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Knowledge Waits: All of DC’s Original Bloodlines Characters

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This is the latest in a feature where I just share some bit of comic book history that interests me. Here is a collection of all of the installments in the feature so far.

With the recent news that DC Comics is coming out with a new Bloodlines series later this year, I thought it would be fun to take a look at each of the characters (the “New Bloods”) who debuted as a result of the original 1993 Bloodlines crossover.

Enjoy!

I’m going to go in alphabetical order of the title of the comic the character debuted in.

First off, a quick refresher on the concept – aliens have landed on Earth and they are feasting on humans by drinking their spinal fluids and injecting parasites into humans as they eat. This kills most people. However, every so often, they feast on someone with a dormant “metagene,” and the parasites instead activate the person’s powers and we get a superhuman person.

In Action Comics Annual #5, by Jeph Loeb, Lee Moder and Joe Rubinstein, a jerky loose cannon cop gets into an accident and loses the use of his legs. He is about to go home and kill himself when he is approached by one of the aliens (who appears first as a beautiful woman before changing into her true form) and soon he wakes up as a hulking behemoth. He eventually regains his memories and begins to fight the aliens alongside “Superman” (actually the Eradicator – this was during the Reign of the Supermen storyline, where Superman was dead and a bunch of new Supermen showed up on Earth). He changes color depending on his mood. He ends up taking the name Loose Cannon…

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Loose Cannon got his own mini-series by Loeb and a young Adam Pollina.

In Adventures of Superman Annual #5, by Karl Kesel, Tom Grummett, Ed Hannigan and Andrew Pepoy, we meet a young woman, D.C. Force (wokka wokaa), from a whole family of superheroes who does not yet have powers of her own. She comes to Metropolis with her uncle (who can turn into a bear-like creature) the intent of getting the aliens to give her powers. She changes her mind at the last moment but it is too late and her powers are activated. She becomes Sparx and ends up as one of the best heroes from the whole storyline…

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I really liked Sparx. When I did a Top Five Bloodlines Characters years ago, she was #2 on the list (behind the obvious #1, which you will see later).

Sparx was a member of a short-lived superhero team made up of New Bloods called Blood Pack. Nearly all of Blood Pack’s members were slaughtered by Superboy Prime during Infinite Crisis. Sparx later joined Superboy and the Ravers (which was written by Kesel, as well), so she got a TON more character development than most of these characters.

In Batman Annual #17, by Doug Moench and Eduardo Barreto, we meet a Gotham SWAT team member who is ostracized because he is Korean-American. When his team gets slaughtered by the aliens, he survives and quickly decides to adopt his new armored body into crimefighting as Ballistic. He teams up with Batman (who is Jean-Paul Valley at this point, as Knightfall was running concurrently to Bloodlines)…

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Ballistic was also a member of Blood Pack.

In Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight Annual #3, by Denny O’Neil and Mike Manley, Luke McDonnell, Gray Morrow and Ricardo Villagran, a psycho killer hits up his half-brother, a priest, for some help while he is on the run. But when the authorities track them down, he takes the priest and the kids the priest is on a retreat with his hostage. Before he can begin killing the kids, though, the aliens show up and feast on both the killer and the priest.

The man survives, but he is now changed by the experience. He can heal people. He heals his brother, who awakes and ALSO has powers – he has the power to destroy. The whole “feasted on by an alien” has affected them differently. The good brother is now evil, calling himself Cardinal Sin and the evil brother is now good, calling himself Samaritan…

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Go to the next page for the next batch of New Bloods!

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73 Comments

I love that a guy named Ballistic is the voice of reason compared to AzBats.

And man, Jamm was the worst. And in this group, that’s saying something.

I liked a few of these characters, and was disappointed that the ones I liked hardly appeared after Bloodlines ended.

I thought Geist, Prisim, Lionheart and Gunfire were pretty good (I did not think much of Gunfire in his first appearance, but I picked up the last issue of his book for the Justice League and found I kind of liked him). Terrorsmith had potential, but then he turned out to be a good guy and was never seen again.

A lot of these characters seemed intentionally bad however. Then there was Loeb’s Loose Cannon, a Hulk rip off, except he had more than one color.

Sparx was pretty good too. I also liked that she came from a super powered family, like Clan Destine and Uncle Enar’s (?) family from some of Ray Bradbury’s stories.

