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Brian Cronin, Author at Comics Should Be Good! @ Comic Book Resources

Comic Book Six Degrees – Jack Kirby to Will Eisner

As suggested by Jenos Idanian #13, the idea behind this game is to connect two comic creators to each other through artists/writers that they have jointly worked together with, in as few links as possible.

For instance, take connecting John Byrne and John Buscema.

Byrne drew Captain America with writer Roger Stern
Roger Stern wrote Avengers with artist John Buscema.

That’s a simple one, but presumably there are more difficult ones out there.

I’ll try to keep the ground rules brief.
1. We’re only using writers and pencilers for this game. No offense to inkers, colorists and letterers, but it makes this too easy if we count them.
2. Plotting counts as writing and breakdowns/layouts count for penciling. Finishes SHOULD count, but I’m not counting them for the same basic reason of #1.
3. Alterations by another penciler don’t count as a connection to the first penciler. Basically, you’re never going to connect an artist with another artist. You can connect writers with each other, though, if they co-wrote (or plotted/scripted) a story. And obviously if an artist wrote a story, you can connect an artist with another artist in that fashion (like John Byrne can connect with Jerry Ordway from Byrne writing stories Ordway penciled).
4. Only comic book stories count. No pin-ups.
5. If a comic story contains multiple writers and artists, it’s up to you to prove that the given writer actually wrote the page in the comic that the artist drew.

Every installment, whoever connects the two creators in the least amount of turns gets to pick the next match (in the event of a tie, the winner is chosen randomly among the people who sent in challenges for the next match.

NOTE: When you folks send in your answers, please include your suggestion for the next match in the event that your answer is chosen. And demonstrate that it IS possible to connect your two suggested choices within six moves. Thanks!

Last week’s match-up was Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez to Kazuo Koike. Rob M. was one of about a half dozen people who was able to connect the two in three moves. He was the randomly selected winner among the six. Here is how he connected the two:

Kazuo Koike wrote and Paul Smith drew a story in X-Men Unlimited #50
Mike Baron wrote and Paul Smith drew Nexus #54 and others
Mike Baron wrote and Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez drew Nexus #30

Rob’s challenge is…

Jack Kirby to Will Eisner

E-mail me your answers at bcronin@comicbookresources.com. Do NOT post your answers in the comments section!

Whoever connects the two characters in the least amount of creators gets to pick the connection for next time around (I’ll pick a random winner in the event of a tie)!

Remember to Forget – That Time That Batman Wet His Pants

In this series we spotlight comic book stories that are likely best left forgotten. Here is an archive of past installments.

Today we look at the disappointing conclusion to the Batman mini-series, The Widening Gyre…
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Comic Book Questions Answered – What, Exactly, Is Captain America’s Shield Made Out Of?

Comic Book Questions Answered – where I answer whatever questions you folks might have about comic books (feel free to e-mail questions to me at bcronin@comicbookresources.com). Here is a link to an archive of all the past questions that have been answered so far.

Reader Elisabeth D. wrote in to ask:

I’ve seen some sources state that Cap’s shield is an alloy of vibranium and steel and others say it’s an alloy of vibranium and adamantium. Which is correct? Has it changed over time?

Read on for the answer, Elisabeth!
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The Wrong Side: Catwoman vs. Prometheus

In this feature, I examine comic book fights that were particularly notable in the wrong side winning (or at least that the fight wasn’t won the “right” way). This really isn’t a big deal, of course, as it doesn’t really matter if the “wrong” person won a fight. But it’s fun to talk about!

If you want to suggest a fight for future inclusion in this feature, drop me a line at bcronin@comicbookresources.com. Don’t suggest a fight in the comments!

This week, oddly enough, we feature the fight that I got the most suggestions for. It’s honestly not one that would normally occur to me, but hey, if enough of you want to see it, I’ll feature it! So here is Catwoman’s whipping of Prometheus…
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The Past Was Close Behind: “We’ll Never Forget You Supergirl…Until We All Forget You Right Away.”

This feature spotlights moments, exchanges, etc. from older comics that take on a brand new light when read in concert with later comic books. Here is the archive of previous installments.

Based on a suggestion by reader Austin B., we take a look at everyone talking about how they will never forget Supergirl and her sacrifice in Crisis on Infinite Earths #7 (by Marv Wolfman, George Perez and Jerry Ordway)…
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Top Five Best Superhero Origins

Here is an archive of all the past top five lists I’ve one over the years.

The best superhero origins become almost icons themselves. You can identify them with very little information. Here are what I think are the top five best ones…
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Comic Book Legends Revealed #529

Welcome to the five hundred and twenty-ninth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the first five hundred (I actually haven’t been able to update it in a while). This week, did the screenplay for never-produced Superman V become Superman: The Earth Stealers? Did Kurt Busiek almost have a series at DC Comics that ended up being hurt by Busiek getting TOO good of an artist for the series? And finally, did Steve Englehart take a West Coast Avengers story and make it a Fantastic Four story instead?

Let’s begin!
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The Line it is Drawn #246 – Superhero Fight Club!

Welcome to our weekly gallery of amazing art by our great collection of artistic talent, all working from YOUR suggestions!

