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Comic Book Legends Revealed #493

Welcome to the four hundred and ninety-second in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the previous four hundred and ninety-one. This week, in commemoration of the Death of Wolverine this week, it’s an all-Wolverine legends week! Did Wolverine not have healing powers for the first five years of his existence? Did an added in “snikt” turn Wolverine into a killer before Chris Claremont wanted him to? Finally, how close did the Fang costume for Wolverine come to being his actual costume?

Let’s begin!

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The Line it is Drawn #211 – What If Famous Crossovers Happened at Different Comic Book Companies?

Welcome to our weekly gallery of amazing art by our great collection of artistic talent, all working from YOUR suggestions!

Go follow Comics Should Be Good on Twitter (if you have Twitter, that is – if you don’t, you can go sign up). Here is our Twitter page… http://twitter.com/csbg. And here are the Comics Should Be Good writers who are on Twitter (the links go to the person’s Twitter account) – myself, Greg Hatcher, Chad Nevett, Kelly Thompson, Bill Reed, Greg Burgas, Sonia Harris, Melissa K. and Ken H.

I update the blog’s Twitter account updates whenever a new post is put up on the blog, so it’s an easy way to keep up with the blog. In addition, I post new content on the blog’s Twitter account.

Now on to the bit!

So every week, I ask a question here. You reply to it on our Twitter page (just write @csbg with your reply) and our blog sketch artists will each pick one of your suggestions and I will post them here every week. So every week you will have a new question and you will see the choices picked from the previous week. Here is an archive of all the previous editions of The Line It Is Drawn!

To qualify, you have to be following us when you reply – so go follow us and then give your answer to the following question/challenge (All suggestions due by 3pm Pacific Friday).

The topic is…

It’s True Comic Book Detective time! Pick a solo comic book character and then come up with some sort of comic book-related case that you’d like to see them solve. Just a case title and our artists will figure out the rest. For instance, “Hawkeye and the Case of the Faulty Quinjet” or “Spider-Man and the Case of the Vanishing Wife.” So your tweet should be in the format of “(Name of Superhero) and the Case of (Whatever you Want the Case to Be)”

Read on for the sketches that came about courtesy of the last question/challenge!

As suggested by Twitter user LuisJaimePena, Comic Book Crossovers with different company’s characters instead. You know, Infinity Gauntlet with Darkseid and DC heroes, Secret Wars with the Valiant heroes. Stuff like that.

Enjoy!
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Year of the Artist, Day 289: Joe Quesada, Part 1 – Spelljammer #8

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Joe Quesada, and the issue is Spelljammer #8, which was published by DC and is cover dated April 1991. Enjoy!
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The Abandoned An’ Forsaked – Did Arcade Light a Match on Doctor Doom’s Armor or What?

In this feature we examine comic book stories and ideas that were not only abandoned, but also had the stories/plots specifically “overturned” by a later writer (as if they were a legal precedent). Click here for an archive of all the previous editions of The Abandoned An’ Forsaked. Feel free to e-mail me at bcronin@comicbookresources.com if you have any suggestions for future editions of this feature.

Today, based on a suggestion by reader Richard C., we take a quick look at Doctor Doom and his ever-pervasive “Doom-bots.”
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Tea Party: Chapter 2, Page 4

Line it is Drawn artists Thea Sousa and her daughter Amanda are doing a new webcomic with writer Sam Machado. It is called Tea Party and it is about the earliest days of the American Revolution. Click here to read the first chapter/issue. Read on to read the fourth page of the second chapter/issue (every day this week I’ll feature another page from Chapter 2).
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Year of the Artist, Day 288: Greg Ruth, Part 4 – The Lost Boy

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Greg Ruth, and the comic is The Lost Boy, which was published by Scholastic and is cover dated September 2013. Enjoy!
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Tea Party: Chapter 2, Page 3

Line it is Drawn artists Thea Sousa and her daughter Amanda are doing a new webcomic with writer Sam Machado. It is called Tea Party and it is about the earliest days of the American Revolution. Click here to read the first chapter/issue. Read on to read the third page of the second chapter/issue (every day this week I’ll feature another page from Chapter 2).
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Q2: The Return of Quantum and Woody #1 Review

q2One thing that I think is fairly important to look at with the return of Christopher Priest and M.D. Bright to their original creations, Quantum and Woody, is that this is the second time that they have returned to these characters after a long absence. Of course, the big difference is that in this case, the absence was fourteen years. But before there was a gap of over a year between seeming end of the first series and the short-lived revival of the series. So Priest has had some experience with living up to heightened expectations from the absence. The first time around, he totally pulled it off, with some inspired comic book issues (including an ill-fated Black Panther metafictional crossover that was almost awesome). But fourteen years is a whole other story, right? Or is it? Let’s find out by taking a look see at Q2: The Return of Quantum and Woody #1 by Christopher Priest, M.D. Bright, Dexter Vines and Allen Passalaqua…
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Committed: Event Recap (LBCC, The Walking Dead Premiere, The Last SF APExpo, & Ed Piskor at Isotope’s APE Aftermath Party)

101514_edThis is the event write-up and photo diary that got so big, it took me two weeks to pull it all together. First I went from Long Beach Comic Con, to The Walking Dead premiere in Los Angeles, then to San Francisco for the Alternative Press Expo, and on from there to the annual APE Aftermath party at Isotope Comics. Here’s what happened… Continue Reading »

