff Chiang’s higher profile, right? Anyway, it’s not a great story, but it’s not bad. And, of course, Chiang’s art is really good. (31 July)

DC keeps squeezing blood from the Sandman stone, as they offer an “Omnibus” of the first half of Sandman on page 147. 1040 pages for $150. It’s certainly not the worst deal, but I shudder to think how someone is going to carry that around or even read it when they’re lying in bed. (21 August)

IDW:

In the phenomenon of genre television shows continuing their “seasons” in comic book form, on page 160 we get X-Files Season 10 #1. No, it does not feature Agents Doggett and Reyes, but you know they’ll show up at some point, right? Come on, IDW, make it happen!

There’s a Xenozoic Tales: Artist’s Edition offered on page 162. As usual with all of these Artist’s Editions, I think HOLY CRAP and then move on, knowing I cannot afford it. But dang, I bet that’s absolutely gorgeous.

Superman: The Silver Age Newspaper Dailies volume 1 is offered on page 163. I don’t have a ton of interest in this, but IDW and the Library of American Comics do a really nice job with these books, so if you’re interested, they’re totally worth it.

The presence of the Earth's Super-Idiot does tempt me, though!

The presence of the Earth’s Super-Idiot does tempt me, though!

IDW took a look at Deadpool slaughtering his way through classic literature and decided they could do that too, so we get Mars Attacks: Classics Obliterated on page 178, which features three stories about Martians fighting characters from 19th-century literature. There’s some good talent on the book – Phil Hester, Beau Smith, Neil Kleid, John McCrea, Kelley Jones – and it’s only 8 bucks, so it might be worth a look!

Killogy gets a trade on page 184. It sounds nice and twisted – three murderers stuck in a zombie apocalypse, so I might have to check it out.

Image:

Honestly, the concept of Lazarus (page 194) – dystopian future ruled by oligarchic families, a protector of one who gets killed but doesn’t die – isn’t the greatest one. We’ve seen this kind of thing before. But … it’s by Greg Rucka and Michael Lark, so it’s definitely going to be worth a look! (26 June)

She could take some time to clean up - I mean, really!

She could take some time to clean up – I mean, really!

There are only 4 issues in the latest trade of Fatale, but it’s offered on page 199, if you’re interested. It remains a good but not great comic, and that’s perfectly fine with me. (5 June)

Meanwhile, Saga volume 2 is offered on page 206. I may be conflicted about the series, but it sure looks purty, I’ll give it that much! (19 June)

Change gets a trade on page 207. It’s a bizarre book that doesn’t quite pull itself together, but I love the ambition of the entire thing, and Ales Kot almost gets away with it. It’s certainly worth your ducats. (26 June)

The first volume of A Distant Soil gets a new edition on page 208. I’ve never read this – I suppose I should probably start. (5 June)

Is there some reason why she's cradling a planet like it's her baby?

Is there some reason why she’s cradling a planet like it’s her baby?

I didn’t read Infinite Vacation, so I can’t say if the big hardcover on page 209 is worth the 25 bucks you will pay for it, but there it is. (19 June)

Moriarty was a pretty solid comic, and it’s pretty cool that Daniel Corey and Anthony Diecidue were able to collect it in a fancy, 9-issue hardcover for only 30 bucks on page 209. It’s kind of a shame the book couldn’t last longer, but at least you can get a nice book out of it! (5 June)

On page 211, we get Spawn: The Dark Ages Complete Collection hardcover for 60 bucks (it’s 700 pages, though). I can’t imagine this is worth a look, but if you’re really keen on it, that’s not a bad price for that much comicbookery. (26 June)

The fact that this exists makes me giddy, because it proves once again that COMIX R AWESUM!!!!

The fact that this exists makes me giddy, because it proves once again that COMIX R AWESUM!!!!

