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CSBG Archive

Comic Book Legends Revealed #564

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Welcome to the five hundred and sixty-fourth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the first five hundred (I actually haven’t been able to update it in a while). This week, was Deadpool’s roommate, Blind Al, supposed to be the first Black Widow? Is Alan Moore banned from the United States by the CIA? And was one of the 1993 Marvel Annuals characters just the Dungeons and Dragons character of the Annual’s writer?

Let’s begin!

NOTE: The column is on three pages, a page for each legend. There’s a little “next” button on the top of the page and the bottom of the page to take you to the next page (and you can navigate between each page by just clicking on the little 1, 2 and 3 on the top and the bottom, as well).

COMIC LEGEND: Deadpool’s roommate, Blind Al, was originally going to be the first Black Widow (and she was the responsible for Deadpool getting cancer).

STATUS: True

Deadpool’s roommate, Blind Al, played by Leslie Uggams, was a scene-stealer in the Deadpool movie…

blindalmovie

And in the comics, Blind Al, Deadpool’s housemate/prisoner, was also a scene-stealer, like when they went back in time to an old issue of Amazing Spider-Man in Deadpool #11 (by Joe Kelly and Pete Woods) and Al impersonated Aunt May…

blindal

However, we never really got TOO much info into Blind Al’s background outside of the disturbing as heck Deadpool #14, where she explains some of the messed up stuff Deadpool has done to her as his prisoner (while maintaining that she sort of owes it to Deadpool to stay with him).

So anyhow, in Deadpool #25, by Joe Kelly and Walter McDaniel, Deadpool is dealing with a huge crisis of confidence as he debates whether to essentially destroy peace on Earth for the sake of freeing everyone on Earth from being mind-controlled into becoming peaceful.

Blind Al gives him a pep talk…

deadpool25a

At the end of the issue, after Deadpool successfull “saves” Earth after defeating a possessed Captain America, Captain America comes across something familiar to him…

deadpool25b

That plot was never resolved…in the comics, that is.

Joe Kelly, in an interview with Comic Book Resources’ Robert Taylor, revealed his original plans for Blind Al:

We were going to do the origin story of Blind Al, and show her as the original Black Widow and show how she was responsible for Wade getting cancer.

By “original,” this doesn’t mean the actual Golden Age character named Black Widow, but rather a 1940s version of the current Black Widow, Natasha (the one in the Avengers).

That story could still be told! Come on, Joe Kelly is writing Deadpool again in Spider-Man/Deadpool! There’s still time!

For now, all we have is this…

BWIDOW2014011-DC21-LR-8f83b

Thanks to Joe Kelly and Robert Taylor for the information!

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Check out some recent entertainment and sports legends from Legends Revealed:

Did a Woman Accidentally Get a Speaking Role in a Star Trek Movie?

Was the Brady Bunch’s Dog Replaced Mid-Episode Because Their Original Dog Was Killed?

Why Were Two Little League Teams Each Trying to Lose in the Final Inning of a Playoff Game?

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On the next page, did the CIA keep Alan Moore out of the Untied States because he pissed them off?

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63 Comments

Why do the text and the header disagree about which number legend this is?

I don’t think that Al/Black Widow COULD be told now, Brian, as JMS’s THE TWELVE showed what happened to the original Black Widow after the war – she got stuffed into suspended animation and only came out in the present day.

I know Alan Moore won’t come to comic conventions in the states after being mobbed by fans at one in the mid-eighties, but to hear him explain why he never travels to the states to just not caring about renewing a passport makes me giggle. For some reason he reminds me of a tall, scary Hobbit just sitting in his Hobbit-hole doing whatever he pleases and not caring one bit about what the outside world thinks…

That was my first thought too, but given the hammer and sickle medallion, I’m not sure she was supposed to be the Golden Age Black Widow, but the first Russian Black Widow. That could totally still happen.

@Chris McFeely I assume they mean the original in the line of Russian spies created in their Black Widow program, not the golden age comics character who had magical powers and a much different schtick…

At first I thought that’s who they meant as well, Chris–the “Claire Voyant” version empowered by Satan or whatever to bring justice to evil-doers.

Now I wonder if they meant that she was going to be the first of the Black Widows from the Soviet Union courtesy of the Red Room, a precursor to Natasha. Huh.

