web stats

CSBG Archive

Abandoned Love: Isn’t Cyclops’ Dad Dead?

Every installment of Abandoned Love we will be examining comic book stories, plots and ideas that were abandoned by a later writer while still acknowledging that the abandoned story DID still happen. Click here for an archive of all the previous editions of Abandoned Love. Feel free to e-mail me at bcronin@comicbookresources.com if you have any suggestions for future editions of this feature.

This time around, we look at the revelation this week of why is it that Corsair of the Strajammers (Cyclops and Havok’s father) is no longer dead…

In Uncanny X-Men #486, the conclusion to The Rise and Fall of the Shi’ar Empire by Ed Brubaker, Billy Tan and Danny Miki, Corsair’s crazy third son, Vulcan, (who Corsair never knew was born, since he was just a fetus when Corsair’s wife was kidnapped and then killed by Shi’ar – the Shi’ar then took the fetus and continued gestating him in a special birthing device to use as slave labor) just took over the Shi’ar Empire by killing the mad Emperor who he helped take over the throne from Lilandra (she was the good Empress of the Shi’ar Empire, who helped turn them around from the jerks who killed Corsair’s wife). Now it seemed to be Lilandra’s turn…

corsairdead1

corsairdead2

corsairdead3

corsairdead4

So that was that for a number of years.

Recently, however, five of the original X-Men (Cyclops, Marvel Girl, Angel, Beast and Iceman) traveled from the past and then have been stuck in the present ever since. Corsair showed up and decided to take this younger Cyclops under his wing, hoping to be a father for this young Cyclops that he never got a chance to be for the older Cyclops.

That left the question of how, exactly, Corsair was ALIVE to take young Scott Summers under his wing.

In last week’s Cyclops #3, Greg Rucka and Russell Dauterman revealed the answer…

corsairdead5

They also revealed that Corsair didn’t reveal himself being alive to Havok or Cyclops because he immediately began killing Shi’ar out of revenge for what happened to him and his wife and child, so he was so caught up in anger and revenge that he didn’t want his living sons to see him like that – but when he learned what had happened on Earth (that Cyclops was now seen as a villain and that there was a teenage version of Scott) he decided he needed to get involved.

The problem in the issue is that, as noted in the page above, Corsair now needs a special medicine to REMAIN alive, and they are currently in a situation where he doesn’t have access to it and likely WON’T have access to it in the foreseeable future. Want to see how that turns out? Pick up Cyclops #3 and #4 when it comes out next month! It is a fun comic book (and Dauterman – wow, it is no surprise that he’s already been tapped for a larger profile comic book, the new female Thor series – he’s great).

That’s it for this installment! If YOU have a suggestion for an abandoned story, drop me a line at bcronin@comicbookresources.com

35 Comments

One of my favorite series right now. And yeah – Russel Dauterman is absolutely killing it. Gorgeous stuff.

Agreed. It’s a shame that the series is already losing its writer AND its artist, though.

Didn’t Hepzibah come back to Earth after his death though? I’m fairly sure she was in the remainder of Brubaker’s run, and she had a relationship with Warpath…

Marvel’s talent management seems to work OK for writers, who can mostly crank out the issues, but not so well for artists, who in many cases only seem to manage one story arc–or less–before being moved off to a different assignment.

That’s fine if it’s what the artists prefer, but the timing makes me doubt it. Artists like Dauterman, Mahmud Asrar, Ed McGuinness, Kev Walker, etc., get pulled off “their” books mid-storyline when a higher-profile Avengers or X-Men book needs good art fast.

An interesting case to look at might be GotG (Bendis does seem to have a lot of sway to pull artists onto his books). How many new “regular” artists has that book had–moslty pulled from other ongoing series. Pichelli, Bradshaw, McGuinness have come and gone. I’m not counting Francavilla, who I think was only ever a guest artist, and McNiven, the launch artist, who no one could really expect to stick around too long.

This kind of thing does make it a lot harder to get excited about jumping on a regular series. “This intricate new 60-issue mega-epic will be drawn by Jerome Opena, Mike Deodato, and Greg Land!!!” (Not an actual series.)