Witch Doctor: Mal Practice gets a trade on page 213. This is a really good series, so if you’ve missed the single issues, check this sucker out. (19 June)

Marvel:

I love Marvel because they just can’t let things go, can they? On page 2, we get Age of Ultron #10 (of 10). On page 3, we get Age of Ultron #10A.I. What the fuck, Marvel? What the fucking fuck? Jeebus, just fucking end it. END IT!!!!! (19 and 26 June, respectively)

Hank Pym's moisturizing mask: You're doing it wrong

Hank Pym’s moisturizing mask: You’re doing it wrong

So, the gang in Uncanny Avengers is experiencing Ragnarök (page 4). Is that different from the other Marvel “Ragnaroks” because of the umlaut? Couldn’t a Marvel editor have said something like, “You know, Remender, Marvel’s had something like 17 Ragnaroks in the past dozen years. Ease back, okay?” I mean, can’t they use a different world-ending myth? There are pantheons all over the place, you know! (19 June)

Guardians of the Galaxy #4 (page 14): No Steve McNiven. Bwah-ha-ha-ha! Now, it’s Sara Pichelli on art, who’s definitely no slacker, but that still cracks me up. (26 June)

So, why did Marvel even launch Savage Wolverine? It’s not a Frank Cho book, as Zeb Wells and (bwah-ha-ha-ha!) Joe Madureira take over with issue #6 (page 16). Is it like Legends of the Dark Knight? if Marvel named it Legends of the Savage Wolverine, that would have been pretty cool. (12 June)

How does Logan even close his mouth?

How does Logan even close his mouth?

Marvel must have called DC to see what the secret of their success is, as the solicitation for Thanos Rising #3 (page 22) tells us it’s “so blood-soaked you’ll be glad it’s a mini-series.” Charming! (5 June)

Jamie McKelvie is a foul, evil liar (he knows why!), and so Kate Brown guest-arts Young Avengers #6 on page 26. It looks pretty cool, actually. And I’m sure the story will be groovy. (26 June)

Marvel actually launches a “Legends of the Man Without Fear” comic with Daredevil: Dark Nights (see what they did there?) on page 55. Lee Weeks, who really should get more work, leads off, and I really don’t know if this is an 8-issue arc or if each issue will be a different one-off story. I suppose I could search that out, but I’m not gonna. Deal with it! Weeks is a really good artist, but who knows how he is as a writer? (5 June)

Lee Weeks is boss, yo

Lee Weeks is boss, yo

So when Marvel teases “The End of X-Factor” in X-Factor #257 and 258 (page 62), does that really mean the book is ending? I mean, we know the instant Peter David stops writing it Marvel will probably cancel it, but is that what David’s up to? Who knows, man! All I know is that I wish Neil Edwards weren’t drawing this. It’s kind of depressing that he seems to be getting worse. (5 and 19 June)

This is weird: Marvel is publishing The Tower Chronicles: Geisthawk in a “premiere hardcover” on page 73. It’s just weird because Marvel didn’t publish the single issues. And nowhere does this mention that it’s being published in conjunction with Legendary, which originally put it out. Odd. Anyway, this is 35 bucks, which is a dollar less than the four issues cost, and while it’s not a great comic, it is wildly entertaining, with excellent Bisley artwork. It also has a fair amount of bad language, gruesome violence and nudity, yet Marvel rates it “T+.” Has it been censored? The mind reels!!!! (17 July)

At least they let Bisley draw the cover

At least they let Bisley draw the cover

Inhumans by Paul Jenkins and Jae Lee is being reprinted in a nice hardcover (page 76). It’s 40 bucks, but it is 12 issues, so there’s that. This is a phenomenal series with stunning artwork, and it’s one of those Jemas-era Marvel books where anything seemed possible. It was also one of those books that made it seem that Jenkins was going to be a huge star, and that never really worked out. Anyway, if you haven’t read it yet, you should. It’s keen. (4 September)

Daredevil: End of Days gets a hardcover on page 77. I’m certainly tempted by this, but I might wait for the softcover version. (3 July)

