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CSBG Archive

Comic Book Legends Revealed #565

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Welcome to the five hundred and sixty-fifth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the first five hundred (I actually haven’t been able to update it in a while). This week, which original Image series began life as an X-Men spinoff? Did Kevin Conroy take up smoking to make his Bruce Wayne voice sound old in Batman Beyond? And what was Aquaman’s REAL first comic book cover appearance?

Let’s begin!

NOTE: The column is on three pages, a page for each legend. There’s a little “next” button on the top of the page and the bottom of the page to take you to the next page (and you can navigate between each page by just clicking on the little 1, 2 and 3 on the top and the bottom, as well).

COMIC LEGEND: Cyberforce began life as a spinoff of the X-Men.

STATUS: True

One of the great odd little quirks of history is that a good deal of the negotiations for what would eventually become the formation of Image Comics occurred at a Marvel conference. You know, those things where they fly out the various writers of a group of comics to discuss future plans. This 1991 conference was an X-Men related conference. A good chunk of what would become the original Image Comics had already formed at this point, perhaps most notably Rob Liefeld and Todd McFarlane, but it was at this conference that they landed Jim Lee, Marc Silvestri and Whilce Portacio.

However, in another one of life’s funny coincidences, Marc Silvestri was ready to propose at that conference an idea that would eventually become his first Image series, Cyberforce.

cyberforce

Only he was going to propose it as an X-Men spin-off!

In a wonderful interview with TJ Dietsch right here at CBR a few years back, Silvestri detailed his mindset at the time and how it all went down:

At that point in my life, I’d reached the pinnacle. I’d worked on “X-Men,”

silvestrixmen

I’d worked with Chris Claremont, and beyond the X-Men, there was “Wolverine,” which was great because I loved working with Larry Hama.

silvestriwolverine

Twenty years ago, there wasn’t much else you could do beyond that. I didn’t really have much interest in any other characters, I wasn’t built for Spider-Man, I was crappy at Spider-Man, so I really didn’t know what to do and I was looking for something that was going to pull me into some new kind of creative direction. I didn’t see that in comics at that point.

For me, the idea of creator ownership was in the stratosphere, it wasn’t going to happen. Frank Miller, who at that point was already wildly famous with “Dark Knight Returns” and even “Ronin,” was getting a lot of eyeballs. That wasn’t me at that time, so I didn’t consider that an option. For me, the timing was perfect, I needed something to keep me in comics and to keep me creative. Ironically, I went over to New York for the big X-book meeting. Bob Harras was the editor-in-chief who pulled us all together. Rob Liefeld was there, Peter David was there and we were in a conference room talking about the direction of the X-Men books. In that room I was pitching the idea of Cyber Force to Bob Harras as a spinoff book of the X-Men, which accounts for a lot of the similarities Cyber Force had in the early days with the X-Men. I wanted my own book, Jim Lee had just had success with “X-Men” #1 and spinoffs were going all over the place. I’d pitched a spinoff of “Wolverine,” and that didn’t go anywhere because they were doing something with Weapon X. Rob would later tell me that he wanted to kick me under the table because he already knew about Image Comics and was thinking, “No, no, no, don’t tell them. Save this. This would be great for Image.”

Fascinating how these things happen.

By the way, that sure does put the whole Cyblade/Psylocke thing into perspective, huh?

cyblade1

psylockejlee

Thanks to TJ Dietsch and Marc Silvestri for the info!

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Check out some recent entertainment and sports legends from Legends Revealed:

Did Marlon Brando Urinate Onstage to Upstage Another Actor?

Did a Movie Studio Spread Rumors About Their Own Star’s Death For Publicity?

Did FIFA Change the Rules of a Contest When Diego Maradona Was Voted Player of the Century?

Did How I Met Your Mother Create An Actual Canadian Sex Acts Website?

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

On the next page, did Kevin Conroy take up smoking to make Bruce Wayne sound older on Batman Beyond?

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68 Comments

You’re legend about Cyberforce reminds me of a legend I’ve heard about some other early Image books that I e-mailed you about many moons ago. I’ll have to look it up again and re-send it…

Cyber Force X-Men? Ah what could have been. Mmmm.
I would probably like it.
But then again, I guess that all of you would probably hate it with your guts, right? :)

On the Cyblade/Psylocke connection, it seems clear that Impact was Colossus and Heatwave was Cyclops in whatever is original pitch was.

I don’t think it’s some kind of merit to see Aquaman appearing on a cover chewing a rope.