I usually hate Mary Sues, but adapting your D&D character into the Marvel Universe is so nerdy that it crosses the line again into awesomeness Kudos to Evan Skolnick.

Superconnectivity

February 26, 2016 at 10:49 am

@Chris McFeely, I think this is a differnt Black Widow, based on the fact that it is a Soviet Medal Steve has, I am guessing the Black Widow being referenced is different than the Black Widow seen in The Twelve. That Black Widow was a mystical being, and Blind Al doesn’t seem Mystical. So my guess is this is a Black Widow from the 1940’s Black Widow Program that eventually gave us Natasha Romanov. So she is the Golden Age Black Widow in the way Aleksey Lebedev is the Golden Age Red Gaurdian. He is set in that time period even though he wasn’t a character in the actual time period known as the Golden Age. So essentially they are suggesting Blind Al is the equivilent of Dottie Underwood from the current Agent Carter series (another Golden Age character not actually from the Golden Age).

I remember the Cap/Al connection Kelly placed (I still think his is the best DP run, and that Spider-Man time travel issue is hysterical); I didn’t know about the Black Widow plans, or that Al would have been responsible for Wade’s cancer. It certainly explains why she put up with his crap, and endured all of his abuse, though.

Man, I would pay you good money to not show any more overwrought 90’s art.

Yeah, I was gonna say, “Oh, you don’t mean the actual Golden Age Black Widow. You mean an as yet unknown Soviet Black Widow active in the Golden Age.” But it looks like everybody already beat me to that.

Superconnectivity

February 26, 2016 at 11:03 am

Wait, Blind Al and Cap dated in the 40’s too? While he was Dating Betsy Ross and Peggy Carter? That guy gets around more than Dobbie Gillis.

Becca Danny's Wife

February 26, 2016 at 11:05 am

I’ve seen worse ideas, SuperC…. that could be a lot of fun, especially with the way Dottie is being characterized in the current series.

Joe Kelly PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE make Blind Al be the elderly comic book version of “Dottie Underwood”.

Did the C.I.A. even cared about BROUGHT TO LIGHT at all?

“Did the C.I.A. even cared about BROUGHT TO LIGHT at all?”

Can’t imagine that they did.

“Hey, Chief, some hairy giant in England wrote a comic book that criticizes the CIA.”

“. . . Get back to work, Johnson.”

I’m with Rene. Kinda going back to the original article, the chance to “immortalize” your D&D character, and so blatantly (though I can’t say it clicked other than as a D&D riff at the time) seems awesome to me.

Yeah, before Sacco and Rall, Ottaviani and Cunningham, there was Alan Moore trying to push the medium, what else is new? But one can’t help notice how Brought To Light has been conveniently out of print. Surely a coincidence, just as for that graphic exposé about the CIA’s Operation Ajax cancelled by Diamond last year?

Evan Skolnick uses an outdated definition for a “Mary Sue”. It did start with an idealized avatar of a female fanfic author, but beyond that it’s been used for any obnoxiously perfect or infallible female character. After The Force Awakens, Rey has been called a Mary Sue for this reason.

I had always heard that Blind Al was supposed to be Ms. America or some other established golden age heroine, but this is way more interesting.

hahaha

Alan Moore’s the best. It’s amazing to me that he’s been giving tongue-in-cheek interviews for over 20 years and some fans/bloggers are still such social misfits that they think everything he says is 100% literal no matter how many times he spells it out right in front of them to not take it so seriously.

I can see Comics Alliance’s headline tomorrow: “Alan Moore Says Comic Books ‘silly-arse,’ Hates the Community, New Creators, and Especially Women.”

Other than Moore-not-wanting-to, the most difficult logistic of getting him to travel overseas is more likely to involve the DEA than the CIA.

@Tom Fitzpatrick
The comic community, at large, didn’t care about Brought to Light, or even saw it. i doubt the CIA looked at any comic of the period.

Well, maybe Reagan’s Raiders.

Be funny if Evan Skolnick wanted to play a game of D&D, then found out he needed Marvel comics permission to use his old character. ;-)

Superconnectivity – “Wait, Blind Al and Cap dated in the 40’s too? While he was Dating Betsy Ross and Peggy Carter? That guy gets around more than Dobbie Gillis.”

