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Copperhead #1 Review

copperhead1Writing period pieces is always an interesting exercise in deciding WHEN to set your story, since you have the benefit of finding the ideal period with the most dramatic impact. David Milch was lucky that Deadwood had a built-in timeline, of sorts, in that Seth Bullock and Wild Bill Hicock both arrived in Deadwood in 1876 and the whole town burned down in 1879, so that gave him a perfect period in which to set his show (sadly, we never actually got to the town burning down before the show was canceled). So that’s a real blessing with something like Jay Faerber’s new western, Copperhead, in that since it is set in the distant future, Faerber can just CREATE a great time period to set his story and that’s exactly what he did. Copperhead is set in the aftermath of a great space war where the humans have defeated the aliens but now they all have to live together and this being outer space, the idea of the “frontier” takes on a whole new meaning. However, as evoked so ably in this comic, was being out on the frontier of the American West really all that different from being on a whole other planet? Weren’t you just as isolated and just as on your own? Faerber explores these ideas and more in this compelling new series with artwork by Scott Godlewski and Ron Riley.
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Year of the Artist, Day 300: Ted Naifeh, Part 2 – Comics’ Greatest World: Steel Harbor #2 and Dark Horse Comics #14

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Ted Naifeh, and the issues are Comics’ Greatest World: Steel Harbor #2 and Dark Horse Comics #14, which were published by Dark Horse and are cover dated August and October 1993. Enjoy!
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She Has No Head! – Superheroine Halloween Costumes, Minor Tragedies of our Time!

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Least flattering cut out EVER. Seriously, don’t try this at home unless you’re Emma Frost and you live in a comic book.

I love Halloween. It’s easily my favorite holiday. Christmas is a close second thanks to all the nostalgia (my parents do an epic warm Christmas). But there’s so much pressure on Christmas (just like New Years) that it can start to feel like obligation more than celebration and even I grow weary of the music and everything that comes with it which seems to creep into our lives earlier and earlier each year.

But Halloween never gets aggressive or greedy. It just hangs back being awesome. Go out and have the night of your life, or just hang back and eat chocolate and watch scary movies. Both are completely acceptable.

So it bums me out every year, especially the last five or so when superheroes have become so popular and mainstream to see so many lazy superhero costumes and since this is a column about women in comics we’ll focus on the superheroine costumes especially. The “super sexy” versions of costumes (that were already reasonably high on the sexy to begin with) get pretty tedious too, but my beef is not with costumes that are “too sexy” my beef is with costumes that are lazy as all get out or worse, don’t make a lick of goddamn sense (and not in the good way that things sometimes don’t make sense). Here are a few that really ticked me off in my hunt this year…

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Abandoned Love: The New 52 Batgirl Overhaul

Every installment of Abandoned Love we will be examining comic book stories, plots and ideas that were abandoned by a later writer while still acknowledging that the abandoned story DID still happen. Click here for an archive of all the previous editions of Abandoned Love. Feel free to e-mail me at bcronin@comicbookresources.com if you have any suggestions for future editions of this feature.

This time around, we look at the recent “soft reboot” of the New 52 Batgirl…
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Year of the Artist, Day 299: Ted Naifeh, Part 1 – The Shadow of the Torturer #1

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Ted Naifeh, and the issue is The Shadow of the Torturer #1, which was published by Innovation and is cover dated July 1991. Enjoy!
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Almost Hidden – William Messner-Loebs’ Run on Flash

Even with this large amount of comic books that have been collected in trade paperbacks, there are still a number of great comic books that have never been reprinted in print (I’d say roughly 60% of them are DC Comics from the 1980s through the mid-1990s). So in this feature I spotlight different cool comic books that are only available as back issues. Here is an archive of the comic books featured so far.

Today we look at William Messner-Loebs’ run on the Flash (which Greg LaRocque penciled almost the entire run, with a bunch of different inkers, Larry Mahlstedt most commonly)…
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Don’t Send Me No More Letters No – How Does Superman Avoid Crushing the People He Catches?