Larry Hama’s well-regarded run on Wolverine gets a trade on page 100, with some other stuff added on. I might have to pick this one up. I bought Bloodlust, which was the first time (I think) I read a comic written by Alan Davis, and it remains one of my favorite Wolverine stories. I know – cool story, bro. (26 June)

Hulk: From the Marvel UK Vaults is offered on page 102, with a ton of very good British talent from the late 1970s/early 1980s. I don’t know how good this is, but it’s probably pretty neat-o. (26 June)

Let’s move on from the “premier” publishers to … the back of the book!

The Strangers in Paradise Omnibus shows up on page 242. $100 for the entire epic. That’s not bad. I figure it’s about time to get this, so I can drop a hundy on it, can’t I?

That's a big bugger

That’s a big bugger

Alterna Comics puts out Michael May and Jason Copland’s Kill All Monsters on page 244. I own the trade, but I haven’t reviewed it yet. I will, I swear it!!!!

I can’t imagine I’d ever want to read Poison Elves, but Ape Entertainment has collected all 20 issues from the early 1990s on page 250. If you’ve ever wondered what it was all about, here’s your chance to find out!

On page 256, Archaia has a hardcover of Mouse Guard: The Black Axe, which is a typically excellent installment in David Petersen’s epic. Check it out!

Black Mask Comics has Ballistic (page 280), which is written by the excellently-named Adam Egypt Mortimer and drawn by Darick Robertson. It’s a “madcap sci-fi buddy adventure about a wanna-be bank robber and best-friend [sic] Gun, a drug-addicted, foul-mouthed, living gun.” Sure, it sounds like something that came about after too much absinthe down at the hipster hookah bar, but Robertson’s art is usually worth a look.

Angry gun is angry

Angry gun is angry

Speaking of ideas that came about after too much absinthe down at the hipster hookah bar, on page 291 Simon Spurrier and Jeff Stokely drop Six-Gun Gorilla on us, which comes from Boom! Spurrier is a good writer, and Stokely appears to be a good artist (I’ve only seen a little of his work), but a “bio-surgically modified silverback gorilla toting a pair of enormous revolvers”? Sigh.

Boom!’s kid’s section, Kaboom!, has a new Herobear and the Kid from Mike Kunkel on page 297. I still haven’t read any of this comic, but it has a good reputation out there in the comics world!

Fantagraphics has its usual assortment of cool stuff, including Run Like Crazy Run Like Hell by Jacques Tardi and Jean-Patrick Manchette on page 328 and Creeping Death from Neptune: Horror and Science Fiction Comics by Basil Wolverton. The first is sure to be good because both Tardi and Manchette are good, while Wolverton’s odd art fits a horror/science fiction blend pretty well.

On page 334 Humanoids has Beirut 1990: Snapshots of a Civil War. Two Frenchmen, Bruno and Sylvain Ricard, went to Beirut in that year and later collaborated with artist Christophe Gaultier to create a graphic novel about their experience. Sounds keen.

Get a real job, slackers!

Get a real job, slackers!

There’s a new Atomic Robo mini-series from Red 5 on page 347. That’s it. NOTHING MORE NEEDS TO BE SAID!

Well, I would write more, but Previews seems to run out of steam after that, with nothing really jumping out at me. That doesn’t mean there isn’t cool stuff to find! Sorry that the back of the book section was a little thin this month – there’s plenty of stuff I’m going to order, but it seems like a lot of it is stuff I’ve already mentioned. So do some of your own digging, and I’m sure you’ll find some gems! Have a nice day, everyone!

40 Comments

Lee Weeks wrote the Spider-Man: Death and Destiny miniseries a decade or so back. It’s really good.

Holy crap, The Phantom Zone! That was a great mini. Now if they’d just reprint the Colan run on Wonder Woman…

It’s hilarious to me that IDW gets to publish Superman stories.

