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Comic Book Six Degrees: Miss Fury to Deathcry

I name two comic book characters. You then have to connect the two using only shared appearances in comic books (official appearances in comics only – no cameos like Terry Austin sneaking Popeye into the background of a panel and no outside comic book appearances, like cartoons and the like). You have to do so using less than six comics total. Covers and pin-ups do not count – only actual appearances in the same comic book story (so it doesn’t count if they each appeared in separate stories inside the same anthology). Mythological characters, public domain characters (other than public domain comic book characters, they’re free game) and real people (by the way, unless a fake name is used for a real person, like Ronald Raygun or whatever, you can use the person even if they are not officially named in the comic) are unique to their own comic book appearances (so DC’s Thor is different than Marvel’s Thor, DC’s Ronald Reagan is different from Marvel’s Ronald Reagan, etc.). But a licensed character is the same in all of their various comic book companies (so the Marvel Red Sonja is the same as the Dynamite Red Sonja) and approved appearances by a real person can go across comic book companies, as well (so, for instance, you can use Marv Wolfman from his Teen Titans appearance to connect with Marv Wolfman in his Fantastic Four appearance). Approval tends to be the key (except for public figures, of course).

Every week, whoever connects the two characters in the least amount of turns gets to pick the next week’s match (in the event of a tie, the winner is chosen randomly). Last week was X-O Manowar to X-Wing Rogue Leader (Wedge Antilles). A few people got it in five moves. The original fellow who I randomly picked as the winner never got back to me with his challenge, though, so I had to go to a back-up. Eric Henry was one of the people who got it in five moves, and since Eric had a few suggestions that I never used (since he did not win that week), I just chose one his old suggestions. First, here is how Eric connected the two…

X-O Manowar was in “X-O Manowar/Iron Man: In Heavy Metal” with Baron Zemo
Baron Zemo was in “Thunderbolts Presents: Zemo: Born Better” #3 with Adolf Hitler
Adolf Hitler was in “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” with Indiana Jones
Indiana Jones was in “Star Wars Tales” #19 with Chewbacca
Chewbacca was in “Star Wars: X-Wing Rogue Squadron” #28 with Wege Antilles

Eric’s challenge is…

Miss Fury to Deathcry

E-mail me your answers at bcronin@comicbookresources.com. Do NOT post your answers in the comments section!

Whoever connects the two characters in the least amount of comics gets to pick the connection for next time around (I’ll pick a random winner in the event of a tie)!

Remember, only authorized appearances in comic books count (for instance, all the Marvel characters in Savage Dragon/Destroyer Duck do not count)!

9 Comments

Brian,

Oh, ok…you DID count the Star Wars/Indiana Jones crossover. That was the one I was dying to ask you about last week, as I could see argument that it wasn’t “official.” Sheesh! I was going crazy trying to use the Indiana Jones connection and couldn’t find any evidence that he even had a remote crossover with Marvel. I even tried using the “Assistant Editor’s Month” issue, but the editor who appeared in that issue only showed up in a one-page story that was separate from the main Indy title.

For the record, the only other Star Wars crossover comic that I know of was an online-only issue with the Soul Calibur video game characters (http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Star_Wars:_Visions_of_the_Blade). However, I couldn’t find any links from Soul Calibur to the Marvel Universe, or anything in-between. I even desperately tried to find whether the official Lego Club magazine had the Star Wars characters meeting any other licensees…argh!

“Baron Zemo was in “Thunderbolts Presents: Zemo: Born Better” #3 with Adolf Hitler
Adolf Hitler was in “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” with Indiana Jones”

Isn’t that against your own rules, though? To wit:

“real people (by the way, unless a fake name is used for a real person, like Ronald Raygun or whatever, you can use the person even if they are not officially named in the comic) are unique to their own comic book appearances (so DC’s Thor is different than Marvel’s Thor, DC’s Ronald Reagan is different from Marvel’s Ronald Reagan, etc.).”

I mean, *technically* both these Hitlers were in Marvel comics, but only in the way that Hellboy and X-Wing Rogue Squadron are both Dark Horse comics.

Niels: That was initially what I assumed as well, but the question of whether a historical figure in a Marvel universe comic counts as the same as a historical figure in a Marvel licensed comic was specifically asked and answered by Brian in the comments last week, when this particular challenge was posed.

Buttler: That’s… I’m sorry, but I’m going to have to officially declare that utterly lame. “These are the rules, but occasionally we’ll be going directly against the rules and you’ll just have to ask about exceptions at exactly the right time to hear about them”?

Well, it wasn’t posed as an exception so much as a clarification. That is, does “DC’s Ronald Reagan is different from Marvel’s Ronald Reagan” mean that all Marvel Ronald Reagans are the same Ronald Reagan, or that Captain America’s Ronald Reagan is a different guy from, say, G.I. Joe Ronald Reagan? His call was that a historical figure is the same in a licensed comic and the regular Marvel universe. As I say, that wouldn’t have been my assumption, but it’s his call to make.

And yeah, that would have meant that if Teddy Roosevelt had shown up in Hellboy, it would have been the same Teddy Roosevelt from the Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, which is pretty counterintuitive.

I don’t know–I can see where the confusion lies, given that my own assumption was that Indiana Jones was a “separate universe” even though it was under the same publisher at the time. I’d personally want to see a clearer connection than that.

With your Reagan example, I think you WOULD have an argument that it’s all the same universe, as Marvel’s G.I.Joe crossed over with Marvel’s Transformers, the latter of which was apparently set in the Marvel U (Spider-Man, Nick Fury, and the Savage Land all made appearances in the Transformers comic, so they’d all arguably have the same Reagan).

I would like to know what effect this has on the Amalgam Comics, as Bill Clinton showed up in LEGENDS OF THE DARK CLAW #1–to my knowledge, the only real-world individual to show up in an Amalgam story. I think DC published LOTDK, so would Clinton be a mutual link between DC and Marvel, or DC and Amalgam only…? (There’s probably enough Marvel-DC links through JLA/Avengers alone, but I’m genuinely curious where this would lie.)

I thought for sure we’d have to use the Magnus Robot Fighter/Predator crossover, but I didn’t get anywhere with it.

I was thinking that there should be a route using “Sergio Aragones stomps Star Wars” (oddly enough, I can’t think of any reason why that would be excluded)- as Sergio draws himself in it it must be an authorised appearance for him and link to Sergio’s other comic appearances (Jon Sable, Sergio Aragones destroys DC, etc)

That’s a great point, John. I can’t see any reason why that would be off the table either.

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