Go follow Comics Should Be Good on Twitter (if you have Twitter, that is – if you don’t, you can go sign up). Here is our Twitter page… http://twitter.com/csbg. And here are the Comics Should Be Good writers who are on Twitter (the links go to the person’s Twitter account) – myself, Greg Hatcher, Chad Nevett, Kelly Thompson, Bill Reed, Greg Burgas and Sonia Harris

I update the blog’s Twitter account updates whenever a new post is put up on the blog, so it’s an easy way to keep up with the blog. In addition, I post new content on the blog’s Twitter account.

Now on to the bit!

So every week, I ask a question here. You reply to it on our Twitter page (just write @csbg with your reply) and our artists will each pick one of your suggestions and I will post their drawings based on your suggestions here every week. So every week you will have a new question and you will see the choices picked from the previous week. Here is an archive of all the previous editions of The Line It Is Drawn!

To qualify, you have to be following us when you reply – so go follow us and then give your answer to the following question/challenge (All suggestions due by 3pm Pacific Friday).

The topic is…

Name a comic book character and our artists will draw a modern day Hostess Pie ad for them!

Read on for the drawings that came about courtesy of the last question/challenge!

Comic book fight club! Pick any two comic book characters and our artists will draw them fighting. Superman vs. Scott Pilgrim. Calvin and Hobbes vs. Kick Ass and Hit-Girl. And so on and so forth.

Enjoy!
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I Love Ya But You’re Strange – That Time Jimmy Olsen Had to Make Superman Cry to Gain Super Powers

Every installment of I Love Ya But You’re Strange I spotlight strange but ultimately endearing comic stories. Here is the archive of all the installments of this feature. Feel free to e-mail me at bcronin@comicbookresources.com if you have a suggestion for a future installment!

Today we look at the time Jimmy Olsen needed Superman to cry for Jimmy to gain some super powers…
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Comic Book Easter Eggs – Realistic Versions of Saturday Morning Cartoons!

In this feature, I share with you comic book “easter eggs.” An easter egg is a joke/visual gag/in-joke that a comic book creator (typically the artist) has hidden in the pages of the comic for readers to find (just like an easter egg). They range from the not-so-obscure to the really obscure. So come check ‘em all out and enjoy! Also, click here for an archive of all the easter eggs featured so far! If you want to suggest an easter egg for a future column, e-mail me at bcronin@comicbookresources.com (do not post your suggestion in the comments section!).

Today we look at a bunch of Saturday morning cartoon characters making cameos in comics in more “realistic” versions, most notably by John Byrne in a special issue of Sensational She-Hulk!
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The Great Comic Book Cover Homage Streak: Week 143

It occurs to me that it seems like many comic book covers are homages. Which is fine with me. I have no problem with it. It just made me think, though, how long could I go before I hit a week where NO new comic book was released that had a cover that was an homage to something? Let’s find out! Here is an archive of all the cover homages featured in the streak so far!

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Comic Theme Time – What’s the Weirdest Origin for a Character’s Name?

Comic Theme Time is a twist on the idea of a “Top Five” list. Instead of me stating a topic and then listing my top five choices in that topic, I’m giving you the topic and letting you go wild with examples that you think fit the theme.

Today, I did a Music Legends Revealed about the unlikely source of the name Mony in the hit song, “Mony Mony.” This made me think about comic book names and some of the odd origins some names have, like the Atom being named after a science fiction editor who was also a little person named Ray Palmer or the Rainbow Raider being named after the mnemonic device for remembering the colors of the rainbow (ROY G BIV – Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Indigo and Violet).

What other good examples can you think of?

The Wrong Side: Spider-Man vs. Graviton

In this feature, I examine comic book fights that were particularly notable in the wrong side winning (or at least that the fight wasn’t won the “right” way). This really isn’t a big deal, of course, as it doesn’t really matter if the “wrong” person won a fight. But it’s fun to talk about!

If you want to suggest a fight for future inclusion in this feature, drop me a line at bcronin@comicbookresources.com. Don’t suggest a fight in the comments!

This week, based on a suggestion by reader Michael F., we look at the time that Spider-Man one-punched a guy who took on an entire team of Avengers…
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When We First Met – When Did Bruce Wayne Become a BILLIONAIRE Playboy?

In this feature we spotlight the various characters, phrases, objects or events that eventually became notable parts of comic lore, like the first time someone said, “Avengers Assemble!” or the first appearance of Batman’s giant penny or the first appearance of Alfred Pennyworth or the first time Spider-Man’s face was shown half-Spidey/half-Peter. Stuff like that. Here is an archive of all the When We First Met features so far! Check ‘em out!

Readers Alex J. and Tim H. both e-mailed me the same question recently, namely when did Bruce Wayne move from MILLIONAIRE to BILLIONAIRE? I figured I’d just go through all of those debuts (millionaire, billionaire and even the first time he was referred to as a playboy)!
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The Abandoned An’ Forsaked – The Beyonder is a Cosmic Cube! No, Wait, He’s an Inhuman! No, Wait…

In this feature we examine comic book stories and ideas that were not only abandoned, but also had the stories/plots specifically “overturned” by a later writer (as if they were a legal precedent). Click here for an archive of all the previous editions of The Abandoned An’ Forsaked. Feel free to e-mail me at bcronin@comicbookresources.com if you have any suggestions for future editions of this feature.

Today, based on a suggestion by a few different readers (the last two I saw were Joe D. and percane), we look at the Beyonder’s history with retcons…
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