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Month of African-American Comics Archives | Comics Should Be Good @ CBR

Women in Comics NYC Collective International: Black Women in Comics Spotlights – Darlena Marie

Since I’m doing a Black Creators countdown this month, I didn’t have time to do spotlights on black-created comics like I normally like to do in February. Instead, though, I asked the nifty comic book writer Regine L. Sawyer to do some spotlights on fellow black women members of her Women In Comics NYC Collective. Enjoy! – BC

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Darlena Marie is a Military Veteran turned Professional Cosplayer. She has been a Costumed Performer for 6 years and a Professional Costumer for over 10. Since elementary school, Darlena had always been involved in performing in school plays, which lead to community theatre as she got older. Wearing costumes was a fun avenue to express creativity and fantasy for her. In terms of Cosplay, Darlena’s beginnings started out with Star Trek, (she’s a huge Trekkie!) and Renaissance Fairs; it soon branched off into steam-punk and comic book characters.
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Women in Comics NYC Collective International: Black Women in Comics Spotlights – Dr. Deborah E. Whaley

Since I’m doing a Black Creators countdown this month, I didn’t have time to do spotlights on black-created comics like I normally like to do in February. Instead, though, I asked the nifty comic book writer Regine L. Sawyer to do some spotlights on fellow black women members of her Women In Comics NYC Collective. Enjoy! – BC

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Deborah Elizabeth Whaley is an artist, curator, writer, and Associate Professor of American Studies and African American Studies at the University of Iowa. She grew up reading and drawing comics; later on in life she started formal training in Cartooning. Presently, Deborah works in the mediums of acrylic, mixed-media, oil, and sometimes in watercolor. Whaley is now experimenting with silhouette and led lights, which creates a dynamic effect of luminosity and depth.
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Women in Comics NYC Collective International: Black Women in Comics Spotlights – Pamela Thomas

Since I’m doing a Black Creators countdown this month, I didn’t have time to do spotlights on black-created comics like I normally like to do in February. Instead, though, I asked the nifty comic book writer Regine L. Sawyer to do some spotlights on fellow black women members of her Women In Comics NYC Collective. Enjoy! – BC

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Pamela Thomas is the Co-Owner and Co-Curator of the Museum Of UnCut Funk (museumofuncutfunk.com), an avid collector of Black memorabilia and an expert on 1970’s Black culture.Over the past eighteen years, Pamela has pursued her passion for Black history by building an extensive collection of Black culture artifacts, which includes: Animation Art And Collectibles, Broadway Window Cards, Coins, Comic Books, Movie Posters, Stamps, and Sports items that reflect Black images. The collection has been covered by: BET, NY-1, WNBC- NY, WABC-NY, WABC-Chicago; in Essence, Inside New Jersey, Intelligent Collector, More, Savoy, Upscale, New York Times, USA Today; and online by Complex, Ebony, Fast Company Design, NPR, The Source, and Collector’s Quest. Images from the collection are currently being featured as a part of the Google Cultural Institute Art Project, which launched as a part of their #BlackHistoryMonth project on February 1, 2016.

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Women in Comics NYC Collective International: Black Women in Comics Spotlights – Y. Sanders

Since I’m doing a Black Creators countdown this month, I didn’t have time to do spotlights on black-created comics like I normally like to do in February. Instead, though, I asked the nifty comic book writer Regine L. Sawyer to do some spotlights on fellow black women members of her Women In Comics NYC Collective. Enjoy! – BC

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Born from the cradles of Queens, NY, Y. Sanders was seven when her mother introduced her to the world of comics. Having found her life’s purpose as a comic artist, her path lead her to attend LaGuardia High School of Arts and later majored in illustration and graphic design at The School of Visual Arts. In addition to her professional work in comics, she continues to strive in improving her already incomparable talents at ‘The Art Students League of New York’.

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Women in Comics NYC Collective International: Black Women in Comics Spotlights – Dr. Sheena C. Howard

Since I’m doing a Black Creators countdown this month, I didn’t have time to do spotlights on black-created comics like I normally like to do in February. Instead, though, I asked the nifty comic book writer Regine L. Sawyer to do some spotlights on fellow black women members of her Women In Comics NYC Collective. Enjoy! – BC

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Dr. Sheena C. Howard is the Immediate Past Chair of the Black Caucus (NCA) and Associate Professor of Communication at Rider University. In 2014, she entered the Comic Book Industry in a way that every seasoned professional dreams about; Her first book, a collection of essays, titled ‘Black Comics: Politics of Race & Representations’ broke barriers that year by not only winning an Eisner Award, (which is the equivalent of the ‘Oscars’ in Comics), but making her the first Black Woman to ever receive that honor in its 28 year history.