I’m now imagining Cap in Pop Tate’s sharing a soda with all three gals. ;-)

Evan Skolnick uses an outdated definition for a “Mary Sue”. It did start with an idealized avatar of a female fanfic author, but beyond that it’s been used for any obnoxiously perfect or infallible female character. After The Force Awakens, Rey has been called a Mary Sue for this reason.

He used the correct definition. The Force Awakens critics are using the term incorrectly. And are wrong in general about Rey besides that, but especially wrong about using the term “Mary Sue” as part of their wrong critiques. I’m all for the growth of language and the evolution of terms (and when things are close, it’s just douchey to quibble), but “Mary Sue” is such a specific term that it seems bizarre to try to expand it in such a manner. It’s like calling Felix Hernandez a southpaw and when told that no, King Felix is a right-handed pitcher, saying, “Oh yeah, no, southpaw is now used to describe pitchers in general, so the term still applies.” It seems like a pointless expansion that just makes the term useless.

I remember when the 1993 issue of Marvel: The Year In Review did a criticism of the characters from the annuals, the comment for Khaos was something like “You know that sinking feeling you get in the pit of your stomach when some D&D nerd insists on telling you all about his character? Khaos gives you that in spades.”
.
I wonder if the writer of that article knew how accurate they were.
(As a D&D player, I found the comment mildly insulting, but I know better than to babble about the game in normal conversation to random people.)

That and some people ‘Mary Sue’ for any new character they do not like. I know I have seen Aztek referred to as a ‘Mary Sue’ because he got JLA membership, every new X-Man is called a ‘Mary Sue’. If the correct definition has been abandoned, then ‘Mary Sue’ is just a slur for ‘new character I hate’.

My last post was in response to Brian’s, not Armitage’s.

On point, on the Brought to Life segment; I think Eclipse hoped it would be more controversial than it was. It got a little coverage in the comic press, because it was Alan Moore and Bill Sienkiewicz. The subject matter tended to get glossed over, in the articles I read, at the time. I don’t recall any non-comic coverage. These types of projects, at Eclipse, tended to be cat yronwode’s babies and she seemed to come across as a relic of the 60s. As such, books like this and Real War Stories tended to be met with indifference, especially in the Reagan 80s. Eclipse’s big sellers were action/adventure stuff, like Scout and prestige works, like Miracleman. Had Moore and Siekiewicz not been involved, I doubt you would have seen any coverage other than Eclipse’s house ads, which they also placed in CBG. The Comics Journal might have run an article, sandwhiched between their latest rant against the mainstream and the interview with a mainstream creator.

The only time I can recall Eclipse ever really generating controversy was when they released their crime trading cards and had threats of lawsuits and some attention from a few conservative attorney generals, who were looking to score political points. However, it blew over quickly and their chronic cash flow problems finally caught up with them and put an end to the company.

And, from what I read about Alan Moore, he admitted one time he’s no good traveler due to his near-sighted eyes. Speaking of Moore, can you dug up why his BIG NUMBERS never ever completed? Was there conflict between him and his artist then? Thanks.

“Surely a coincidence, just as for that graphic exposé about the CIA’s Operation Ajax cancelled by Diamond last year?”

That particular printing was cancelled; it has since come out in both physical and digital formats:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/operation-ajax-mike-de-seve/1120723927

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cia-operation-ajax-interactive/id472099770?mt=8

“And are wrong in general about Rey besides that”

Not to drag this thing into an OT flame, but name one thing that she wasn’t good at, or didn’t master without any prior experience or knowledge, or wasn’t indulged in without any good reason.

On the original topic… holy crap that CIA topic is terrifying. If half of the things in it have any truth, it’s a wonder we’re all not radioactive ash, or a swimming-pool statistic, by now.

@Warren B
how about “Knowing to switch off the safety on a gun before shooting someone with it”?

as to what she did do
she was a skilled pilot and mechanic before the film
in the Lightsaber duel at the end she fought off (but did not defeat) Rey with a Force-inspired moment like Like had when he destroyed the Death star, and Ren was already injured and suffering from internal conflict which damaged his connection to the Force

Anonymous –

Mary Sues can be of any gender. I know there are people who prefer Gary Stu or Marty Stu for the male version, though.

I’m afraid one of the real reasons for Brought to Light to have been overlooked, besides being from a small publisher and such like Jeff Netterton said, is that it’s an earlier instance of Alan Moore being all didactic.

