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Month of Avengers/X-Men Top Fives – Top Five Most Heroic X-Men Deaths

All month-long we’ll be featuring top five lists about either the Avengers or the X-Men. Here is an archive of all the past top five lists!

In this installment, , we take a look at the top five most heroic X-Men deaths…

Enjoy!

NOTE: The Siege Perilous does not kill you. In Uncanny X-Men #229, it was used specifically as an ALTERNATIVE to death. Uncanny X-Men #247 then opens with a reminder about the Siege Perilous’ properties, so when Rogue plunges into it with the Master Mold at the end of the issue, there isn’t any reason for her to think that it will kill her. In fact, the Siege Perilous was her only shot of LIVING, as the Master Mold had her wrapped up and was in the process of killing her. So I don’t think it qualifies for this list. It’s a great moment, though!

HONORABLE MENTION

In Uncanny X-Men #390 by Scott Lobdell, Salvador Larroca and a bunch of inkers, Beast discovers a cure for the mutant-killing Legacy Virus (which had taken the life of Colossus’ younger sister), but also learns that for the cure to work, some mutant would have to use their mutant power and activate the cure. The downside is that in doing so, the mutant in question would die. Naturally, Beast puts the cure aside for the time being. Colossus, though, has other plans…

When Dr. Reyes recovers, she tries to save him…

While heroic, there are a couple of things that make me a bit wary of overpraising Colossus’ actions here.

1. Beast clearly says that he’s going to keep working on it. It’s not like he was just going to give up. He made such great strides, who is to say that he wouldn’t have solved the problem soon?

2. Colossus had seemingly been going through a bit of a bout of depression, so this almost seems like a fulfillment of a death wish.

But it WAS a nicely presented moment by Lobdell.

While you could ARGUE that Colossus’ death was not really a noble one, Thunderbird’s death in X-Men #95 (by Chris Claremont, Dave Cockrum, Sam Grainger and Len Wein) definitely wasn’t noble. That really was just a dude with a death wish…

When the other hero you’re with specifically explains to you that he could stop the bad guy if you would just get off of the plane and you decide you’d rather kill yourself and the bad guy, that’s not noble. It’s a good scene and I have no problem with it happening (to show that these All-New, All-Different X-Men were different from most teams – they could really be killed off), but it wasn’t a heroic death.

In X-Force #26, Nightcrawler and Rogue were trying to protect Hope from the evil Bastion when Bastion showed up and cornered the trio. He blasted Kurt and hurt him a lot…

Then, after Bastion also dealt with Rogue and was about to kill Hope, Kurt decided to sacrifice himself for Hope…

It’s a fine scene by Craig Kyle, Chris Yost and Mike Choi, but I don’t think better than the top five that follows…

5. Cyclops Merges With Apocalypse

In X-Men #97 by Alan Davis, Mark Farmer and Terry Kavanagh, a dying Apocalypse is about to succeed in taking control of X-Man’s body. The X-Men show up to stop him…

Cyclops effectively sacrifices himself, then, to save X-Man…

xmenheroicdeath5e

It is #5 because you could argue Cyclops didn’t know for SURE that he’d die. But he had to know it was a very strong possibility.

4. Professor Xavier Saves Magneto’s Life

In X-Men #41, Charles Xavier’s mentally unbalanced (but very powerful) son Legion has gone back in time to help his father out by killing Magneto before “Magneto” even existed, back when he was just Charles Xavier’s pal, Erik. A group of X-Men are sent back in time to stop him.

He attacks Magneto and explains his plan…

And after repelling an attempt by the X-Men to stop him, he gets down to business…

I think Nicieza really nailed the nobility of Xavier’s sacrifice.

The art was by Andy Kubert and Matt Ryan (Kubert doing just layouts, which is why the pages look a bit different).

3. The X-Men Save the World at the Cost of Their Lives

In Uncanny X-Men #227 by Chris Claremont, Marc Silvestri and Dan Green, the Adversary seemingly cannot be stopped, except for a special magic spell, with quite a high cost…

Not that I don’t think that Maddie Pryor was a more appropriate choice for the ninth sacrifice than Neal Conan, it is kind of funny that it is just a foregone conclusion that Conan should be spared and Pryor shouldn’t.

2. Jean Grey Saves Her Teammates

In X-Men #100 by Chris Claremont and Dave Cockrum, Jean Grey saves all of her teammates with a noble sacrifice…

How awesomely executed were those sound effects? WOW!