I really enjoy this column. Great job.

I love DC, but man I’m shaking my head at what they are putting out here lately.

Marvel kills me with their bait and switch tactics with artists. “It’s all planned out” and “long term vision,” whatever. McNiven will not return to GoG, he will launch the next Avengers related product next year. It has been TWO YEARS since Joe Mad was supposed to be back on Avenging Spiderman. The only one who can keep up is Immonen, who is a cyborg apparently.

A Distant Soil is pretty spiffy.

I coulda sworn the Jenkins/Lee Inhumans was a pre-Jemas Marvel Knights project.

Tom Fitzpatrick

March 30, 2013 at 11:33 am

Another “Flippin’ through Previews” blog. By none other than the legendary, epicsome, awesome, incomparable, irreplacable, irascible, mythological Burgas of CBR.

It has been far, far, too long since we’ve read about your snippy, snide, sarcastic remarks about this or that.

And STILL no mention of Fantastic Four John Byrne Omnibus Vol. 2.
You’re right, MARVEL’s out to get all of us!

“And nowhere does this mention that it’s being published in conjunction with Legendary, which originally put it out.”

Except for, you know, the Legendary logo on the cover you posted…

Weeks is a really good artist, but who knows how he is as a writer?

One good thing about the old Marvel Method (although I don’t know if they use it anymore at Marvel) is that the artist had so much input in the plotting and how a story was told that you could tell pretty easily which artists would make good writers (well, plotters at least). So given Lee Weeks old school Marvel work, I feel safe in thinking he may at least have the plotting part of writing down. No guarantees as to how he’ll do on the dialoguing.

Rob: Interesting. I’ve never heard of that, but it’s good to know!

buttler: Well, it does seem like they’re getting around to reprinting a lot of their old stories, so fingers crossed!

Adam: Thanks! And yeah, I really don’t like that Marvel does that. I mean, why launch a series and make a big deal about the artist when you know the artist will be gone pretty quickly? It’s kind of annoying.

Michael: Inhumans came out in 1998 (I think), so yeah, it was before Jemas became the driving force of the company. But he was still high up in the company then, for what that’s worth. I probably misspoke, though (miswrote?)

Tom: Well, I did just publish one a few weeks ago, so it hasn’t been that long … :)

Pedro: Oh sure, be all technical and shit! :) I meant that the solicits don’t mention anything about it, and I’m curious why. I assume Legendary has some kind of deal with Marvel, like DC did with IDW to publish those Superman strips, but the solicit acts like it’s always been a Marvel book. It’s just weird.

T.: Yeah, good point about the Marvel Method. I don’t think they use it too much anymore, but I assume they still did 20 years ago, when Weeks was making his bones, so he probably does know how to plot a book. You’re right, though – dialogue is always tricky. Of course, it’s tricky for writers who aren’t naturally artists, as well, so there’s that.

Personally, I’m kind of looking forward to Larfleeze, mostly because it’s another Giffen and Dematteis collaboration.

I thought it was supposed to go only 12? Was I misled? Anyway, perhaps Morrison did his usual thing and decided that 12 issues could not contain his awesomeness! Will it go to issue #13, or even longer?

Morrison has confirmed many times that 12 will be HIS last issue. I imagine the series will continue in his absence, since it just saw a massive sales spike from Damian’s demise.

I didn’t read Infinite Vacation, so I can’t say if the big hardcover on page 209 is worth the 25 bucks you will pay for it, but there it is.

It is not. The dialogue tries very hard to be clever, and there’s a lot of sound and fury, but midstream it seems like Nick Spencer himself realizes that he has nothing to say with Infinite Vacation other than “true love is awesome.” Still, Christian Ward does some interesting things with color and photography. Flip through it in any case, but I would still caution against investing any money or time.

Lee Weeks, who really should get more work, leads off, and I really don’t know if this is an 8-issue arc or if each issue will be a different one-off story. I suppose I could search that out, but I’m not gonna. Deal with it! Weeks is a really good artist, but who knows how he is as a writer?