Boy, the artist of page 49 of Action Comics Annual #5 (with Sparx) is doing a mighty fine impersonation of John Byrne art. I’m looking specifically at Superboy’s facial expressions, and the body language of all of the characters.

So one of them turns invisible in bright light, and another turns invisible in darkness? How did that get past the editors?

And even with amnesia, who would look at a random sign and assume it had their own name on it, like Anima did?

I liked Sparx, and I liked Myriad, partly because the backstory set her up so well.
But even the worst of them were more interesting than the aliens, who were duller than dirt.
Good job, Brian, I had forgotten quite a few of these.

The weirdest thing is where they start explaining their powers–so cheesy, especially when they somehow understand exactly how they work immediately.

“Again, there is this need to touch.”

Good Lord. No future babysitting gigs for Eradicator Superman.

I liked a number of the Bloodlines characters Myriad, Nightblade, Gunfire and Ballistic especially. I think the issue was writers were forced to make some of these characters, and didn’t have any use for them in their stories.

Also of note some of the Bloodlines characters formed a team post “Blood Pack” in the setup for James Robinson’s Justice League (New Year’s Evil?) can’t recall the other members, but it resulted in Hook and Anima being killed

Sparx was also a member of the Ravers.

Sparx, Argus, and Razorsharp were probably the best of the lot (sorry, never been a fan of Hitman).

Bloodlines drove me nuts for multiple reasons, not least of which was that when it was announced, it seemed most likely to be leading to something awesome. Remember, at this point (before Power of Shazam had happened), Captain Marvel hadn’t really gotten a lot of post-Crisis love from DC; we’d seen some previews of the seven evil, other-dimensional (!) demonic “aliens,” with design work by Arthur Adams; and all seven were very obviously based on the classic Seven Deadly Sins (Glonth was gluttonous, Pritor was arrogant, Lissik was seductive (gluttony, pride, lust) and so on)–so I thought, Aha, at last, finally this is going to lead up to them being a new re-imagined Seven Deadly Enemies of Man, and probably a new Captain Marvel series. But then it didn’t and there was no reason ever given for the whole parallel to the seven deadly sins at all (they just happened to match up in some sort of bizarre coincidence, I guess), and most of the new characters were just swept right on under the rug.

Some cool concepts were promptly ignored (did we ever see anything at all about that girl and her uncle and their family? The idea of a family of powered people in the DCU behind the scenes for generations could have been really cool). DC kind of did the same thing with Hypertime–we had some stuff in Superboy and not much else.

As noted above, David, Sparx and the Force family showed up in Superboy and the Ravers.

After reading what you wrote on the Man of Steel Annual I’m doubting if you even read any of these books or just checked Wikipedia. The Bloodlines mini WASN’T a “bookend” (like Armageddon and Eclipso before it), it was the last two chapters (called “Bloodbath”), and the first chapter of the story was the Lobo Annual, which I assume you didn’t read because you don’t mention that the whole story begins there. The second chapter was the Man of Steel Annual and then the rest and it ends with Bloodbath (end rant).

I’ve long thought that Jamm, the Prodigious Sex Offender is one of the worst comics characters ever created.

Argus to me is a character with a fair bit of potential; could’ve ended up becoming DC’s Daredevil analogue (the gag being he has enhanced sight, as opposed to DD’s enhanced senses to make up for lost sight)

I’d sure love to see a New 52 take on him, so long as he wears the costume featured in the follow-up mini.

And the kewl 1990s arrived at DC.

Sigh…

Can’t say I’m surprised that none of these guys, except Hitman, made it.

This has a whole lot of that DeFalco’s Fantastic Four vibe to it. That “dorky traditionalist superhero writers trying to be all Image Comics.”

Dorky guys can be cool, but they’re never cool when they actively try to be cool.

After reading what you wrote on the Man of Steel Annual I’m doubting if you even read any of these books or just checked Wikipedia. The Bloodlines mini WASN’T a “bookend” (like Armageddon and Eclipso before it), it was the last two chapters (called “Bloodbath”), and the first chapter of the story was the Lobo Annual, which I assume you didn’t read because you don’t mention that the whole story begins there. The second chapter was the Man of Steel Annual and then the rest and it ends with Bloodbath (end rant).

I knew that the Man of Steel was the second part (since the aliens land on Earth in the story), I just mixed up which issue the series began in, since I skipped re-reading the two Bloodlines issues for this piece because no characters debut in them, so I just assumed it began there. Fixed now, thanks!