Also, what’s with the yellow gloves?

Everything about that last Colossal cover bewilders me.

Well, color me unsurprised by the Cyberforce legend. :) The WHOLE of early Image Comics was actually a spin-off of X-Men and X-Force. Except for the Ghost Rider/Spider-Man influence on Spawn. And Savage Dragon being sorta derivative of the Hulk initially. Mostly bad stuff copied from comics that were already not all that good.

Lierson – That is Golden Age Aquaman with the yellow gloves.

Yeah, what’s 5′. and 3’6 on the Australian covers? Is that how they signify the cost in Australian wampum?

Aquaman wore yellow gloves in the Golden Age. The first time I even learned that there had been a Golden Age Aquaman was back in the last issue of All-Star Squadron, where the effects of the Crisis were felt. Roy Thomas had him join the All-Stars just in time to be written out of continuity. And he was wearing yellow gloves, which I’m pretty sure Thomas mentioned in a letter page editorial (this is Roy Thomas we are talking about, after all).

How degrading must it be for Aquaman to have to sit in the back of a boat. His whole shtick is about being IN water…..

Damn, I LOVED Cyberforce. Then again Silvestri could have drawn anything and I’d have bought every issue.

@Rene
100% correct.

ALSO
Spawn – Spider-Man / Ghost Rider
Youngblood – Avengers / X-Men
Wild Cats – Avengers / X-Men
It’s funny, because Avengers weren’t that hot back in the time, but both Lee and Liefeld would return to do Heroes Reborn and whether someone likes it or not, they genuinely enjoyed these characters.

Shadowhawk – Spawn / Batman (yes. Shadowhawk was that unoriginal)
(also Valentino created his own GOTG rip-off, that also featured a typical weird letter by Patty Cockrum)

WetWorks – S.H.I.EL.D. vs vampires? This was actually cool to be honest
Liefeld’s Executioners (or whatever) ended up finally as Berserkers

Larsen also had Freak Force, which was based on Larsen’s pitch on X-Factor, that Mr. Cronin already covered!

Was Claremont 8th Image founder? He had a character Huntsman in the project that never became anything.
Huntsman appeared in both Cyber Force and Wild Cats, but apparently, because back then, artists were hot, and writers were not, then someone who was only writer, like Claremont, didn’t have chance of having a hot property. I would like a legend about that, and the whole case, but please, be thorough and before you feature, please try to collect as much info as possible, as there are many blanks in this legend!

(I changed e-mail this time, as the previous was for non-comic book purposes, and I was afraid that the eventual esponse from this blog would be treated as spam)

@MonikerNV: That’s old currency. Until the mid-60s, Australia used the Australian Pound which was divided into 20 shillings or 240 pence (pennies)–each shilling was comprised of 12 pence). While the usual abbreviations were s (for shilling) and d (for pence), the way they were listed in common sales fashion varied somewhat but that ‘ was probably just a shortened / . So, the 5′ means “5 shillings” and the 3’6 means “3 shillings and 6 pence” (the first would equal “60 pence” and the latter would equal “42 pence”–I’m not sure what their actual conversion rates to US currency would be but probably close to $0.56 and $0.39, if my math is correct; that’s based on a 1949 devaluation where 1 Australian pound equaled $2.24).

I found a Lego page with an advertisement featuring Lego sets for sale in Australia (before the decimalization change which led to the Australian Dollar). http://www.eurobricks.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=81428

The prices are mostly listed in the form of x/yd where x is the number of shillings, and y is the number of pence; the d is the abbreviation for pence here; there’s one price (£10/10/3, meaning 10 pounds, 10 shillings, 3 pence) showing the pounds which omits the d. Since there were 1- and 2-shilling coins minted, it was often as easy to just list shillings (even when they exceeded the 20 in a pound) since kids could pretty easily collect a bunch of shillings (though I imagine merchants weren’t so happy to see a kid come in with 138 shillings in coins rather than 7 £1 notes–138 shillings would be 6 pounds and 18 shillings).

Even back then it was blatantly obvious that cyberforces cast were rip offs of cyclops, colossus, psylocke,wolverine, and cable.

Is that Starro character a pun on Captain Americas shield? There must be a connection: one is a red-and-white striped circular thing with a silver star in the middle and the other is a silver star with a red-and-white circular thing in the middle.

Australia is girt by sea. Couldn’t get rid of Aquaman if you wanted to!