I’m thrilled about this series. Weeks’ “Fall of the Kingpin” with Dan Chichester is my Born Again. I read it first and around the same time as stories like “Kraven’s Last Hunt.” These and others taught me that cape comics were serious business, and therefore it was okay for me to keep reading them through high school. Seeing Weeks return to Daredevil, I feel like I imagine most people of the appropriate age felt when they heard Frank Miller was writing a new Batman series (before seeing the results, I mean).

Also, Weeks has written before. He wrote and drew a Spider-Man miniseries in 2000 called Death and Destiny. To give you an idea, it had roughly the same tone and storytelling sensibility of a Paul Jenkins comic of that era. As with others of that sort, the story was hampered by an over-reliance on “emo noir” captions (to borrow a phrase from commenter T.), as well as some clunkiness in Weeks’ prose style. Hopefully, he’s tightened that up over the years, or maybe Stephen Wacker will step in to help out in that department.

Oh no, I said his name! Uhhh, quick – everyone chant “Bloody Mary.” Maybe we can cancel it out!

Randy: According to Previews, it’s Giffen only. That could be good, but Giffen is so much better at plotting than writing dialogue, it’s usually not. It would be great if it were Giffen/DeMatteis, but it doesn’t look like it is.

Cass: Blech. I was hoping DC would have some restraint and cancel the book when Morrison was done. I guess not. The solicit doesn’t even say “MORRISON’S LAST ISSUE!” or anything, which is also why I wondered if he was done.

Thanks for the recommendation about Infinite Vacation. Spencer can run hot or cold with me, so I wasn’t sure about this.

Yeah, the Chichester/Weeks stuff on Daredevil (issues #292-300) are as good as any on the comic. It’s too bad Chichester went insane after issue #300!

Also, Weeks has written before. He wrote and drew a Spider-Man miniseries in 2000 called Death and Destiny. To give you an idea, it had roughly the same tone and storytelling sensibility of a Paul Jenkins comic of that era. As with others of that sort, the story was hampered by an over-reliance on “emo noir” captions (to borrow a phrase from commenter T.), as well as some clunkiness in Weeks’ prose style. Hopefully, he’s tightened that up over the years, or maybe Stephen Wacker will step in to help out in that department.

Interesting. How was the plotting at least?

@greg
No, Giffen and JMD are doing it together. Here:http://www.newsarama.com/comics/giffen-dematteis-larfleeze-co-writing-interview.html

Also, I’ve heard some rumors about Batman Inc supposedly being handed over to Chris Burnham from Morrison after his run is done.

Randy: Man, that’s weird. I wonder why DC doesn’t list it in the solicitations. You’d think that would be something people would want to know. Maybe DeMatteis came on after they had sent the solicitation information to Diamond? I doubt it, because two weeks later, when the solicits went up on-line, Giffen’s was still the only name attached. Bizarre. But you’re right – this might actually be kind of fun with those two working on it.

As for giving it to Burnham … that might work, but I’ll have to wait and see.

@T: I honestly can’t remember. I’m looking through my longbox of Spider-Man miniseries, and much to my own surprise, it looks like I sold that one off. That probably means the plotting, if it was any good, still wasn’t good enough to outweigh my problems with the writing style, which is what stuck in my mind after all this time. Spiderfan has a review with plot summary below, maybe that will given you an idea.

http://spiderfan.org/comics/title/spiderman_death_destiny.html

@Greg: Oh yeah, he TOTALLY lost his mind after 300. I bought 301-307 in a chunk at a convention, thinking I would be in for a treat. I never made it past that first Cyborg Owl storyline. No exaggeration, those were easily some of the worst comics I’ve ever read in my life. I couldn’t believe it was the same guy.