But I also think Brought to Light is pretty good, The shitty things the CIA has pulled never got enough exposure in American fiction and pop culture, sadly. Also, the plethora of right-wing dictatorships the CIA has helped out in Latin America is under-represented in fiction and entertainment. Yeah, not all authoritarian societies in the 20th century have been communist, islamic or otherwise anti-American.

The CIA really bugs me!

The Marvel Super Heroes RPG was published in 1984. I wonder how many “rolled up” characters eventually made it into actual comics?

Whenever I see a bunch of new characters in a comic (complete with splash page and ID labels) I think to myself “this writer is just plugging some sorry-ass characters he rolled up when he was a kid.”

@Robert G:
For example, Exodus and various other characters (mostly mutants) who had random laundry lists of powers with absolutely no common theme.

The CIA got some heavy scrutiny, coming out of Vietnam and had their fangs dulled, during the Carter Administration, though they still had fingers in pies. The gloves came off again, in the Reagan years, especially in relation to Latin America (especially Nicaragua). The School of the Americas, a military counter-guerilla training center, is the alma mater of many of the world’s worst torturers. Yep, the CIA was involved in some nasty stuff. However, so were most of the intelligence and counter-intelligence organizations of our allies and enemies. That world tends to breed nastiness, no matter what culture. Victor Ostrovsky’s expose of the MOSSAD revealed all kinds of schenanigans, especially industrial espionage of the US and other friendly nations. James Bond it ain’t! MI-5 and MI-6 have all kinds of skeletons in their closet, as do the French security services (including attacks on Greenpeace, in conjunction with their nuclear testing, in the Pacific).

I was pretty into the indies, by this point; but, I did not encounter Brought to Light, or A Small Killing in a comic book store, when they were released. I only saw one issue of Big Numbers turn up in my local. I got the second issue of Real War Stories at my local comic shop; but, have never come across a copy of the first issue, in the wild. That could be the frustrating thing with comic shops and independent companies. I saw more Love & Rockets in record shops than comic shops. Eclipse could be especially hard to find (Fantagraphics moreso). For years, they made their money off of their mail order business, filling the gaps in collections of people who discovered their books (usually in progress). However, a major flood destroyed a very large chunk of their inventory and their cash flow never really recovered. One of the reasons that some of their books were delayed was that they had trouble finding printers who would print their books, without payment up front; or at least, that’s what Mike Grell said held up the 2nd and 3rd issues of his James Bond: Permission to Die mini-series.

I remember when the 1993 issue of Marvel: The Year In Review did a criticism of the characters from the annuals, the comment for Khaos was something like “You know that sinking feeling you get in the pit of your stomach when some D&D nerd insists on telling you all about his character? Khaos gives you that in spades.”
.
I wonder if the writer of that article knew how accurate they were.

Khaos creator Evan Skolnick himself edited the 1993 issue of Marvel: The Year in Review, so I presume the writers of that article (Tom Brevoort was one of them) knew very well what the deal was.

I’ve been reading I, Mage lately, and it actually has the characters’ d6 stats published as an extra in the back.

I’m all for the growth of language and the evolution of terms (and when things are close, it’s just douchey to quibble), but “Mary Sue” is such a specific term that it seems bizarre to try to expand it in such a manner. It’s like calling Felix Hernandez a southpaw and when told that no, King Felix is a right-handed pitcher, saying, “Oh yeah, no, southpaw is now used to describe pitchers in general, so the term still applies.” It seems like a pointless expansion that just makes the term useless.

I agree! It’s like calling a Russian agent the first Black Widow, and when told that the first Black Widow was an American named Claire who killed people for Satan, saying, “Oh yeah, first is now used to describe a hypothetical retro version of the second, so the term still applies.”

Brian is quite correct! In fact I’m pretty sure I wrote that Khaos hit piece myself.

As the editor of the satirical versions of MYIR (’92 and ’93) I was determined to make sure that my own stuff was skewered at least as viciously as anyone else’s. :-)

— Evan

And are wrong in general about Rey besides that, but especially wrong about using the term “Mary Sue” as part of their wrong critiques.

Care to expand on that? I think I agree with you, but I’m not entirely sure how you mean it.

For example, Exodus and various other characters (mostly mutants) who had random laundry lists of powers with absolutely no common theme.

