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Month of African-American Comics – The Trouble With Love

All this month I’ll be reviewing different comic books by African-American creators, based on submissions from the actual creators of the comic books themselves. A quick note – since this month is so relatively short, I’ll be featuring an extra comic every week, for a total of 32 comics spotlighted! Here is a list of all the comics spotlighted so far!

Today we take a look at Victor Dandridge’s graphic novel, The Trouble With Love, drawn by Harold Edge and Ryan Carter.

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This graphic novel is absolutely fascinating, in the sense that so rarely do you get a well-rounded look at infidelity in fiction PERIOD, but in a SUPERHERO comic? Victor Dandridge has a very ambitious story in mind here and I think he pulls it off nicely.

The concept of the comic is that a young man confronts his father over his father leaving the boy’s mother and re-marrying. Normal enough conflict in the world, only in this instance, the father also happens to be essentially Superman. And the boy has some futuristic ray gun trained on his father.

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First off, what an awesome flashback sequence by Edge and Carter, right? They totally got across that it was a flashback without explicitly stating “this is a flashback,” all through some quality storytelling and some good use of colors.

Dandridge’s story is an emotional tale, as the Superman-esque hero struggles with his attraction for “the other woman,” but eventually gives into his feelings. And here is where Dandridge uses the superhero trope in a really clever way. Superheroes are already used to living double lives, right? So wouldn’t it be so much easier for a superhero to add a THIRD life in there? On the other side of the coin, the paparazzi can’t really get at a superhero when he is just by himself with his family in the suburbs, but when he is sneaking around with a woman in the city, there’s a better chance of being caught – and if they DO get caught, how can anyone know that the “other woman” isn’t the ONLY woman?

It’s a complicated tale with a powerful ending filled with strong artwork from Edge and Carter. It’s a story well-worth picking up.

You can buy it a lot of different places. Here it is at Amazon.

3 Comments

It does, rather.

I’m impressed. I’m trying this.

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