Fortunately there are a few relatively stable examples, like Samnee (and Rodriguez!) on Daredevil, and, God willing, Alphona on Ms. Marvel and Pulido on She-Hulk.

I haven’t been around this stuff for a while; but one thing that always kind of bugged me about X-Men and the Shi’ar was that Dave Cockrum’s design aesthetics weren’t carried through by other artists. It’s a minor thing, to be sure, but Cockrum made things look “otherworldly.” I like how he had Corsair’s laser pistols appear when the touched gems on his gauntlets, rather than just having them in holsters, as everyone since has done. It indicated advanced technology. Meanwhile, the insectoid ship designs were different. Now, everything looks generic “alien.” Times change and books evolve; but, you can’t beat a classic.

Cyclops is the second best X-book out there right now. Just behind Claremont’s Nightcrawler, both of which have gone a long way towards reminding me what made me love the X-Men to begin with. At their heart, both books are about outsiders trying to find their place in a world that doesn’t want them. The other X-writers need to remember that sometimes it is the simple story that is the best.

@ Jeff Nettleton Unfortunately the longer a character’s around under multiple creators, the more their unique edges are sanded down in favor of an enduring archetype. This is as true for artists as it is for writers, as evidenced by the regressed technology of the Starjammers that you ably observed.

I’m sure Dauterman is great and all but I only got on Thor for Esad Ribic (also helped that I enjoyed Jason’s stories)

Marvel’s talent management seems to work OK for writers, who can mostly crank out the issues, but not so well for artists, who in many cases only seem to manage one story arc–or less–before being moved off to a different assignment.

That’s fine if it’s what the artists prefer, but the timing makes me doubt it. Artists like Dauterman, Mahmud Asrar, Ed McGuinness, Kev Walker, etc., get pulled off “their” books mid-storyline when a higher-profile Avengers or X-Men book needs good art fast.

Marvel has always pulled artists from low-profile titles to put them on to higher profile titles. Byrne from Iron Fist to X-Men, Bagley from New Warriors to Amazing Spider-Man, Lee from Punisher War Journal to Uncanny X-Men, JRjr from Iron Man to Amazing Spider-Man, Frenz from the Lucasfilm books to Amazing Spider-Man, Romita from Daredevil to Amazing Spider-Man. It just plain ol’ makes sense, doesn’t it? Your best artists should be on your highest profile titles.

Didn’t Hepzibah come back to Earth after his death though? I’m fairly sure she was in the remainder of Brubaker’s run, and she had a relationship with Warpath…

Rucka doesn’t note WHEN Hepzibah did what she did. Remember, she was stuck on Earth. She didn’t go there voluntarily. So I imagine that as soon as she found a way off planet, that’s when she went out and brought Corsair back to life.

Question: is Russel Dautherman the first gay artist on a Thor book? Sorry for going off topic…

Question: is Russel Dautherman the first gay artist on a Thor book? Sorry for going off topic…

Regular artist? I believe so. Other gay artists have drawn issues in the past, though (Phil Jimenez and P. Craig Russell to name two).

Huh, I’d never heard before that PCR is gay. That’s cool. I don’t know what Thor issues he drew, though.

Thanks. His art on this is amazing! Even though i like brubaker i thought Corsair’s death was kinda cheap…

Thanks Brian for choosing this topic. I was a bit confused about Corsair’s resurrection and wondered if / when it would finally be addressed. I too have wondered about Hepzibah’s continuity issues. She made for an interesting X-Man and I was disappointed when she was written out of Uncanny. I guess it’s just one more loose X-thread for the bin.

I’m not reading this, so forgive me if these questions are answered in the comics. Firstly, what happened to Rachel Grey’s boyfriend Korvus, the guy with the huge blade that had a part of the phoenix in it? Last time he was seen was heading off with (and presumably leading) the Starjammers.

Secondly, have they ever addressed the fact that Hepzibah was in a relationship with Warpath?

Thirdly, any word on whether or not Corsair actually tried to find Vulcan, his long lost son that killed him? He was supposed to have been killed with Black Bolt, but since Black Bolt survived, why not Vulcan?

