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Best of 2013 – We Can Fix It!

We Can Fix It coverAs I mentioned during my Top 10 Comics of 2013, instead of just listing a bunch of honorable mentions for the list, I’m instead going to spotlight some other 2013 comics that I liked a lot in their own individual posts. First up, we have Jess Fink’s hilariously charming time travel graphic novel from Top Shelf Productions, We Can Fix It! The sub-title of the comic gives you the best idea of what it is about – “A Time Travel Memoir.” This story uses time travel as a way for Fink (and the reader) to re-examine Fink’s past and through these trips to the past, see her present in a new light. It’s a really delightful work that mixes over-the-top humor with some deep insights into Fink’s personality and both the vagaries of the human memory and the value that the mistakes in our lives have in making us who we are.

This comic gets into the thick of things with a bang right out of the gate. To give you a hint of what kind of approach Fink is taking with this story, check out the first five pages…

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Twistedly hilarious, right?

Future Jess then decides to make past Jess’ sexual exploits better. She then figures – why stop there? She continues to try to correct the problems of her past (through traveling to the past, and thereby giving us a deep and full view of her life) but a funny thing happens along the way.

1. Just like the sexy times weren’t quite as sexy as she remembers, nor were the bad times quite as bad as she remembered.

2. Secondly, if your experience during your life make you the person that you are, then should we ever really “correct” our past mistakes?

Fink examines these intruiging ideas with a fast-paced, hilarious way in a fashion that manages to both be down-to-Earth AND out-of-this world.

Fink is an outstanding cartoonist. I can’t wait until her next comic book work!

6 Comments

Thanks for the recommendation! This looks like a great book. I love the humor of it but I can see that there’s probably a whole other layer to the story.

I saw Fink at SPX this year and she was cosplaying her time-travel self. Only I didn’t realize it until now (as I’ve yet to read the book). I just thought she wanted to be future-y and rad.

Thanks for the preview, having only seen the cover, I was a bit on the fence—but this looks like a lot of fun.

I got this through Top Shelf’s sale (along with her previous Chester 5000, which I didn’t even open up yet), and I started flipping through the beginning to take a look (but was being OCD and didn’t want to READ it quite yet), and after this hilarious opening, I kept flipping and flipping. Finally got about 50 pages in before I said, no, I need to stop.

Yeah, I don’t know why either. Damn OCD! What I did read was hilarious and fun cartooning. Nice choice.

I got Chester 5000 in an older Top Shelf sale. I thought it was just going to be a cute Victorian robot romance. I regret reading it in Starbucks.

It says it’s erotic right on the cover, Seth!

I. What? Oh wow, you’re right. Which just goes to show how much I pay attention to non-title text on a book’s cover.

I actually had similar trouble with the first Manara collection. I thought I was getting a cool historical frontier romance. The promotional blurbs were promising: Milo Manara, Italian Comics Legend; comprehensive collection; seminal works; sweeping epic; first comprehensive North American hardcover collection of Manara’s work! Not bad. And a quote from Frank Miller: “In the hand of Milo Manara, the Old West is a generous, delicious feast for the eyes.”

I was unfamiliar with Manara and didn’t see the small shelving advice on the book’s rear cover: “Historical Fiction | Erotica.”

That was another one I read in public, not realizing what I was getting into until like page 3 where there’s a sexy rape.

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