Lots of memories here. Some not so good. I remember liking Nightblade and Layla though. And Anima, though not as popular as Hitman, was pretty popular and had her own series for over two years. That is pretty good.

But I don’t hold it against DC. It was one of their ‘let the writers and artists design whatever characters they want and see if any stick’ things. And a couple stuck and others sucked. So not bad overall. At least they seemed to let the creators make whatever kind of characters they wanted.

And Anima, though not as popular as Hitman, was pretty popular and had her own series for over two years. That is pretty good.

Like I noted, both she and Gunfire had ongoings that lasted a lot longer than you would expect. Granted, “a lot longer” meant that neither lasted past #15, but over a year is impressive in my book. They both even lasted long enough to get #0 issues from Zero Hour!

I’m not too sure on this revamped Bloodlines comic. To me, it feels like another attempt for DC to throw something at the walls in the hope it will stick. Plus, I’m still irked that a lot of these characters got thrown underneath the bus during Infinite Crisis. Shame that only Hitman ever got a chance to leave an impression but, such is the industry during the 90s. The new Bloodlines book might do well, but I feel like they should have done something more with the original characters rather than throwing out the baby with the bath water.

Still, I have a soft spot in my heart for Razorsharp, Terrorsmith, Nightblade, Loose Cannon, Ballistic, Argus, Mongrel, and Sparx. Yeah, they were DC Comics answer to 90s Image, but at least they had actual personality and talent behind them compared to the likes of Liefeld’s Youngblood. If anything, I’d love to see a revised version of Blood Pack that can homage the goofier side of the 90s while not repeating the mistakes most 90s books made (IE too much action, little story development, no origin story at the start, bad artwork, paper thin characters, and so on). Make a few adjustments to the characters (upgrading Razorsharp’s powers would be a start), get a talented creative team, and have them go to town.

As a HUGE fan of the story and concepts (though maybe not all the characters) I should submit these corrections.

Mongrel is half black half CAMBODIAN, not Vietnamese. Though I believe he’s accidentally CALLED Vietnamese in some promo work. Likely given some confusion as Hook was a Vietnam veteran.

Lionheart’s bite was INTERRUPTED and he received no powers.

Jamm’s story was basically to establish how badly he COULD use his powers but was basically taught not to.

No it’s Razorsharp and CHANNEL, not Hackrat who gain powers.

And while not in the series itself I’d say to also include Loria who was introduced in Showcase ’94 #12, she was made specifically to die in the Blood Pack mini.

And the MUCH later Freight Train from Outsiders (2010) issue 30.

I will have to get Superboy and the Ravers. :)

“OH MY GOD I TURNED MY ASS INTO A HAND GRENADE.”

While I’m thinking about it . .. what happened to the scarf around Tommy Monaghan’s neck? He looked better without it, but I’m curious.

^ ^ ^

So that mess of a character that appeared in Didio’s Outsiders (Freight Train) was supposed to be a New Blood? I must have blocked that part out…

Mongrel is half black half CAMBODIAN, not Vietnamese. Though I believe he’s accidentally CALLED Vietnamese in some promo work. Likely given some confusion as Hook was a Vietnam veteran.

Thanks, I’ll fix that!

Lionheart’s bite was INTERRUPTED and he received no powers

I’ll admit I stopped reading it once the alien got its mouth-thing into his neck. I’ll amend it!

Jamm’s story was basically to establish how badly he COULD use his powers but was basically taught not to.

He really was not taught anything. They tried, but the only “lesson” he learned was to not screw with Shadow Lass.

No it’s Razorsharp and CHANNEL, not Hackrat who gain powers.

Thanks! I’ll change that.

And while not in the series itself I’d say to also include Loria who was introduced in Showcase ’94 #12, she was made specifically to die in the Blood Pack mini.

And the MUCH later Freight Train from Outsiders (2010) issue 30.

I mentioned Loria in Nightblade’s entry, but yeah, as you noted, neither of them came from the Bloodlines event, so I didn’t count either one of ‘em here.

Hmm, well, fair enough with Jamm. I kinda figure regardless of the reasoning the lesson sunk in since he never acted the way he did again. Of course he also wasn’t used again anyway to my knowledge outside of Bloodlines/Bloodabth as well.

I figure had he been used again his stories might focus largely on what’s right or good that he COULD do with powers like these that are stereotypical BAD GUY powers.