Fourthly, anyone else notice how incredibly creepy/jerkish it is for Corsair to only take young Cyclops with him? He’s basically saying to adult Cyclops “Sorry, but you didn’t turn out the way I wanted so I’m going to hang out with this young, cool version of you.” Not old Cyclops, not Havok, not his grandson Cable or great-granddaughter Hope, but young time traveling Cyclops. It’s like he’s going through a mid-life crisis ( albeit in a way that only a superhero could).

I definitely agree with Jeff Nettleton, especially when it comes to Hepzibah. Dave Cockrum designed her to be a humanoid skunk. She’s specifically named after the sexy French skunk Mam’selle Hepizbah from Walt Kelly’s Pogo comic strip. But most artists after Cockrum have drawn Hepzibah to look like a cat.

Seeing love for the Cyclops and Nightcrawler books surprises me. I read issue #1 of Cyclops and it was so bad that I never bought issue 2.

Nightcrawler lasted longer but the sexism got to me and I finally dropped it.

X-Men is hanging in there, but just barely. The only thing good in the X-books right now is Bendis.

Brian, I’m on moderation? :(

1. I think Korvus was shown as still being a member in Bendis’ run. Anyway, he may have gone solo again now that the original captain returned. Being Shiar, he may have reminded Corsair of he species he now hates. 2.Warpath unceremoniously dumped cold- turkey Hepzibah when he became all grim and gritty emo again when he joined Wolverine’s first version of Xforce during Kyle and Yost’s run. It was shown that in their last contact she was trying to speak to him over the phone during a long-distance call from San Francisco to Colorado ( where Xforce HQ was at Warren’s ranch ) but he was just listening to her voice and not answering back at all . This was partly to protect the then-still secrecy of Xforce and partly because he was experiencing shame at what he was doing, as he revealed to Wolverine. Later, in the SWORD series set during the Dark Reign, she was arrested and detained by Sword in a mass raid of illegal alien ET’s on Earth but was later freed from their orbital hq during a mass breakout caused by robotic supervillain UNIT. It was then that she presumably returned to space and rejoined the Starjammers. After all, what’s a widow to do when her rebound guy won’t return her calls anymore? Resurrect her dead hubby lol! 3. Why would Corsair try to find Vulcan again when it’s clear that they’ll never reconcile. And Vulcan really doesn’t have a healing factor per se or is even really invincible he just manipulates matter and energy ala Mikhail Rasputin while Black Bolt generates and channels energy and so would have to be superhumanly tough and durable to produce and contain such energies. Likely BlackBolt overloaded him and he exploded! 4. As if any of his other family members would even agree to go and spend a vacation with him in space if he asked them as they’re all already too busy with their own personal agendas on Earth.

Incidentally, do the Shiar and/or D’Ken have a particular hate for the Summers family? They put in a LOT of work growing Vulcan to adulthood if the plan was to make him a slave.

It just plain ol’ makes sense, doesn’t it? Your best artists should be on your highest profile titles.

Yes and no. Overall I agree with you, but I think sometimes your best artists can MAKE a low profile title into a high profile one. Cockrum on the X-Men and Miller on Daredevil for example. That’s a strategy that seems to happen less and less these days. Imagine how different things could have been if Miller was pulled from his DD run early into it to get put on something bigger?

Brian, much thanks for this. Because when Corsair showed up in Trial of Jean Grey I was like “the hell?”.

Marvel has always pulled artists from low-profile titles to put them on to higher profile titles. Byrne from Iron Fist to X-Men, Bagley from New Warriors to Amazing Spider-Man, Lee from Punisher War Journal to Uncanny X-Men, JRjr from Iron Man to Amazing Spider-Man, Frenz from the Lucasfilm books to Amazing Spider-Man, Romita from Daredevil to Amazing Spider-Man. It just plain ol’ makes sense, doesn’t it? Your best artists should be on your highest profile titles.