1. The Phoenix Sacrifices Herself/Itself

In X-Men #137 by Chris Claremont, John Byrne and Terry Austin, “Jean Grey” sacrifices herself to prevent herself from turning back into Dark Phoenix…

If you follow the retcon that she is NOT Jean Grey here, the sacrifice seems even more noble, as Jean Grey’s personality is so noble that a cosmic being who was just PRETENDING to be her still sacrificed herself for the better good. For a human to do that is impressive, for a cosmic being to do that because they’ve been imprinted with a human soul is even more impressive.

That’s the list! Agree? Disagree? Let us know!

59 Comments

I’m glad that in a serious, somber moment like the death of colossus, the creators still found the time to have a butt shot in cutoff shorts from a suggestive angle. Every death scene needs cheesecake to give if depth.

I dunno, I think the point of the issue was that everyone was just hanging out, relaxing when suddenly Colossus makes this bold decision. Note that Gambit is also shirtless (they were just playing basketball. Wolverine, oddly enough, was in his uniform).

Jeez, Colossus didn’t have to commit suicide. He could have just cut the ponytail OFF!

Cyclops’s death in Astonishing was pretty good too. Sure, he THOUGHT Ord could resurrect him, but “I’m going to die so I can become a prisoner and take down the villain from within from inside” is still a pretty crazy-ass plan.

That was a great quote. I hadn’t realized Lodbell had done that (its been so long since I read that issue.) I personally think Lodbell should be on call to write any issues where an x-character dies.

Nightcrawler’s death should be on this list. He sacrificed himself to save all of mutantkind. And unlike most of the deaths on this list, it hasn’t been retconned away. Indeed, the leaks about Amazing X-men seem to suggest that he’ll be brought back in a way that changes nothing about the nature of his original death or our understanding of it. It looks like he’ll just be rescued from Hell.

Good call giving Jean/Phoenix the 1 and 2 slot.

But Thunderbird should be on there, just for being a death that actually “stuck”.

@Greg P

Nightcrawler’s death was quite similar to Banshee’s, a sudden death in a battle rather than a specific choice made for noble reasons (I know he was died saving Hope, but I can’t recall if it was a sacrifice or just bad luck). Not saying your opinion is invalid, but I think that was what Brian was focusing on.

Oh, and I love that a character being rescued for hell counts as “not being retconned away”. Sincerely, I do. Comics are awesome

That scene is kind of ambiguous, but I’ve always read it as Nightcrawler teleporting between Bastion and Hope to stop him from killing her, not Nightcrawler trying to teleport her away and then getting impaled by accident.

yeah, there’s dr corbeau. i guess jean grey needed his pilot knowledge so she could ‘absorb’ it and fly the shuttle back to earth but i dunno, i always thot of him as completely useless.

If a slingshot could’ve stopped Apocalypse at that moment, why didn’t Cyclops just take off his visor and huck it at the bastard?

Oh, and I love that a character being rescued for hell counts as “not being retconned away”. Sincerely, I do. Comics are awesome

I think what you’re trying to say is that comics are such an endearingly wacky and kooky that they’re the only genre/medium where such a thing would not be considered a retcon. But you’re wrong. It wouldn’t be a retcon in any media or genre, whether TV, a novel, a film, or a play. A retcon is short for retroactive continuity, and it means that someone is rewriting established history of what happened at a certain point in time. That’s very different than just having a new development happen later on that undoes the effect of an old development.

For example, Norman Osborn originally died after killing Gwen Stacy. His body was buried and he had a funeral. Decades later a comic was published revealing that the previously established death and burial never happened, that Norman had a never before revealed healing factor, and behind the scenes Norman resurrected, escaped the morgue, killed a homeless man, and used that homeless man’s body to replace his own in the morgue, and that was the body that was actually buried in Norman’s place. That’s a retcon. It retroactively changes established continuity of the past. Compare that to the death and return of Hawkeye. He was killed during a battle with Scarlet Witch. Later on the Scarlet Witch resurrected him. That wasn’t a retcon because no past continuity was retroactively changed in bringing him back. The death as we knew it still stood.

So back to the Nightcrawler example, if he is revealed to have died, like we thought, but his soul turns out to be in hell and has to be rescued, this is not a retcon, because no continuity is retroactively being changed. His death as we know it still happened. If Nightcrawler is instead revealed to have faked his death using a life model decoy because he was being mind controlled by a villain who needed to use his real body for a special ritual, that would be a retcon because it would change the past continuity that was already established. His death as we know it actually never happened.

