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Comics Should Be Good 2013 March Madness: Elite Eight

It is the elite eight round of the CSBG’s Fifth Annual March Madness tournament!

Here is how the bracket looks like so far…

Bracket8

Here are links to each of the four regions where you can vote for the winners of Round 4!

Danger Room Region

X-Mansion Region

Baxter Building Region

Watchtower Region

9 Comments

Such a close contest in Xmansion and danger room that I’ m flipping my votes between rounds (i.e. voting for the team that beat the team I voted for instead of continuing to support a team I did vote for…)

I’m confused to why Lee/Ditko on ASM isn’t represented on the bracket. Do the folks at CSBG just dislike spidey? He isn’t represented at all in the bracket.

Is it okay that I think it’s blasphemy to have Claremont/Cockrum 1st X-Men win out over Wolfman/Perez Titans?

Dave C: This entire tournament is only for team books. So yes, it’s because everybody hates Spidey. He’s a menace!

@buttler : nice response :-)

Check it out –the final four do not derive from ‘comic book events’ or ‘cross overs’ or ‘cross-branding’ of character-based assets in response to a buyout or big budget movie release.

If Claremont/Byrne wins -just the fact that they made the final four is marvelously significant, this is benchmark for how far the X-Men ‘franchise’ has disposed of what made it work in the first place http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=44388 Chris Clarmont:
** “For me, the whole idea was that the number was small enough that they could be expunged if the world got determined about it. You know, that it was something that the Avengers, if they wanted, could deal with. That was what gave Magneto so much of his passion and focus. In terms of defending his people, they really were dancing along the edge of extinction and they really did need someone like him. The difference, and the reason that the school was so intent on remaining clandestine, was that if they were exposed, they could be destroyed.

Obviously, in Grant Morrison’s ["New X-Men"] arc, that all changed. Suddenly mutants were a vast quantity in the human environment, even after “House of M” and Wanda saying, “No more mutants.” The company has found itself — [out] of necessity — forced to find a way to repeal that edict.

Now, unfortunately for me as a reader, you have a situation where the X-Men are totally public, where they’re now merging with all the other teams. The series, the concept, has lost its uniqueness. That which made it fundamentally different from the Fantastic Four, from the Avengers, from even the Defenders — it’s now just another group of committed superheroes. Some of them work with the Avengers, some of them work with the Fantastic Four, some of the Fantastic Four work with them. It’s all one big, homogeneous agglomeration, which, for me as a reader, is not that interesting, sadly.” **

The remaining three creator teams in the chart are rare oasis’s in consumer land. Today we use this chart to celebrate the beauty of this medium; the eye-catching fusion of drawing and writing that expresses influential thought provoking forms characterization, quality art and cutting edge storytelling. Today – while the price of gasoline rises, and our purchasing power (the value of the dollar) diminishes each year, yet we still spend $4.00+ per issue on stories that are still repetitive predictable plot lines, stereotype characterization, and characters that are still only able to wear primary colors. Today we mainly have a culmination stories written to comply with christian/conservative extremist red scare tactics (the comic book code authority), stories that catered to the speculators bubble in the mid-80’s until early-90’s (quantity of titles over general quality of storytelling, halo-foil covers, mutants for everyone! Look Super-man is dead (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0PlwDbSYicM), cloak and dagger suddenly became mutants, and hey look every cover either says ‘first issue!!!’), and decisions based upon a bankrupt management (Marvel in ’95). By the way, the best thing about that bankruptcy was the regime change that brought NuMarvel (~2000 – until Civil War).

Lets create a chart that is like this but for the past 10 years. Comics should be good.

@buttler : nice response
Check it out –the final four do not derive from ‘comic book events’ or ‘cross overs’ or ‘cross-branding’ of character-based assets in response to a buyout or big budget movie release.
If Claremont/Byrne wins -just the fact that they made the final four is marvelously significant, this is benchmark for how far the X-Men ‘franchise’ has disposed of what made it work in the first place -please see Chris Claremont’s comments at http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=44388

The remaining three creator teams in the chart are rare oasis’s in consumer land. Today we use this chart to celebrate the beauty of this medium; the eye-catching fusion of drawing and writing that expresses influential thought provoking forms characterization, quality art and cutting edge storytelling. Today – while the price of gasoline rises, and our purchasing power (the value of the dollar) diminishes each year, yet we still spend $4.00+ per issue on stories that are still repetitive predictable plot lines, stereotype characterization, and characters that are still only able to wear primary colors. Today we mainly have a culmination stories written to comply with christian/conservative extremist red scare tactics (the comic book code authority), stories that catered to the speculators bubble in the mid-80’s until early-90’s (quantity of titles over general quality of storytelling, halo-foil covers, mutants for everyone! Look Super-man is dead (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0PlwDbSYicM), cloak and dagger suddenly became mutants, and hey look every cover either says ‘first issue!!!’), and decisions based upon a bankrupt management (Marvel in ’95). By the way, the best thing about that bankruptcy was the regime change that brought NuMarvel (~2000 – until Civil War).

Lets start by trying to create a chart that is like this but for the past 10 years. Comics should be good. Why read comics that are written for consumers, when we can vote with our spending and time on stories that are written for quality over profit.

Just voted in the Watchmen vs. JLA match and feel awful, and would’ve felt just as awful if I’d voted the other way.

Remembering reading Watchmen #1 and JLA #1, they were remarkably similar reactions of sheer enthusiasm at a sea change for comics at that point. It’s hard to choose, do I vote for the 80s bold new direction, or the 90s bold new direction that brought us back from the self-parodying dead-end that corrupted the 80s direction?

Also hard to choose between 41 issues of consistent enjoyment, albeit with ups and downs, vs. 12 laser-focused issues of brilliance…

Interested in seeing how this one plays out…

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