Aquaman is Caucasian, blond and practically lives in the ocean – a perfect fit for the White Australia policy. It was being officially ‘dismantled’ post-WII but he’s still definitely the kind of import they would have preferred then. Now too, I suspect…

It’s painful how unoriginal most of that Image stuff was…and how big it all was at the time too. Maybe artists shouldn’t automatically be writers. How many of them are still published? Spawn and Savage Dragon? Even they don’t really matter much anymore, do they?

The greatest crime in animation history will probably go down as making The Dark Knight Returns into a cartoon and not using Conroy as the voice. Like he couldn’t do old Batman. *slaps head*

And that last Colossal Comic Annual cover is all sorts of disturbing. At least Aquaman can get “hooked”…what’s Robin’s excuse? And Grum, maybe Aquaman is’t in the boat in the second one…Robin seems to be riding on the back of the hull, and Aquaman is standing so far to the side it’s like he’s not even in the boat. Maybe he’s just running along side on top of the water. Hmmmm….maybe not less degrading. But for him to be in the boat he has to be uncomfortably close behind Batman.

On the “Justice League” debut cover, what exactly is Wonder Woman doing with her lasso? It seems to go from her hands and connect with… nothing.

@Inner Circle:

I dunno. At the time Starro was introduced, Captain America had been out of print for seven years (or 10 years if you don’t count a very short-lived revival). That doesn’t seem like a long time now, but back then they really weren’t writing with any kind of collector fandom in mind and would routinely recycle plots from one issue to the next. After all, Jay Garrick’s JSA adventures had been discontinued only five years before Barry Allen was introduced.

Also, Golden Age Captain America’s shield had one red circle and one blue one. The multiple red circles was a Silver Age thing, introduced four years after Starro.

I dunno. At the time Starro was introduced, Captain America had been out of print for seven years (or 10 years if you don’t count a very short-lived revival). That doesn’t seem like a long time now, but back then they really weren’t writing with any kind of collector fandom in mind and would routinely recycle plots from one issue to the next.

Seven years was, in fact, coincidentally the rule of thumb for how often you could recycle the exact same plot, due to audience turnover.

M-Wolverine –

I don’t like it when they use the words “mass hysteria” to explain some past event that nowadays we find hard to believe, but in the case of the huge success of early Image Comics, I think the words are appropriate.

But a lot can be forgiven if you think that lots of the fans must have been pretty young, I guess. I can imagine guys younger than 13 really digging early Image Comics. I was about 20 when they started publishing here in Brazil, and I thought the books were all horrible.

@Benn: “On the “Justice League” debut cover, what exactly is Wonder Woman doing with her lasso? It seems to go from her hands and connect with… nothing.”

Hmmm… perhaps it entered a dimensional/temporal rift, and now we finally know the answer to “How did Reed get tied up on the cover to Fantastic Four #1?”

@ DC Sheehan

Australia’s “White Australia Policy” was dismantled over 40 years ago. We are, and still remain, one of the most multicultural countries in the world. Sure, we have a history of British immigration, but that makes sense in light of the fact we are still a Commonwealth country. However most of our immigration from the past 30 years has been, and continues to be from China and South East Asia.

And even though we have our own share of “public idiots” like Pauline Hanson who would like to revisit the distant past of immigration, most of us love the diverse range of cultures that enrich our land. That’s because we all come from a diverse range of cultures.

Haven’t heard anyone talking about building a wall in our country like the incredibly popular Donald Trump by the way…

Love the Batgirl costume story that you led us to. Given the fact that there was a XXX version of the 66 series on which the original costumers worked, there’s a special creepiness to Burt Ward’s “collection.”

ParanoidObsessive

March 4, 2016 at 3:10 pm

“By the way, that sure does put the whole Cyblade/Psylocke thing into perspective, huh?”

It’s funny, but before even opening this week’s article, just from reading the “Which original Image series began life as an X-Men spinoff?” question in the menu description blurb, Cyberforce leapt pretty much directly to mind, and the whole “Well, Cyblade is blatantly Psylocke” angle was probably like 90% of it. Ripclaw-as-Wolverine was probably the other 10%.

Granted, as other people have mentioned, a LOT of early Image characters just felt like thinly-veiled rip-offs of existing characters (especially in Rob Liefeld produced books), but for some reason it always stood out a bit more for me in Cyberforce. Maybe because Silvestri was one of the few original Image founders whose art I actually LIKED (meaning I was more inclined to pay attention to/buy his stuff, while I just sort of dismissed stuff like Youngblood and Bloodstrike out of hand as being purely ridiculous).