I dunno, I think the point of the issue was that everyone was just hanging out, relaxing when suddenly Colossus makes this bold decision. Note that Gambit is also shirtless (they were just playing basketball. Wolverine, oddly enough, was in his uniform)

It wasn’t so much the outfit as it was the odd angle chosen in that specific panel. It seemed to be going out of its way to choose an unnatural angle that would maximize her buttcheek exposure. Not a big deal, but kind of sucked me out of the moment because it seemed to be calling attention to itself.

For my money, Rogue’s sacrifice in UXM# 247 is top shelf. Not only is it a nicely constructed end to the story arc, it is a wonderful culmination to her character development from the start in Avengers Annual #10.

One could make the argument that because she didn’t actually die and the Siege Perilous itself wasn’t guaranteed to be lethal, that it shouldn’t count, but all indications were that going through the Siege Perilous was, at best, a murky bet whether or not that person would survive.

Claremont was so spotty with his writing during that era, but he knocked those two issues (#246-247) out of the park.

The first death that affected me was Thunderbird in X-Men 95. I thought it should at least merit an honourable mention.

That Colossus death was so awkward. They were really desperate to end that Legacy Virus arc. Whedon was right to bring him back.

If Apocalypse could be stopped by a bullet at that moment, why didn’t Cyclops just tell Cable to shoot him? Or have Storm hit him with a lightning bolt?

If a slingshot could’ve stopped Apocalypse at that moment, why didn’t Cyclops just take off his visor and huck it at the bastard?

A slingshot can pretty reliably kill a dude. I don’t think that a chucked visor would.

If Apocalypse could be stopped by a bullet at that moment, why didn’t Cyclops just tell Cable to shoot him? Or have Storm hit him with a lightning bolt?

Cyclops and Jean were the only ones near him at the time. There was only moments before he possessed X-Man’s body, which would have been terrible news for all involved.

Screw the retcon. Jean was dead as of Uncanny X-Men #137 and remains the gold standard for self-sacrifices. Nothing that followed from Kurt Busiek’s suggestion of how she could be brought back, to Byrne’s issue of FF where she did, to her entire run on X-Factor and later the X-Men proper, right up to the point where Morrison dispatched her again, NONE of it equals the impact that Jean’s original demise had on comics.

Nowadays the Phoenix Force has been whored around more times than every shoehorned Punisher or Wolverine guest appearance of the past 25 years. But it still can’t dilute this original, epic finale from 1980.

Colossus’ death felt more like a needless suicide if you consider his final words. I never thought Peter would be written off like that but this was during Joe Quesada’s “dead means dead” period and seeing Kitty holding Peter’s ashes the following issue really hammered the point home for me. (And yeah, the Reyes butt shot distracted me as well.) Regardless, I’ll always be grateful to Whedon for bringing back our favorite Russian mutant. The only thing that deserved to die in #390 was Peter’s horrible costume.

Kinda eerie how Banshee ended up dying in an aircraft-related tragedy just as Thunderbird did decades earlier. The problem with T-Bird was that he awfully sounded like the new team’s resident bad boy/rebel hothead far more than Wolverine did at first, and there would only be enough room for one Logan in the series.

It is just me or is Legion an extremely annoying character with no redeeming qualities whatsoever? I mean, that hair of his alone… Geez! And Professor X has died so many times now (include Secret Wars in that list ) that it’s become a joke. He’s the Anti-Uncle Ben. Expect him back along with Kurt by the time the next movie hits theaters.

I think that because of Scott’s psychic rapport with Jean, her deaths in #1 and 2 above damaged him. He did some pretty bad things after that ( such as quickly marrying and the abandoning Madelyne Pryor). Then he had his own near death as shown in #5 above and simply never recovered. That is why he is such a dick now.

IIRC, Claremont or Wein said killing Thunderbird was because his power-set wasn’t distinctive and killing someone off would hopefully grab attention for the book.
Clutch, I agree. I have the same feeling about Warlock’s original death and Dracula’s death at the end of TOD: there was never anything done with them later that made it worth undoing such effective moments.
God, I’d forgotten what a pompous windbag Apocalypse was.