I enjoyed Trekker – good story and art

I’m guessing the Hulk : from the Marvel UK vaults is reprints of the UK material done for Hulk Weekly (which was gradually replaced by reprints of American material).
One of the short hulk stories had John Bolton art but that is the best thing about the hulk stories
The Nick Fury stories from Hulk weekly (Steve Dillon art) were better
The Black Knight and Night Raven stories have already been reprinted

John: According to the solicits, the Hulk book has stuff from Hulk Comic and some other sources, too. Writers include Steve Moore and Steve Parkhouse, while the artists are Gibbons, Dillon, Bolton, Neary, and Lloyd. So there’s that.

I’ve been slowly making my way through every Daredevil comic ever, and I’m currently at the Miller years. It will take me a while to get to Daredevil #300-307, but you guys have me really curious now!

Page 135 is a good place to be, because we also get Superman: Phantom Zone in trade, by Steve Gerber, Gene Colan, and Tony DeZuniga. Greg Hatcher has raved about this story before (I’m pretty sure Our Dread Lord and Master has, too), so here’s your chance to see what the fuss is about!

I hear a lot of raves about this book too so I will check it out, but I always worry because when a lot of people mean when they say a Superman comic from the bronze age or silver age is good, what they mean is it’s good by the standards of Weisinger-era or Schwartz-era Superman, both of which I think are terrible eras. I think the original pre-Weisinger Superman and the post-Crisis Superman are the only two good eras of Superman with everything in between largely being a vast wasteland. I liked Kirby’s Fourth World stuff, but I only marginally count that as a Superman book.

Yet I’ll still give this a try, because I love Gerber and Colan.

Well, at the risk of belaboring the obvious, I imagine it’s “unchained” because of the iconic images of Superman busting through chains (Superman #11, Superman #233, and so on). Not that it’s a GOOD title, but I can kind of see where it’s coming from.

@buttler
I’m looking forward to Snyder/Lee’s Superman series, and I get where the “unchained” is coming from, but I really don’t get why they didn’t just call it Superman: Man of Steel to tie in with the new film. I mean, they both have Snyder’s (Zack and Scott) you’d think they would try to trick a few people into thinking that “Hey, The director of the new superman movie is also writing a Superman comic!”. Then again, maybe, they didn’t want to cause too much confusion, or maybe they were afraid that the film would suck, and were afraid it might be bad for marketing? Oh, well, it’s just a dumb title, and plenty of comics have had dumb titles that turn out good, so, eh.

If you really think the only thing The Infinite Vacation says is ‘true love is awesome,’ you certainly have my sympathies.

I probably shouldn’t add that the main message of Morning Glories seems to be “don’t go away to prep school”, then, should I? ;)

I kid, I kid. I dig the book, and 25 was dang neato. Although the vast web of conspiracies make-a my haid hurt!

I hope Infinite Vacay comes out in trade, as 25 bucks is a bit pricey.

Greg, I’m not saying your slam on Six-Gun Gorilla is unfounded as being a wild idea, but it wasn’t exactly dreamed up by a hipster in a hookah bar:

io9.com/5945916/read-the-lost-adventures-of-six+gun-gorilla-the-greatest-cowboy-gorilla-in-fiction\
———-
“Six-Gun Gorilla” originally appeared as a fifteen-part serial in the British story paper Wizard in 1939. Anonymously-written [...] Six-Gun Gorilla would have been consigned to the dung heap of pop culture history if not for E.S. Turner and his Boys Will Be Boys (1948), the landmark account of British magazine popular culture.
———-
So yeah, it’s actually relaunch of an anonymously written pulp story from the 30s. I’m excited by the creative team so I’m planning on giving it a shot!

T.: Yeah, I hope the Superman story is good, too. I’m certainly willing to give it a chance!

The Daredevil issues are so weird. Chichester’s first 9 issues are so good, and then immediately they turn around in quality. It’s not really that slow a slide – it begins pretty much with issue #301, the one after he finished his Fall of the Kingpin story arc. It’s really weird. I bought the book until issue #325, and those two years are almost unreadable, to the point where it’s hard to believe Chichester wrote issues #292-300, because those are so good.