I’m unsure what the Bierbaums were thinking with Jamm. They were on the way out from DC at the time (their Legion run ended just a month or two later), so I tend to think that they were sort of taking the Grell approach of, “Here, I wrote a story to your specifications, see ya later!” As Grell surely had no plans to ever use The Hook again, ya know? So I think they likely just were going for a Bill and Ted meet the Legion sort of vibe with the story and didn’t think past that. And the more important part of the story was to get Timber Wolf back to the future for the end of their run, where he plays a key role in their final issue.

Shadowstrike? Truly the only way that name could be more 90s is if it was spelt Shadowstryke………

Shadowstrike? Truly the only way that name could be more 90s is if it was spelt Shadowstryke………

Take another look at the spelling. ;)

Superboy and the Ravers was fun. Just like Superboy used to be before Johns’ emo Son of Luthor interpretation.

Gunfire was enjoyable in a light-hearted way.

Still, when I think of great characters who DC never made enough use of, the new blood are not high on the list.

I remember these…and some of them fondly. A couple updates:

Terrorsmith was killed off in Grant Morrison’s JLA. Really!

That issue with Anima and Hook’s deaths was New Year’s Evil.

There was a JSA Classified arc where someone was stealing metahuman organs. Argus lost his eyes

Gunfire’s dad actually came back as a villain in his series…which bored me to death.

I still find it funny that ’93 was also where Marvel introduced all new characters in Annuals as well…including the best character EVER, Adam-X the X-Treme!

An intercompany crossover between X-Treme and Jamm needs to happen. Anyone? Anyone?

“Terrorsmith was killed off in Grant Morrison’s JLA. Really!”

People have said that to me in the past but…no…he didn’t. They say he was the character killed off in JLA #1 but that was a minor supervillain called Judgement. Who first showed up in Justice League America #96 he looks like Terrorsmith in only the vaguest of ways but Terrorsmith he is not.

http://comicbookdb.com/graphics/comic_graphics/1/228/14260_20071201141115_large.jpg

“That issue with Anima and Hook’s deaths was New Year’s Evil.”
Face’s of Evil: Prometheus actually.

“There was a JSA Classified arc where someone was stealing metahuman organs. Argus lost his eyes.”

Yep., Loose Cannon had his…heart stolen I believe as well though he later regenerated it or somesuch.

Marvel had a similar concept in some 1990s annual: introduce a new character

I started picking up a lot of these in back issue bins once the whole to-do died down. A lot of the stories weren’t too bad, but a lot of them weren’t too good, either.

Either way, though, I’d take nearly any of these heroes (with the possible exception of Jamm) over Superboy Prime any day of the millennium. And Jamm strikes me as very similar to Marvel’s Starfox.

Bloodlines proves one thing: It isn’t easy to create a successful superhero.

Jamm’s closest Marvel equivalent would be the Purple Man, really. Same power of him telling you to do something and you say, “Okay.” The power wasn’t specific to making women dig him; he just used it that way because he’s a sleaze.

Superboy and the Ravers was a fun series. There was a development with Sparx’s character late in the day that I didn’t like at the time, but now feel was pretty bold. Showing that not all will be all inclusive or accepting of others lifestyles. So hate the fact that after it got canned, virtually everyone in it disappeared and would never be seen again. Loved Anima and Gunfire. Loose Cannon had a pretty nice mini series that was leading him into the Metropolis Special Crimes Unit, but then nothing came of it.

When Mongrel says ‘School is hereby cancelled until further notice,’ given the way he looks in that panel, does anyone else think he’s riffing on Alice Cooper? “School’s out forever!”

Nu-D, you mean Adventures of Superman annual #5… I see what you mean, that Superboy’s smile in panel 2 is based on Byrne art (and some of the poses), but I would never have spotted it if I hadn’t read your comment.

Xander –

Superboy Prime vs. Bloodlines.

That is a tough call.

The Bloodlines heroes were influenced by a style that I really hate, and they suck big time (minus Hitman) but at least you can safely ignore them if you don’t like them. Most people did just that.

Superboy Prime took a old and cool concept, totally ruined it, and kept at it, making it a central role in several major events.

So yeah, I think any of these guys is better than Superboy Prime.

AverageJoeEveryman

January 22, 2016 at 11:44 am

Loved all these and the Marvel annuals from that time that tried to introduce new characters to almost no success. Also am I the only one that spells it “WAKKA WAKKA”?

Also am I the only one that spells it “WAKKA WAKKA”?