I’m glad you didn’t include Thunderbird in the top five. I argued to a friend that T-Bird basically committed suicide. The friend disagreed because, I guess, heroes can only die nobly, not ignobly. Or something. But I don’t know how you read T-Bird’s actions as anything but a voluntary choice to die.

If the list were “important deaths” or “dramatic deaths,” that might be different. But T-Bird doesn’t belong on a list of noble deaths.

I guess it doesn’t count, because she wasn’t an X-man (but she was working with them at the time), but Destiny’s death scene in Uncanny X-men #255 is awesome and deserves some recognition.

Maybe as a cool comic book moment!

What about Caliban in Messiah Complex, you gotta love Cyclops telling his team to grab his body, “he died an x-men”

Geez! And Professor X has died so many times now (include Secret Wars in that list ) that it’s become a joke. He’s the Anti-Uncle Ben. Expect him back along with Kurt by the time the next movie hits theaters.

I think Brian should do a follow up list to this: top 5 X-deaths, but this time referring to quantity of deaths rather than quality. I’m curious to see which X-Men died the most. I bet Jean Grey, for all the death jokes she gets, would even crack the top 3.

Jean Grey would dominate. If we just went by on-panel deaths, she died about 12 times in Phoenix Endsong (plus a bunch more implied deaths).

I never read Endsong so I had no idea. I’d still love to see the list regardless.

Also, I’d like to see the math on longest-lasting deaths. I’m pretty sure Bucky is probably #1 on that list, and then maybe Norman Osborn? But I’d be curious to see the list of longest-lasting X deaths.

“It is just me or is Legion an extremely annoying character with no redeeming qualities whatsoever? I mean, that hair of his alone… Geez!”

I doubt you’ll want to read it given your views on Legion, But Si Spurrier is really doing some delightfully creative stuff with Legion in X-Men: Legacy right now. And Mike del Mundo on the covers is working wonders with the hair style in particular. Spurroer doesn;t go in for hand-holding exposition, and it can be a dense read at times, but it’s highly recommended.

Death was really what made the ALL-NEW, ALL-DIFFERENT X-MEN … well … different. However, as the series grew more popular and the X-titles proliferated, it has really become a liability.

Captain Marvel’s got to be up there as he’s never been resurrected and it’s what, 30 years? And Manhunter died in the early seventies and never came back (though they’ve used his clones a couple of time).

If we extend it to the X-spinoffs, Cypher’s death warrants mention. He sacrificed himself for Wolfsbane, iirc. Unfortunately, it was during the long, dark night of post-Claremont New Mutants and could have been done much better.

@sean,

I don’t know if the character ever came back, but Changeling was revealed to have died impersonating Prof. X in an issue from the late ’60s (the last Neal Adams issue, I forget the number). If he hasn’t been resurrected, I belive he’s the X-character hat’s stayed dead the longest.

Jean definitely would dominate a list of the x-character with the most deaths…especially if you factor in various (and sometimes prominent) out of continuity stories where she dies. But the reason her deaths and returns have become such a joke is because of how prominent they have been and that her constant returns have become plot points to the point where the X-Men themselves even joke about it.

I had forgotten Cyclops’ “death” from “The Twelve” storyline. It was a pretty well written moment in an otherwise awful storyline. I especially like how it mirrors Jean’s death in Uncanny 137 (rightfully #1 on the list). I remember being really disappointed in “The Twelve” because I had really enjoyed the long build up to it with references dating back over a decade before and the work Joe Casey did in his Cable run. It could have been a great story but just totally went off the rails.

One thing that strikes me as funny is there isn’t a single one on your list (not counting Thunderbird who NOBODY missed) that actually stuck (now that Nightcrawler is coming back)…a few of them were never even MEANT to last as they were almost immediately reversed (at least a couple within the same plotline).

And anyone want to take bets on how long it takes them to bring back Xavier from his most recent death? Personally, I think he’s a character that needed to die and stay dead years ago but, setting aside the nature of death in comics, there’s no way they would ever let that one stand given how it played out.

Woah! Thunderbird! Best death ever!!!

He even stayed dead. R.I.P!

My favorite look is Legion’s face after he accidently kills his own dad. Classic!

What about Kitty Pryde in Astonishing X-Men?! She sacrificed herself to save the entire planet from a massive bullet for Christ’s sake!

I just can’t get over Nightcrawler teleporting INTO an arm. I mean c’mon, there had to be a huge number of other ways to resolve that one.