It makes perfect sense but the examples you cite are all from an era when artists had long runs in a comic. Sure, Lee was taken out from Punisher WJ but he had drawn a healthy amount of issues. Now, a run lasts 3 issues. Dauterman is pulled after issue 4, McGuinnes drew 6 issues of Amazing, Asrar is taken after issue 4. It also makes sense they get “promotions” to high profile gigs, but I mean, bigger than working with Rucka? I wish there were more consistent runs like, say, Immonen on All-New X-Men, Bachalo on Uncanny or Ramos and Camuncoli on Spider-Man

Tracer, I was wondering the same thing. It’s not like the Shi’ar have a shortage of home-grown superhumans.

@Tracer Bullet

Wasn’t there something like accelerated aging involved as well? I want to recall that Vulcan wasn’t necessarily as old as his body appeared to be.

The Corsair/Vulcan origin story always makes me wish for a story where Katherine Summers gets some actual characterization. How much do we really know about her apart from her story function of getting menaced and killed in order to motivate Corsair and Vulcan to seek revenge? I would love to see a What If story where she DOESN’T get killed, and she joins Corsair in his fight against the Shi’ar (perhaps with a quick return to Earth to ask Scott and Alex to join them in their crusade). A whole family of space pirates…there’s some potential there…

but I mean, bigger than working with Rucka?

Rucka was already leaving the book.

Incidentally, do the Shiar and/or D’Ken have a particular hate for the Summers family? They put in a LOT of work growing Vulcan to adulthood if the plan was to make him a slave.

The conceit is that they typically do that with all of their slave labor, as adults obviously do more work than babies and little kids, ya know?

The conceit is that they typically do that with all of their slave labor, as adults obviously do more work than babies and little kids, ya know?

Wouldn’t it be easier to just go capture some more slaves than raise them for 18 years? We’re not talking about communities of slaves having kids, but the odd orphan from another planet.

es and no. Overall I agree with you, but I think sometimes your best artists can MAKE a low profile title into a high profile one. Cockrum on the X-Men and Miller on Daredevil for example.

Yeah, I wonder what the number differential would be. It seems to be you could take a great artist and put them on a 2nd or 3rd string book, and make it sell like a 1st string book, where Amazing Spider-Man will get a bump with a big name artist, but probably not much more than it sells with anyone drawing it. (At least comparatively) And is in no danger of being cancelled. So wouldn’t two well selling titles be better than just one mega-selling title?

Wouldn’t it be easier to just go capture some more slaves than raise them for 18 years? We’re not talking about communities of slaves having kids, but the odd orphan from another planet.

No, they artificially age them, so there is no time element.

So wouldn’t two well selling titles be better than just one mega-selling title?

It’s easier to raise sales on your popular titles than it is on your less popular titles. To wit, Walter Simonson couldn’t get Thor into the Top Ten despite being amazing on it but when he moved over to X-Factor on art it raised the book to #2 on Marvel’s sales charts (from about #4). To put that into modern terms, it is easier to bump a book selling 80,000 copies up to 100,000 copies than it is to raise a book selling 30,000 copies to 40,000 copies.

brian the brain

August 22, 2014 at 12:30 am

An important factor to contemplate it’s what the artists want to do. They are professional and make art for a living, so I guess Dauterman, Pichelli and so on are happier with the page rates and royalties from a GoTG or Thor book than what they could get drawing Cyclops and USM

brian the brain

August 22, 2014 at 12:40 am

To further elaborate, If we look at the artists that say long on the same book there are people like Samnee or Allred, that I really like but they have a style that does not lend itself to top list books or people like Bachalo and Ramos that while they keep drawing the same characters for years because they like them are helped by the fact that these are already top selling books.

Did Vulcan kill Corsair with his power? I thought Summers family-members were immune to each other’s energy blasts? Or is that just a Cyclops/Havok thing?

Did Vulcan kill Corsair with his power? I thought Summers family-members were immune to each other’s energy blasts? Or is that just a Cyclops/Havok thing?

Just the mutants are immune to their respective powers.

Leave a Comment

 

Categories

Review Copies

Comics Should Be Good accepts review copies. Anything sent to us will (for better or for worse) end up reviewed on the blog. See where to send the review copies.

Browse the Archives