I think the “official” spelling is actually neither, but “wocka wocka.” I like the double Ks, myself.

So was it worth all that time, money, and effort, just for Hitman? Probably.

I’d say the problem with these characters is they’ll mostly never succeed when everyone has the same origin, because it makes it more of a stunt than a creation, but then if you pull the crossover out of it you end up with the Battlin’ Bantam and such. We probably don’t give Lee and Kirby and their ilk enough credit, because creating new characters is apparently really hard; which is why we’re stuck with repurposed identities of our heroes than strong new creations.

M-Wolverine –

An unified origin is good when they start new superhero universes, for suspension of disbelief reasons. Wild Cards, Marvel’s New Universe, TV’s The Flash… But it makes less sense for characters being introduced into an already existing superhero universe with magic, aliens, power rings, gods, Atlantis, speed force, etc. Then it just looks lazy.

Loose Cannon – I know that most names were already taken in 90’s but talk about using imagination, they basically wanted to sell you a toy instead of telling a substantial story with a new character. Hopefully the new Bloodlines will introduce better characters like maybe Maul.
Curious what other (less successful at the time) event crossovers could be updated and remade.

Rene I think it works fine in most of those instances, but in something like the Flash it starts to get to the point of “how many people did that blast affect??” And really ties you up when you want super powers to develop elsewhere or at a different time. I mean the world now has immortals and hawk-people that weren’t around for anything in Central City…so its limits come up fast. Better to a world where Superman was the first, and others just follow because it’s possible. People’s suspension of disbelief is better than most give credit for (Thor won’t work as a movie! No one will accept the Avengers! Flash too unreal in Arrowverse!). And as above, the internal suspension of disbelief is more important than the outer. Believe a guy can get powers; have a hard time believing EVERYONE got powers from one thing. Believe a man can fly; don’t believe Superman suddenly gets super saran-wrap S powers and finger beams when he needs it.

Honestly a shared origin for powers isn’t exactly bad. I mean Stan Lee even got tired of making contrived origins that’s why he made MUTANTS a thing.

M-Wolverine –

While an event like the one in the Flash can’t affect the past (except by some time travel explanation), I think it is more flexible than it appears at first. You can say the effect was centered on Central City (that is why it’s called Central?), but the particles can travel anywhere, and once you got that super-energy in people, the existing superhumans can, under some special circunstances, transmit that super-energy to other people and create more heroes and villains.

But yeah, if you can stretch that one event enough with such techno-babble and make people buy it, then you might as well introduce other events. So you might have a point there.

FuryOfFirestorm

January 22, 2016 at 8:26 pm

Hitman was the only character from the event that gained any traction. A handful of them died during Infinite Crisis, while the rest ended up forgotten in Comic Book Limbo. Which is a shame, because Myriad had an interesting backstory and powers.

The only ones I really remembered were Anima, Chimera, and (ugh) Jamm. I read the Anima series (found a full run for cheap) and wondered why such a trippy series wasn’t under the Vertigo umbrella; the central plot revolved around people who were bound to Jungian archetypes and ended with a character having a dream sequence with beloved artists who’d killed themselves debating the pros & cons of death. Not what you’d expect from the punk girl with energy powers in the annual. And it’s a bummer she was killed off, since the concept of someone summoning an archetype as a power was kind of cool (at least to me).

Chimera would’ve worked in a team book, but I think the mere stigma of being connected to Team Titans, a hot mess of a series, probably shunted her into limbo. At least she hasn’t been killed off for crossover stakes, it seems.

And while I will defend the Bierbaums’ work on Legion, Jamm is so singularly awful that reminding me he existed makes me wonder if the blanket dismissals of the 5YL run are correct. This is the one guy people would thank Geoff Johns for killing off.

Who thought it was a good idea to name a mixed superhero Mongrel?

Awful character design aside, there is surprisingly good artwork in some of these annuals. Dwyer and Garcia-Lopez?!?

Every time someone mentions the Battlin’ Bantam, I get a craving for a bucket of KFC, extra crispy.

always thought like hitman some of the blood line characters like night blade and prism would be cool if given a chance. others like gunfire and mongrel sound like writers were just doing a what ever hits the wall and sticks thing plus one has to wonder if some of the creators of the characters on this list were smoking something at dc

Sparx’s Dan Haggerty-like “Uncle Bear” (who winds up naked after turning into a bear) seemed like a bow to the gay bear community, which was just becoming known to the public at the time.