I’m going to defend Thunderbird’s death as a noble death, seeing as how back then they didn’t resurrect characters, so in his mind, he was really risking his life.

Conversely, every X-Man post-X-Factor who sacrifices themselves have got to be calculating, “I’ll probably get written back into the series inside 2 or 3 years…”

Xavier needs to stay dead. There’s nothing he can accomplish as a character by coming back to life that can surpass what he accomplishes by staying dead. Plus, not only was he killed, his body was dismembered and Red Skull is using his brain to give himself telepathic powers. There’s no way to retcon that.

dhole, dude, he was told repeatedly that he didn’t have to die. Any number of X-Men, including Banshee, who was there, could have disabled Nefaria’s jet. That he didn’t do so, and died, was simply the result of a stubborn fool who wouldn’t listen.

Greg P.: Considering how silly “comic book death” has become at this point, I bet it’s on purpose, too. The writers are like “Okay, body ripped apart. Supervillain using his brain to get powers. What’s next? Uhhh… Pieces of his body dug up and disintegrated. We can write that in… he’d still have a soul, though. We can have someone go to the afterlife and kill his soul… somehow. Dammit, they are NOT BRINGING THIS ONE BACK!”

Only to prove fruitless in a few years when someone writes a story where the Scarlet Witch wishes him back to life or something.

There are two easy ways to bring Xavier back. One is through the time-displaced original X-Men. They keep saying that as soon as they return to their own time, Xavier will wipe their memories, but who is to say that he doesn’t use some of that knowledge to make changes of his own? The other is that at the moment before death he became a psychic entity like the Shadow King and is “living” in the astral plane.

“For such as we….anything is possible.” ;-)

Well…Charlie can return as a clone. Remember that the body he was using was not his own. The original one was destroyed when a Brood embryo hatched back in the Paul Smith era. So basically the Xavier we have been reading this past decades is a clone with a mind transfer.

I’d love it if Xavier’s brain eventually just takes over the Red Skull’s body.

“Well, the good news is that I’m alive again, and I can walk, which I always like. The downside is that I might want to start wearing a mask, just, like, literally 100 percent of the time.”

The problem with Kurt is that he easily could teleport with Hope: his training as an acrobat and in the danger room could permit it: his death was stupidly done!
And Xavier had the ‘Xavier Protocols’ to stop every X-Man in every situation!. He even pushed the real Phoenix back in the Phoenix Saga and Cyclops had only 1/5 of the Phoenix Power. That’s why I’m not a fan of the current X-Men.They fight more between them and Avengers than against their adversaries! At least those which are not in their teams!

Whenever I read that Colossus death scene, I wonder again what I wondered then – why didn’t they just call up Mr. Immortal, a mutant whose power is coming back from death, give him the cure, kill him to activate his power and release the cure, and then he comes back to life?

Badda-bing, badda-boom. Problem solved. Nobody dead.

Cyclops had the whole Phoenix at the time. When Namor, Colossus, and Magik lost their Phoenix, it went into the remaining Phoenicians. It didn’t dissipate into the ether. Then Cyclops explicitly stole the Phoenix from Emma.

Whenever I read that Colossus death scene, I wonder again what I wondered then – why didn’t they just call up Mr. Immortal, a mutant whose power is coming back from death, give him the cure, kill him to activate his power and release the cure, and then he comes back to life?

Badda-bing, badda-boom. Problem solved. Nobody dead.

I don’t buy that it would be a no-brainer that Mr. Immortal would survive. If coming back from the dead was his mutant power, then the activation of his mutant power would BE the return to life, right? So the virus could then still kill him by messing up his mutant powers.

I think the only thing that could compel me to ever read another book with Legion in it is if it were called Legion Loves Crazy Jane.

i would have been surprised to not see jeans death during the dark phoenix saga make the cut given she did it to keep her friends and the universe safe from the phoenix forces wrath even though its worn off with her being brought back and killed over and over. colluses death was kind of noble for he got the legacy virus cured. the x-mens death by forge were interesting but kind of a let down since they later got it undone and made undetactable by machines.

I think it was a bad idea to kill Colossus, but given that they did it, I’d like to defend it as a “noble” death.

One of the arguments against it being noble is that, as Brian pointed out, Beast was still working on the problem, and might have come up with something soon. Now, I wasn’t reading X-men at the time, so this might be a false premise, but it was my understanding that the Legacy Virus was killing a lot of mutants worldwide when this was going on. I don’t know if they suggested what the scale of the death toll was: 10 mutant deaths a day? 100? 1000?