Ironically, thinking back, it almost feels like it might have worked better as a Marvel property with established Marvel characters and set in that universe (and not held back by the occasional cross-over with other, more disorganized or chaotic Image creators’ titles).

“But a lot can be forgiven if you think that lots of the fans must have been pretty young, I guess. I can imagine guys younger than 13 really digging early Image Comics.”

I was actually 14-15 around the time Image came out, and I thought most of what Image was putting out was terrible (both art AND writing, but I always felt I was in the minority at the time when it came to hating the art). That, combined with the drop-off in quality Marvel seemed to be having around the same time led me to jump ship and spend most of my money on Dark Horse and Valiant (which, sadly, started its own decline after Jim Shooter got ousted) instead .

I feel like both Marvel and Image got their ships righted much later on (though Marvel feels like it’s floundering again), but those two being terrible, DC not looking much better, and Valiant’s slow, painful, lingering death in the 90s played a huge role in my getting out of comics almost entirely for more than a decade.

Love the Batgirl costume story that you led us to. Given the fact that there was a XXX version of the 66 series on which the original costumers worked, there’s a special creepiness to Burt Ward’s “collection.”

Ha! There really is.

Ironically, thinking back, it almost feels like it might have worked better as a Marvel property with established Marvel characters and set in that universe (and not held back by the occasional cross-over with other, more disorganized or chaotic Image creators’ titles).

I think it is one of the few original Image properties that would have worked really, really well as part of Marvel. The other ones I think work better in their own universe and not a giant shared universe.

So the Aquaman question then becomes, which specific Australian cover was Aquaman’s cover debut?

Silvestri sure can draw. Twice better than Liefeld!

But that Cyberforce item reminded me of when Brian Wood did a mutant pitch for the Max imprint’s cattle call of 2001. That was bowdlerized by Marvel for NYX and maybe MUTIES, so Wood walked to do the real thing as DEMO, and the rest is history!

Surely there’s a Legend about it? Else http://wayback.archive.org/web/20060106062536/http://www.brianwood.com/demoproposal.html

As for that JLA cover, it shows the three white males attacking, while “the colored” and “the girl” are the useless ones captured by the beast. Classic stuff!

But another cover shows something much less typical: smiling Batman!

I always wanted to love CyberForce, but it needed a writer. If Silvestri and Claremont had spun it out of X-Men, it might have been awesome!

I was about 18 or so when Image was coming out. I remember trying each of the books and giving up. A lot of them had neat concepts that a good writer could have really run with, but most of the Image founders were definitely not writers. The only Image book I stuck with for long at all was Shadowhawk, and looking back I regret that a lot. It has not aged well.

Cyberforce started at as an okay concept that actually became a very good book late in its run under Brian Holguin and David Finch, then both unknowns.

That being said, I don’t see the automatic parallels between the characters and Marvel heroes. Cyblade probably was Psylocke, but I suspect Ripclaw was probably meant to be another Weapon X member and Heatwave wasn’t particularly Cyclops like outside of both having a dull personality. I strongly suspect Cyber Force would have been Weapon X related, as that was what Silvestri wanted, and he would have made most of these folks new characters with ties to the program (much as they all had a dark past with Cyberdata in the Image book).

I love Conroy’s Batman, but he’s not the best voice for every version of the character. Hearing him speak the meatheaded dialogue from the Arkham games just sounds wrong. Let the voice fit the flavor of the version.

Did someone mention doing crossovers at Image would be challenging? Sir I recomend you go read the entire series of Image United and come back to the comments section with an apology

John Trumbull

March 4, 2016 at 8:07 pm

“Is that Starro character a pun on Captain Americas shield? There must be a connection: one is a red-and-white striped circular thing with a silver star in the middle and the other is a silver star with a red-and-white circular thing in the middle.”

I doubt it. Starro’s appearance is generally theorized as coming from the 1956 science fiction movie WARNING FROM SPACE.

http://tinyurl.com/hltyvqg

http://www.triskaidekafiles.com/reviews/2015/6/13/warning-from-space-1956

I’d say the Captain America thing is more of a coincidence than anything.

That being said, I don’t see the automatic parallels between the characters and Marvel heroes. Cyblade probably was Psylocke, but I suspect Ripclaw was probably meant to be another Weapon X member and Heatwave wasn’t particularly Cyclops like outside of both having a dull personality.