Who thought it was a good idea to name a mixed superhero Mongrel?

It made some sort of sense in the original comic, but once he got past that, he really, really needed to change his name.

“I think the mere stigma of being connected to Team Titans, a hot mess of a series, probably shunted her into limbo”

I found Team Titans to be a suprisingly good book. At least until the original writer (Wolfman?) left.
Then they did things like forgot the obvious idea that the Judge was going to turn out to be a woman.

It’d be good to see a coda of the actual fates of most of these characters.
I think Sparx was the one who got most traction in the DCU, appearing in several comics and teams afterwards.
Anima had the longest solo run, 15 or so issues before disappearing from view, reappearing only to be ripped in half.
Gunfire will forever remain in my heart for the Hitman 1,000,000 appearance.
Argus was a minor character in Flash for a while before being murdered. Ballistic eventually joined an incarnation of the Forgotten Heroes.
I’m hazy on exactly who went where but almost all the characters who didn’t immediately fall into limbo suffered violent and bloody ends as cannon-fodder for various books/ events during DC’s ugly era.

I think Sparx was the one who got most traction in the DCU, appearing in several comics and teams afterwards.
Anima had the longest solo run, 15 or so issues before disappearing from view, reappearing only to be ripped in half.

Hehe, you even referenced Hitman in your comment! :)

I’ll back the like for Loose Cannon: Sure, you could see him as Mood Ring Hulk, but I dug that his backstory was basically ‘wounded and disabled cop gets bit, changes into superhuman form, and then changes back at daybreak.’ It was handled remarkably well for a concept that, on its face, could be seen as very silly. Sparx as well, as she was awesome in Superboy and the Ravers.

Whatever happened to myriad? That issue of superman creeped me right out as a kid

I’d love to see this kind of article based on the New Character Annuals that Marvel did around the same time.
Who did it first, btw?

@Pez-La:

Yeah, Brian touched on those in this piece, but it would be fun to get the full rundown.

Both companies did those in their 1993 annuals, so I don’t know if either one of them was first. If so, it would only be by a meaningless matter of months.

Oneminutemonkey

January 27, 2016 at 3:34 pm

A handful of good or potentially good characters. A whole mess of mediocre characters. A handful of truly awful ones.

And so many blades, knives, and other sharp things. Sheesh!

Now we definitely need the Marvel equivalent if just to see what sort of success rate Marvel had. (The X-Terminator! Adam-X! BANTAM THE BATTLING CHICKEN BOXER!)

@Brian Cronin
D’oh. And yes, I have Hitman. Just think of him as nearly a seperate parody book than really a part of the DCU.

So 90s, A shame, because they tried to create a diverse array of characters, and they didn’t stick.

Mike Grell talks about The Hook and the scenario behind these annuals. Details are at the 37:30 mark of http://www.thecomicbooks.com/Audio/08-04-12-HobbyStar-MenofIronPanel.mp3
The audio file is a Men of Iron Panel / Sketch off, which took place at Hobby Star Toronto ComiCON 2008 (April 12-13). Also on the panel is David Michelinie & Bob Layton. Much of it has to do with their time on Iron Man.

In short, DC told creators that they had to create a new character and it would owned by DC under work made for hire. This is something creators really didn’t like and it’s likely why there were a bunch of not that great characters created.

Thanks, Jamie! That makes a TON of sense. Wow, the balls that would take for DC to do that. Insane.

I notice you’re also doing one on the Marvel Annuals that also created new characters. David Michelinie said it was the same scenario for the Marvel annuals, where Marvel would own those characters. Michelinie said he declined to do the annual (he was writing Amazing Spider-Man at the time).

Wow, what galls me the most is that both DC and Marvel even had a whole set-up in place at the time for creators to get a piece of their new creations and they specifically bypassed it for these annuals? Ludicrous!

Thanks for the great info, Jamie.

[…] the Comics Can Be Good column at CBR, Brian Cronin writes about the 1993 DC Bloodlines Annuals. In these annuals a new superhero character was created, which was a selling point to get fans to […]

I actually enjoyed the Jeph Loeb/Adam Pollina Loose Cannon mini-series. It’s what essentially made me a fan of Loeb’s work (well, his older stuff…)

I remember reading Anima too, but giving up on it probably around is 10 or so while trying to cut back on my monthly spending habits…

[…] CSBG’s Knowledge Waits: All of DC’s Original Bloodlines Characters […]

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