Jeff: Well, it could have been a 1930s hipster in a hookah bar – they had hookahs in the ’30s, right? :)

Louis Bright-Raven

March 30, 2013 at 10:49 pm

I’m getting the TREKKER omnibus, and I’ve already got most of the original issues. But, if you haven’t read it, Greg, the easiest way to rectify that problem is to go to Ron’s TREKKER website and sample it online. http://trekkercomic.com/

And I guess if you’ve never read A DISTANT SOIL, now’s the time to get started, yeah. I’m not getting this edition because you know, I’ve got the originals from the Starblaze and Aria Press years. Yeah, I know Colleen Doran’s ‘remastered’ things (again)… honestly I’m just wanting her to finish the story.

I’m getting the 7 volume set of BONEYARD by Richard Moore from NBM. Mainly so I can get rid of my singles, as I started reading them and then no comics shop would order them for me.

But yeah, outside of my usual Mignolaverse and DHP, this was it. (Oh wait… I think there was the last issue of the latest PERHAPANAUTS miniseries, too.)

Query, Greg: You ever buy comics off IndyPlanet.com? Just curious.

Worth mentioning is the return of Sergio Aragones’ Funnies from Bongo. It’s been on hiatus for over a year because of Aragones recovering from surgery. Its return also hopefully signals a resolicitation of the Conan Vs. Groo comic from Dark Horse that was also delayed by his medical problems…

And I agree, that Xenozoic Tales Artist Edition looks AMAZING. I reluctantly passed over some of the previous volumes (most regrettably the Stevens Rocketeer and the Aragones Groo volumes) but this just might be the one to get me to splurge. I just HATE how IDW only gives “PI” as the price. Just tell us already!

As I understand it with those IDW Artist Edition books, IDW was selling them at 100 bucks, but apparently wanted to give stores the option in pricing them, so they stopped giving a specific price, so stores could set their own. Depending on how cool your comics shop guy is, you might be able to get it for a deec price. I’m regretting passing up the Mad and EC ones, and then I saw there was a Spirit one too! Augh!

More babbling in a bit.

I really think you should read infinite vacation. I think it ‘s a really great and bizzare comic with a nice concept and amazing art . I was really impressed. It suffered from shipping problems that got it off the radar i think.

Nothing really popping out at me from your list, which is good in a way, as I have too damn many comics on deck as it is! But Trekker sounds good, ADS is a maybe (I think I have the first trade, I’ll have to see what’s in the one I have), I like that Louis mentioned Boneyard, as that’s a cool series. Is that Phantom Zone book just the mini, cuz I have issues 2-4 (cheapo bins rule!), but I thought I heard there’s a follow up issue.

Killogy was decent for the first 2 issues, at least. Issue 3 is at one of my local stores, but I haven’t yet picked it up. Some interesting imagery, although the artwork IS pretty rough. The one guy is modeled after Marky Ramone, though, so that’s cool!

As to the Ditko book, I’d have to check http://www.srbissette.com again, as Bissette has been featuring posts about Ditko et al, and has mentioned that in reprinting Ditko’s work, some people aren’t paying Ditko anything (while using him as THE selling point). Gotta check about the Creepy book, hope he’s getting something. But to support Ditko more directly, there’s a Kickstarter up for him, and I think I’ll go for it my own self. http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1704592942/the-ditko-public-service-package

Steve Moore wrote Marvel UK’s Nick Fury stories, Parkhouse wrote some hulk stories including the Bolton one.
Moore, Neary and Lloyd also did Hulk stories (Don’t remember Gibbons involved but he could have done a short Hulk story)
David Lloyd and John Bolton did Night Raven’s art
The Black Knight stories were recently reprinted in Captain Britain volumes (as he co-starred)
(Ant-Man and Eternals were also in Hulk weekly but were reprints of American material)
the stories were in 3 page episodes …so that’s only 3 pages of Bolton on the hulk…