Yeah, besides maaaaaaaaaaaybe Impact and Colossus, I think Cyblade was the only really notable “okay, that’s just Character X with a different name” character in Cyberforce.

Mike Haseloff and DC Sheehan: if all four superheroes were to try to arrive in Australia by speedboat today, they’d be picked up by a Border Force vessel well before reaching Australian waters, turned around, towed back into the middle of the Pacific or Indian Ocean and left to fend for themselves while the government denies all knowledge of the action. And this would all be done in order to protect them from the dangers of people smugglers!

Touche, Mark. Maybe one of these days Cronin can address the legend of Tony Abbott being a lizardman amphibioid in league with Ocean Master. Then again, anybody with eyes can probably see that legend is… true. #auspol

It was great to see Silvestri and the other Image founders go off on their own. Even if the books were only so-so, it was the independent nature of what they did that was so exciting.

It was great to see Silvestri and the other Image founders go off on their own. Even if the books were only so-so, it was the independent nature of what they did that was so exciting.

I remember when the Image books first came out, I was so impressed with their entrepreneurial spirit that I read pretty much all of them, even if, yeah, they weren’t all winners.

Yes, of course, the usual Image bashing by the even-back-in-the-day-overachievers, who loathed Image and instead devoured the intellectual Marvel and DC properties, which were so much better.:)

Eric L. Sofer, the Silver Age Fogey

March 5, 2016 at 6:05 am

Wonder Woman’s lasso is wrapped around Starro’s lower right tentacle. Granted, it’s not the best drawn element ever…

Ah, Image in the 90s. Metal, claws, and impossible anatomy. What do you call nostalgia when it makes you remember things you DIDN’T like?

And counting foreign issues of comics… Oh, Brian, you scalawag! :) :) :)

@DC Sheehan; Now too, I suspect…

Jamie’s pretty much said it all already, but nevertheless, how about avoiding saying ignorant comments about countries you aren’t a part of?

That brings back the 1990s memories! Such energy the Image people then emitted! Cyberforce vs. Wildcats! Two Wolverine-rip-offs fighting one another for a gal! Gorgeous women! In hindsight, Marc did the right thing. Without Marc, I believe we might not enjoy the works of Mike Turner, Francis Manapul, etc who were discovered personally by him.

dimo1 –

I wasn’t devouring Marvel at the time, because Marvel was even worse than Image. The early Image characters were cheap knockoffs of Marvel stuff, but Marvel pretty soon started to try and copy Image Comics too. Marvel devolved into a bad copy of a bad copy. DC wasn’t really great either, except for Vertigo.

And I only loathed early Image. When they got guys like Kurt Busiek, Alan Moore, and Warren Ellis I was there buying those books. But when they were on their own they definitely proved that comics need writers.

And counting foreign issues of comics… Oh, Brian, you scalawag! :) :) :)

I’m not really counting them, in the sense that the original CBLR #12 (“Aquaman didn’t appear on a comic cover until JLA debuted”) I’m still keeping as “True,” ya know? But as a separate interesting piece of information, the fact that he appeared on comic covers in Australia before he did in the States is still fascinating to me.

Wondering why my comment got moderated, can’t one poke fun at the chauvinism of an old comic cover?

It’s moderated while I address the legend you suggested in the comment.

I have to admit that I find the Kevin Conroy one slightly ridiculous. This is the man who has better than any other actor nailed the difference vocally between Bruce Wayne and Batman and people think he has to resort to tricks to get a deeper register for Get-Off-My-Lawn-man?

As Timm notes, though, there are respected voice actors who do do just that. So I imagine that’s how the rumor started.

Once, reading an entirely different article on this site (something about Australian cover prices, iirc), I noticed a strange trend that I’ve been meaning to ask about…
Just how many regular commentors on this site live in Australia? There seem to be a lot (or a least a LOT who’ve been to Australia).

… Then another article made me wonder how many are aged somewhere close to 40 years. My entirely unscientific surveying leads me to believe that 90% of the posters here are c40-year-old Australians. :)

@John Trumbull
“I doubt it. Starro’s appearance is generally theorized as coming from the 1956 science fiction movie WARNING FROM SPACE
http://www.triskaidekafiles.com/reviews/2015/6/13/warning-from-space-1956
Um… why is the banner pic on that page Freddy Krueger?
And why the Jackie Earle Hayley Freddy?
… just askin’.