Wytches #1 Review

wytches1This isn’t exactly like I’m revealing some shocking piece of information to you, as everyone pretty much knows what I’m about to say already, but damned if Matt Hollingsworth isn’t one of the most amazing colorists working in comics today. What I am especially always so impressed about Hollingsworth’s work is that there’s no signature Hollingsworth coloring “style.” It’s not like you sign Hollingsworth on and you know exactly what kind of look you’re going to get – he excels so much at matching his colors with the style and the mood of the book. He works essentially in concert (“essentially” because he is obviously doing his work independent of the penciler/inker) with the artists of his books to create an experience unique to each title. Hell, forget “unique to each title,” with his recent work in the pages of Hawkeye, he has created a unique look for every other ISSUE (one look for David Aja with Clint’s adventures in New York and one for Annie Wu with Kate’s adventures in Los Angeles). Now don’t get me wrong, since he has had such great success coloring particularly moody books like Aja’s Hawkeye, Maleev’s Daredevil and Lark’s Daredevil, people looking for a moody title often DO look to him, so if you want to suggest that that is a “signature” style, then you might have something to that, but even there, there is room for great variety in the look of the title (his stint on Daredevil with Maleev looked different than his stint on Daredevil with Lark, for instance) – and that is extremely evident in Wytches #1 from Image Comics, written by Scott Snyder with pencils and inks by Jock and colors by Hollingworth.
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The Great Comic Book Cover Homage Streak: Week 107

It occurs to me that it seems like many comic book covers are homages. Which is fine with me. I have no problem with it. It just made me think, though, how long could I go before I hit a week where NO new comic book was released that had a cover that was an homage to something? Let’s find out! Here is an archive of all the cover homages featured in the streak so far!

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Archie #660 Review

archie660In general, Archie stories are marked by their general brevity. This is because the escapades that Archie and the gang get into tend to be the sort of things that wrap themselves up quickly. The characters are so well-defined by now that even eleven pages often feels like a full story, as so much of the character work comes completed before the writer has even begun the story. You don’t have to explain why Betty and Veronica are fighting over Archie – it is just a conceit accepted by nearly anyone who picks up an Archie story. Thus, a typical Archie story has a quick hook that resolves itself quickly. This is not a shot at those stories, as I absolutely adore Craig Boldman’s work for Archie and his stories tend to be in the realm of the six-pager. Coming up with four good six-page stories in a single issue is a tremendous feat in my book. At the same time, though, it is also impressive to come up with a plot hook that can sustain a full-sized issue. I’ve been meaning to give Tom DeFalco’s recent work on Archie a bit of a shout out, as he has done some strong full-length issues recently. However, today I’ll take a look at the latest issue of Archie, where Ales Segura puts a fun twist on the classic “guy making dates with two girls on the same night” plot. In Archie #660, with art by Jeff Shultz and Rick Koslowsksi, Segura goes for double the laughs with Archie making a date with FOUR girls in a single night!
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Ex-Con #2 Review

excon2One of the things that really stood out to me about the second issue of Ex-Con #2 (from Dynamite by writer Duane Swierczynski and artists Keith Burns and Aikau Oliva) is the confidence that Swierczynski has in his “lights” concept. The conceit established in the first issue is that the protagonist of the book, Cody Pomeroy, used to be able to “read” the colored auras that people had around them and use those lights to manipulate them to his benefit. After being betrayed by his ex-girlfriend and sent to prison for five years, he lost the ability after being nearly beaten to death in prison. His life was saved by a big bad guy who saved Cody in exchange for Cody owing him a favor. Now, out of prison, Cody must do a favor for the big bad guy but try to use his old con man skills without the big cheat sheet he had with him since he was a kid. So here’s where I’m particularly impressed – in the first issue, Swierczynski established what color meant what. Well, as I noted, Cody lost his ability to read colors in the previous issue and I was surprised to see the concept dropped so quickly. However, in an interesting twist, the auras continue in the story – Cody just can’t read them anymore. WE can but he can’t. That’s a clever use of the idea but morover, Swierczynski doesn’t spell the colors out for us in this second issue. I just re-read #1 earlier today and I can’t remember which color went with what (besides, of course, green going with greed, because that’s just obvious) but there’s no explanation in #2 to everyone’s colors. You just have to either remember, check back to the guide in #1 or eventually figure it out based on context (if enough blues coincide with people telling the truth than you gotta figure blue means people are telling the truth). I love that confidence. It’s audacious. It’s very cool.
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Year of the Artist, Day 287: Greg Ruth, Part 3 – Conan #46

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Greg Ruth, and the issue is Conan #46, which was published by Dark Horse and is cover dated November 2007. These scans are from Conan volume 0: Born on the Battlefield, which was published in June 2008. Enjoy!
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Tea Party: Chapter 2, Page 2

Line it is Drawn artists Thea Sousa and her daughter Amanda are doing a new webcomic with writer Sam Machado. It is called Tea Party and it is about the earliest days of the American Revolution. Click here to read the first chapter/issue. Read on to read the second page of the second chapter/issue (every day this week I’ll feature another page from Chapter 2).
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