OMG, that would make so much sense. Somewhere along the line we lost the “theme” for a hero…he has the powers that are like a spider, or he has eye beams, or whatever, and everyone started returning to the Superman mish-mash of powers. Which particularly made little sense if you were a mutant. “Yeah, you mutated into a guy who can…have superpowers.” It was all so lazy and generic.

And as much as I loved the D&D character before, I love even more that Evan skewered the character for that himself. Khaos needs to be brought back just for all that.

Care to expand on that? I think I agree with you, but I’m not entirely sure how you mean it.

Mary Sue? I mean Rey is not an author-insertion character, so Mary Sue doesn’t apply to describe her.

I think I mean more on the “in general beside that” part. Because I’m not sure what you’re getting at, but I think I’d side with you on that. Your first point that she doesn’t fit the definition of Mary Sue without bending the definition to the point it has no meaning was clear and obviously correct.

Aha, gotcha. Sure, the folks trying to work “Mary Sue” into their arguments are the ones whose main criticism is “Rey is good at too many things.” “Character X is bad because Character X is good at too many things” is a cuckoo bananas criticism. There’s not even any need to rattle off the long, long list of characters who are good at a bunch of things that no one ever said were bad characters because of it because it doesn’t even need to go that far – it’s a silly criticism on its face.

“Good at too many things” is an intensifier. If you already likes the character, then it makes them even cooler. If you already dislikes the character, it turns dislike into hatred.

That’s what I was going for. And yes, I agree wholeheartedly. And what you say Rene is true too. But the question is what about the character is it that makes one dislike her? From my posting history I don’t think anyone sees me as someone who sees this type of thing around every corner, but I’d have to say the only thing I see that people object to her having this characteristic is that it’s a “her.”

It’s funny coming from the sci fi/geek crowd, because as Brian says, there’s no limit to characters like that. No one has a problem with Batman or James Bond. (And really, up till Batman Begins, it’s never been “earned” for those guys).

If someone has a reason they don’t like her that doesn’t involve “she’s too good at things” I’d be open to hear it. I’m definitely on the “even cooler” side, because she was already ridiculously charming and well acted for a newbie actress, and basically stole the show for me. Which was not anything I expected or planned on going into the movie. The fact that the characters aren’t diminished on the same screen as Han frickin’ Solo says a lot of JJ’s strengths as a filmmaker, as opposed to the flaws he has that he regularly gets raked over the coals for on the web.

At risk of losing all my nerd cred, I have to admit that I still didn’t watch the new Star Wars movie, so I can’t really say anything about the characters.

But the question is what about the character is it that makes one dislike her? From my posting history I don’t think anyone sees me as someone who sees this type of thing around every corner, but I’d have to say the only thing I see that people object to her having this characteristic is that it’s a “her.”

Great question. It’d be interesting to hear others explain why they don’t like her.

As far as I can tell, the people complaining about Rey are saying the film should have been at least twice as long with the pace slowed down with lots of clips of the backgound of all of the characters showing everything significant from the characters lives to date and not leave anything to the viewer’s imagination or later books, comics, etc.

A more likely explanation is they are objecting to her being female, not being overshadowed by a man and not wearing an outfit they find sufficiently sexy…

(though a lot of them are probably just echoing opinions of other people rather as thinking for themselves is too much like hard work).

@ John King

So now any criticism of a female character is to be simply handwaved away as being sexist? Yeah, sounds about rght these days.

So now any criticism of a female character is to be simply handwaved away as being sexist? Yeah, sounds about rght these days.

In this specific instance, the “she’s good at too many things!” criticism is so stupid that I agree that it almost detracts from the stupidity by labeling it as sexist, as then people could say stuff like, “You’re just handwaving the criticism as being sexist” to distract from just how moronic the criticism is.

Alaric Shapli

March 7, 2016 at 3:38 am

Jim Harris-

“So now any criticism of a female character is to be simply handwaved away as being sexist? ”

So now any defense of a female character is to be simply handwaved away as being “because she’s female”?

Rene- I haven’t seen it yet, either. I even had to stop reading one of the webcomics I follow to avoid too many spoilers.