Regardless, even on the low end of the scale, even if it had only taken Beast another 24 hours to come up with a full cure, that’s (10/100/1,000) innocent people dead, that might have been saved if the cure had been dispersed sooner. And what if it had taken him a few days? Or a week? Or a month? Even a month is a really short period of time to engineer a cure for a novel strain of virus as these things go, and yet the death toll would be mounting each day, and possibly each hour, that they delayed.

Even if only ONE person were saved by Colossus dispersing the cure right then, rather than a day/week/month later, well… that’s pretty noble. That’s what heroes do, lay down their life to save one or more innocents.

When I first read this, and given the line of reasoning I just explained, I couldn’t understand why all the other X-men weren’t agreeing with Colossus, and fighting amongst themselves to be the one to take one for the team themselves instead of opposing that course of action. Possibly because the line of reasoning I laid out wasn’t even mentioned as a motivating factor by the writers… I blame an oversight in the storytelling process for that.

As to Brian’s second point, sure, Colossus probably was depressed enough to have a pseudo-death wish, but that still doesn’t make it an ignoble act, or even make Colossus the wrong one to do the deed. He’d just lost a close family member. If he felt he could prevent even one person from dying, and prevent that person’s family from feeling the pain he was feeling at the time, then it was worth it. That’s noble, and empathetic, not selfish.

My two cents anyway.

‘Xavier needs to stay dead. There’s nothing he can accomplish as a character by coming back to life that can surpass what he accomplishes by staying dead.’

That depends of the editor and of the storytellers! Look at Hulk. Before Peter David, he bored me, until the Smart Green Hulk and the Pantheon. How many times Xavier was more seen as the Dark Xavier, more close to Magneto rather than as a Martin Luther King Xavier? Take Jean Grey before Chris Claremont and the Phoenix? Steve Rogers before Steve Englehart or Ed Brubaker? Or Batman by Denny o’Neil and Neal Adams after the TV camp Batman…. Better interpretations of characters can always be found…while erasing what definitively was bad.

I would normally say Xavier should absolutely stay dead. I have always thought he needed to die because the X-Men can’t really shine as long as they can run back to Daddy everytime they get in any real trouble. But the way he died will never be allowed to stand. He didn’t get a true noble sacrifice death and they’ll have to redeem Cyclops at some point. Dark Phoenix killed billions but they were faceless aliens no one cares about, not the founder of the X-Men.

As for there being no way to retcon Xavier’s death, what comics are you reading? There are any number of ways to bring him back. They could always ignore the Uncanny Avengers follow up and go with the ever-popular “he never actually died” approach. Time travel, clones, altered reality, magic, or maybe he’ll pull a Harry Osborn and “forget” he died. Or they could have an actual ressurection. The possibilities are endless and, at some point, we’ll see one of them in print…or a combination of several. Hell, if Battle of the Atom rewrites X-Men history, he might be back in a couple issues.

That the same character occupies two places on list of best deaths say a lot about this crazy medium we love :)

There’s a difference between bringing someone back and retconning the death. Jean Grey is back, but her most recent death basically still stands, because the means of her return was time travel.

But my broader point is that even if a return is possible to write, there’s no good reason to write one. In a universe of very limited real change, especially generational change, mutantkind has definitively moved past the Xavier vs Magneto era to the Cyclops vs. Wolverine era. Bringing Xavier back for any reason would always be retarding the progress of the franchise.

They almost always eventually revert to the classic status quo…for better or worse. I have little doubt they will eventually have Xavier back and in charge of the school with everyone (including Cyclops and Wolverine) working for him again. I don’t want to go back to that…but I don’t want Cyclops to stand as Xavier’s murderer either and I doubt that will be allowed to last. And this whole bit with Wolverine leading the larger x-men faction just seems lame to me and will never make any sense. He’s only in charge because he’s popular and already had a built-in rivalry with Cyclops.

What reprint is that color job for #100 from?

Cyclops and Jean were the only ones near him at the time. There was only moments before he possessed X-Man’s body, which would have been terrible news for all involved.

Well, Jean could basically turn any piece of debris laying around into a bullet.

“Well, the good news is that I’m alive again, and I can walk, which I always like. The downside is that I might want to start wearing a mask, just, like, literally 100 percent of the time.”

“But damn it I still don’t have hair!!”

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