On Xenozoic Tales, what I really want is the next issue…

Louis: I zipped over the Boneyard stuff, but I did notice it. Maybe someday I’ll read it …

I’ve never bought anything from IndyPlanet. I’ve never really felt the need. My retailer is usually good about getting me stuff, and he gives his customers a pretty good discount. If I miss something, I usually go to Amazon (yeah, I know) and I’ve bought some stuff from CheapGraphicNovels.com. I know I should try to find stuff that doesn’t show up in Previews more diligently, but that’s what conventions are for, I reckon.

Andrew: I missed Aragones returning to work. Thanks for pointing it out.

Mike: I may check Infinite Vacation out – I’m still thinking about it – but that price is tough. It seems really high.

Travis: Man, that sucks about Ditko. Jeebus – can’t any companies do anything right?

Captain Haddock

April 1, 2013 at 9:47 am

That Inhumans series was awesome. It was one of the comics that made me a fan back in the 90s and that Jae Lee art still looks as good today as it did 15 years ago (jeez, time flies). And Jenkins may not have hit the stratoshphere but he saved Hulk and Spiderman after the disastorous Byrne (and Mackie) reboots of the early 00′s. Seriously, compare the quality of work between the first few issues of Hulk/Spidey with Jenkins’ issues, the difference is astonishing.

• I’d be much more inclined to read the new X-Files series if it featured Doggett and Reyes. Annabeth Gish, man. Annabeth Gish.

* Yeah, Neil Edwards probably needs to be relegated to movie and video game tie-ins until he sorts out his style. What happened to Leonard Kirk?

• After the lackluster Flying She-Devils and the mediocre-at-best Real Science Adventures, I’ve decided to trade-wait Atomic Robo projects. I don’t want to turn my back on the series entirely, but my enthusiasm has definitely waned.

Andrew Collins

April 2, 2013 at 12:54 am

@Travis
Checked with my retailer and he says the Xenozoic collection from IDW has a price tag of $150, so it’s a little higher than most of the others and is even MORE outside my price range than normal…

Travis Pelkie

April 3, 2013 at 3:14 am

The ads popping up here at the site are saying that Batman Inc. is concluding the Damian/INC storyline in issues 9-13 with both Morrison and Burnham’s names, so probably much like Action, GMozz needed another issue to wrap things up.

When the series continues, they should totally change the outlook and the name to Batman Ink, about a group of characters with Bat-tats who fight crime and shit. Hells yeah!

Further to my earlier comments on the Hulk stories in Hulk weekly I felt there was a lack of vision from the creators as to what they were doing.
Night Raven was a pulp-style crimefighter, Black Knight was Sword and Sorcery, Nick Fury/SHIELD was secret agent – each with their own defined genre
meanwhile, the Hulk was…
wandering around Florida getting into fights with alligators, bears and the occasional man with a shotgun
…later in the series they did a multi-parter in which he was taken to a “monster-island”
and then they abandoned the UK stories and switched to reprints (starting off with the Hulk annual with the classic marvel monsters)

Lazarus by Rucka and Lark?!? Yes please!!! Can’t wait! :)

Superman Unchained $5 and Superman/Batman $4 and both 32pgs? Fuck off DC. Won’t buy Marvel’s overpriced and overly decompressed crap, not gonna buy yours either.

The worst decompression writer at the moment has to be Snyder. His first arc on Batman took a year, now his newest is another year?!? $48 for one story? Way to go Snyder!

Neil Edwards on X-Factor? Damn! He made my favourite writer (Parker) seem mediocre when he was put on Dark Avengers. I’m guessing the same will happen here. Thanks Marvel….

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Thanks for finally talking about >Flippin? through Previews – April 2013 | Comics Should Be Good!
@ Comic Book Resources <Loved it!

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