Besides Cyberforce it seems like some other of the initial Image guys stuck to what they knew. You had Dale Keown doing Pitt, Liefeld and Lee doing team books with obvious analogues to the X-teams, even Sam Kieth followed up his Wolverine work with a character with claws. I also remember some ads for Spawn where the white around his eyes were shaped like Spider-Man’s instead of what we know now.

As for Silvestri, I loved his work on X-Men. It’s hard to say which era was “mine” because while Silvestri was the artist on Uncanny when I started reading, I was also reading recent back issues and Classic X-Men. So “my” X-Men artists are Byrne, JRJr, and Silvestri equally.

John Trumbull

March 5, 2016 at 7:56 pm

“Um… why is the banner pic on that page Freddy Krueger?
And why the Jackie Earle Hayley Freddy?
… just askin’.”

No idea. Not my page.

“No idea. Not my page.”

Fair enough. :)

I have noticed that there are a lot of Australian (is it ok to call you Aussies?) commenters here, as well, Le Messor. Which answers the question I had about you months back when you happened to go to a record show the same weekend I had, and at both shows, there were comics for sale. I assume you were not in upstate New York…

Since there are so many Aussie fans of the blog, we probably need some more Phantom features, no? Australians seem to love the Phantom, from what I’ve seen.

“Australians seem to love The Phantom”

Lee Falk was Australian, so there’s that…

My error :( Although the ’90s movie w/Billy Zane was filmed there :]

Alaric Shapli

March 6, 2016 at 2:34 pm

I knew Lee Falk (he wasn’t Australian). His daughter went to school with my mother. I knew his grandchildren growing up. (And, no, I’m not Australian, nor have I been there…) We used to go to Cape Cod in the summers, and we’d go to his tennis launches at his home (a wonderful house up a hill, called Xanadu… as you drove up, you’d pass a series of signs that told, in order, the first few lines of Coleridge’s poem, “Kubla Khan”.”)

Wikipedia says Falk was American.

I don’t think the Phantom is really big here in Brazil now, but popularity is a strange thing. Many folks from my parents’ generation didn’t know any DC hero except for Batman, Robin, and Superman, and probably no Marvel heroes except for The Hulk and Spider-Man, but they knew everything about the Phantom and Mandrake. We probably had some pretty popular Phantom and Mandrake comics here in the 1950s or 1960s. Far more popular than Marvel/DC.

Touch-and-Go Bullethead

March 6, 2016 at 4:29 pm

I would assume the reason Aquaman was included on these covers was something like this: Superman, Batman, and Robin were the most popular characters, so of course they would be featured on the covers. You would want someone else with them, to demonstrate that this is a special collection with a lot of characters, and not just another issue of WORLD’S FINEST. Aquaman, being also a superhero, is more logically teamed with them than Hopalong Cassidy or Rex the Wonder Dog (though not more logically than Wonder Woman–I cannot guess why she was omitted, unless someone thought putting her in a boat with the guys was a little too suggestive of a foursome).

The other characters on that first cover, if anyone is wondering, are Silent Knight and Robin Hood from THE BRAVE AND THE BOLD, and Johnny Thunder from ALL-STAR WESTERN.

WARNING FROM SPACE wasn’t released in the USA until 1967, so how could it have inspired Starro? Japanese films weren’t readily available in the USA at that time unless they were released theatrically (which was usually a few years after the Japanese release).

“Haven’t heard anyone talking about building a wall in our country like the incredibly popular Donald Trump by the way…”

(Checks to see if Australia is still surrounded by water…)

M-Wolverine –

Maybe it’s a magical wall of water surrounding Australia, like in Peter Weir’s THE LAST WAVE.

Not a regular commentor, but a comment now and then…

And I’m an Australia around 40.

Aussie and around 40 here!

Yes the Phantom was “huge” here. Now not so much. And no I never thought it was Australian nor that Lee Falk was.

Travis –
“I have noticed that there are a lot of Australian (is it ok to call you Aussies?) commenters here…”

I’ve never known us to mind. (I don’t know why I missed your reply for so long, sorry.)

P.S.
“you happened to go to a record show the same weekend I had, and at both shows, there were comics for sale. I assume you were not in upstate New York…”

Nope, never been to New York.
But I admit I’m a little flattered anyone remembered me well enough to connect those two posts! :)

Me too: born in Australia and lived here my whole 50 years. No-one here seriously claims Lee Falk and the Phantom as Aussie, we reserve that for New Zealanders (but only the successful ones).

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