Jim –

Not necessarily sexism. To me, it looks more a matter of partisanship. Like, “those darned SJW folks are in favor of these diversity-driven characters? Then I must be against!” The cultural war seems so heated in the Internet these days that I can see some Conservatives spitting out the chocolate they’ve been eating after reading that SJWs have adopted pro-chocolate positions.

Jim, not any. But we’re trying to think of any in this case. Do you have any examples of what was wrong with the character? That’s what I asked. If you don’t have any examples, then you’re kinda proving the point you’re decrying.

@Jim
any criticism of a character which is dumb or arbitarily assigned to one character should be handwaved away regardless of the gender of the character.

In the case of Rey, the main criticism I am hearing is that the story doesn’t explain how she acquires her skills.
Luke Skywalker becoming a top fighter-pilot overnight is regarded as okay because of supplementary material created after the film to explain it. Maybe, new material expanding on Rey’s back story explaining when and why she learned to understand Wookies, etc will make her more acceptable though I suspect such criticisms are just an excuse.
Personally, I can accept that the majority of her life was not shown in the film and have no problems with her acquiring skills in scenes not shown (and I believe the film would be worse if it was filled with such flashbacks).

The film as is:
“How’d Rey learn to speak Wookiee/fly a ship/do anything well? That’s ridiculous!”

The film with a scene detailing a past event which explains how she learned the language/to fly/to do anything well:
“That was unnecessary and pandering! What is this, the Prequels? We don’t need every detail of every character’s backstory spelled out!”

There’s just no pleasing some people.

Rey is a boring character to begin with, with practically no personality and only a flimsy attempt at mystery to her backstory giving the audience any reason to give her a second thought. She shows up, saves the day, but doesn’t give us any reason to care about her besides that. She’s not a badass like Han Solo, she doesn’t (yet) have an intriguing backstory (since they hid all of it until the sequel). People seem to figure she’s closest to giving us a hero’s journey story, like Luke did, but her journey to hero felt much less earned than Luke’s. The comparison’s are obvious, since they’re both young people from desert planets who head into space with elderly mentors who teach them how to battle the empire before getting killed by a guy in a black mask with a funny voice. But is anyone going to sit here and tell me Rey’s story is as well done as Luke’s? She effectively fills his role in the movie, but doesn’t do it as well.

In the original Star Wars, Luke was the nothing farm boy who became a top fighter pilot and destroyed the Death Star, becoming a hero.

Rey starts off more skilled due to a rougher life requiring more self-dependence and, at the end of the film, is still on the road to hero-hood (to be continued in later films). The destruction of Starkiller Base is more a team effort, though her contribution to this is roughly comparable to C3PO’s contribution to the destruction of the Death Star.

I’m with John King- I think anyone (and there are many, though not a majority) who complain about “they didn’t explain enough about x, y, and z in the Force Awakens” can’t really have been any sort of Star Wars fan until long after the movies came out. Not only was there stuff in the original movies they didn’t explain till later movies, there was all sorts of stuff they NEVER explained, until there was expanded universe stuff and prequels. Darth Vader was the Dark Lord of the Sith. What the heck was that? We made up all sorts of fan theories, and there were articles in fanzines speculating. But he’s not even really called that in the movies, and they certainly don’t tell us what a Sith might be (until Phantom Menace in official continuity). The whole structure of the galaxy, the senate being ended, and that there was an “emperor” is a throw away line in a Death Star scene. They don’t explain hardly anything. It’s deepens that it’s a world that already exists, not one that needs to be explained away.

And I like ‘em both, but Luke was a whiny kid who “seemed strong with the Force” so he could do these things. There wasn’t any explanation at all why he was or what it meant. Rey has a personality; it just doesn’t have an “edge.” She’s earnest, charming, unsure of herself in thought, but capable in action. One of JJ’s major successes of the films (and his work) is that he found leads who were immediately likable on screen, or convincing at least, as with Kylo Ren. That was one of the weaknesses of the prequels…who do the films get you to root for, even if you’re supposed to? Can you imagine Driver as Anakin? Now do I think the character was a big stretch for Daisy Ridley? No, it’s not the hardest acting work. Because I think she is that likable and charming. It’s more a movie star turn. I mean, Harrison Ford isn’t really stretching by playing Han Solo, but damn if he isn’t awesome. And that’s what I want, it’s Star Wars; characters who are awesome to guide me on this thrill ride. Rey and Finn did that for me.

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