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Women in Comics NYC Collective International: Black Women in Comics Spotlights – Whit Taylor

Since I’m doing a Black Creators countdown this month, I didn’t have time to do spotlights on black-created comics like I normally like to do in February. Instead, though, I asked the nifty comic book writer Regine L. Sawyer to do some spotlights on fellow black women members of her Women In Comics NYC Collective. Enjoy! – BC

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Whit Taylor is a Cartoonist, Writer and Editor- based in New York City, bred in New Jersey. Initially a Film Maker and future Documentarian, she began creating comics professionally over five years ago after visiting various small press conventions and shows. An avid lover and maker of comics and cartoons; Whit turned her lifelong hobby into an ever flourishing career. Her work is vast, thoughtful and varied; discussing topics such as mental health and race to candid memoirs and autobiographical reflections.
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Women in Comics NYC Collective International: Black Women in Comics Spotlights – Maia ‘Crown’ Williams

Since I’m doing a Black Creators countdown this month, I didn’t have time to do spotlights on black-created comics like I normally like to do in February. Instead, though, I asked the nifty comic book writer Regine L. Sawyer to do some spotlights on fellow black women members of her Women In Comics NYC Collective. Enjoy! – BC

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Maia Williams, also known as “Crown”, is CEO/Founder of MECCAcon, an annual multi ethnic comic con and international film festival in Detroit, MI. This will be the convention’s third year, and the film fest’s second. She is an experienced showrunner and organizer of over 6 years; with multiple comic conventions under her belt, she has worked on multiple comic book conventions with other organizations.
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Women in Comics NYC Collective International: Black Women in Comics Spotlights – Micheline Hess

Since I’m doing a Black Creators countdown this month, I didn’t have time to do spotlights on black-created comics like I normally like to do in February. Instead, though, I asked the nifty comic book writer Regine L. Sawyer to do some spotlights on fellow black women members of her Women In Comics NYC Collective. This is the first one! – BC

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Born and raised in New York City, Micheline Hess started her professional comic book career in the early 90s with Milestone Comics as a colorist; working on such books as ‘Static Shock’ and ‘Icon’. Working for the groundbreaking company, inspired her to take her own concepts and comic book storytelling to the next level. She has several creator owned works such as the fantasy-adventure comic, book series ‘Malice in Ovenland’, (Published by Rosarium Publishing), ‘The Anansi Kids and the All Saints’ Day Adventure’, and the children’s book ‘The Island Cats of Cunga Ree.
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Month of African-American Comics: Eating Vampires #1

All this month I’ll be reviewing different comic books by African-American creators, based on submissions from the actual creators of the comic books themselves. Check out the archive to see what books have been spotlighted so far.

I technically am finishing the month with Eating Vampires #1 by Regine Sawyer (writer) and Delia Gable (artist), but since it always irks me about Black History Month being so short, I’ll be doing three bonus spotlights the next three days. But this is the “official” end of the month, since it is, you know, the actual end of the month.

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Month of African-American Comics: Hardears #1

All this month I’ll be reviewing different comic books by African-American creators, based on submissions from the actual creators of the comic books themselves. Check out the archive to see what books have been spotlighted so far.

Next up is Hardears #1 by Nigel Lynch (writer) and Matthew Clarke (artist)…

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Month of African-American Comics: E.P.I.C. #2

All this month I’ll be reviewing different comic books by African-American creators, based on submissions from the actual creators of the comic books themselves. Check out the archive to see what books have been spotlighted so far.

Next up is E.P.I.C. (Earth’s Protector in Crisis) #2 by Lonnie Lowe Jr. (writer), J.C. Grande (artist, pp 1-20) and Chuck Taylor (artist, pp 21-24)…

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Month of African-American Comics: Heroes of the World – Legend of the Earth Conduit #1

All this month I’ll be reviewing different comic books by African-American creators, based on submissions from the actual creators of the comic books themselves. Check out the archive to see what books have been spotlighted so far.

Next up is Heroes of the World – Legend of the Earth Conduit #1 from Vincent M. Galvez (writer), Joe Bonsu (artist) and Mark Williams (colorist)…

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Month of African-American Comics: Ajala – A Series of Adventures, Books 1-3

All this month I’ll be reviewing different comic books by African-American creators, based on submissions from the actual creators of the comic books themselves. Check out the archive to see what books have been spotlighted so far.

Next up today is Ajala: A series of Adventures by Robert Garrett (co-creatorwriter), N. Steven Harris (co-creator/penciler) and Walt Msonza Barna

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Month of African-American Comics: The Zoo Act

All this month I’ll be reviewing different comic books by African-American creators, based on submissions from the actual creators of the comic books themselves. Check out the archive to see what books have been spotlighted so far.

I’m awfully sorry, I was traveling the last few days with my wife visiting her sister and our nephew (it is amazing how good video games are nowadays – this new Disney Infinity 2.0 is nuts – kids have it good!) and with the timeline change and a seven-year-old waking us up every day at 6am, I didn’t have enough time to get these reviews done. But I’ll catch up right now (I’m actually writing this on a plane – hooray for airplane WiFi!).

First up is Myron Macklin’s graphic novel, The Zoo Act.

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Month of African-American Comics: Mythallica Lux Nova Volume 1

All this month I’ll be reviewing different comic books by African-American creators, based on submissions from the actual creators of the comic books themselves. Check out the archive to see what books have been spotlighted so far.

Today we look at the first volume of Mythallica Lux Nova by Mikhail Sebastian (creator/writer/artist)…

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