In this feature I spotlight responses that amuse me for whatever reason by Mort Weisinger to letters fans wrote in to the Superman family of titles back in the 1950s and 1960s. Here is an archive of past installments.

Today we take a look at a debate that continued from the Silver Age all the way to one of the very first episodes of The Big Bang Theory, “Why doesn’t Superman crush people when he catches them falling at high speeds?”
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Boys, Toys, Electric Irons, and TVs 24: Futures End #25 and Avengers #37

Last week, I rambled on about the lack of superheroes in both Futures End and the two Avengers titles written by Jonathan Hickman (or about what constitutes a ‘superhero’ at this point) and, as much as I’d like to find some other topic to ramble on about this week, a couple of big ol’ softballs were lobbed up in the form of shirtless, bearded Superman and obsessive, cranky old-man Captain America. The two most ‘superheroic’ characters in DC and Marvel depicted as men that barely resemble their so-called superheroic selves. If these two aren’t superheroes anymore, what hope is there for anyone?

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Year of the Artist, Day 298: Lee Moder, Part 5 – Shinku #2

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Lee Moder, and the issue is Shinku #2, which was published by Image and is cover dated July 2011. Enjoy!
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The Great Comic Book Cover Homage Streak: Week 109

It occurs to me that it seems like many comic book covers are homages. Which is fine with me. I have no problem with it. It just made me think, though, how long could I go before I hit a week where NO new comic book was released that had a cover that was an homage to something? Let’s find out! Here is an archive of all the cover homages featured in the streak so far!

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The Case of the Missing Rabbit

I am going to pretend that the absence of David Branstetter’s “Case of the Missing Rabbit” piece in this week’s Line it is Drawn was all part of the plan, so that I could reveal it to you all here now…
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Year of the Artist, Day 297: Lee Moder, Part 4 – Days Missing #3

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Lee Moder, and the issue is Days Missing #3, which was published by Archaia and is cover dated October 2009. Enjoy!
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Cross-Hatchings for October 2014

Bits and pieces. This-n-that. Wonder Woman, the Shadow, and two-fisted time travel. Continue Reading »

Comic Book Legends Revealed #494

Welcome to the four hundred and ninety-fourth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the previous four hundred and ninety-three. This week, did Twin Peaks almost continue as a comic book? Does Marvel really have a trademark on the words “thwip” and “snikt”? Was Bobbi “Mockingbird” Morse’s debut published six issues after her first appearance?

Let’s begin!

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The Line it is Drawn #212 – The Comic Book Detectives Are On The Case!

Welcome to our weekly gallery of amazing art by our great collection of artistic talent, all working from YOUR suggestions!

Go follow Comics Should Be Good on Twitter (if you have Twitter, that is – if you don’t, you can go sign up). Here is our Twitter page… http://twitter.com/csbg. And here are the Comics Should Be Good writers who are on Twitter (the links go to the person’s Twitter account) – myself, Greg Hatcher, Chad Nevett, Kelly Thompson, Bill Reed, Greg Burgas, Sonia Harris, Melissa K. and Ken H.

I update the blog’s Twitter account updates whenever a new post is put up on the blog, so it’s an easy way to keep up with the blog. In addition, I post new content on the blog’s Twitter account.

Now on to the bit!

So every week, I ask a question here. You reply to it on our Twitter page (just write @csbg with your reply) and our blog sketch artists will each pick one of your suggestions and I will post them here every week. So every week you will have a new question and you will see the choices picked from the previous week. Here is an archive of all the previous editions of The Line It Is Drawn!

To qualify, you have to be following us when you reply – so go follow us and then give your answer to the following question/challenge (All suggestions due by 3pm Pacific Friday).

The topic is…

For our annual Halloween edition, place comic characters into famous horror stories, whether they be novels, short stories, movies or television shows

Read on for the sketches that came about courtesy of the last question/challenge!

It’s True Comic Book Detective time! Pick a solo comic book character and then come up with some sort of comic book-related case that you’d like to see them solve. Just a case title and our artists will figure out the rest. For instance, “Hawkeye and the Case of the Faulty Quinjet” or “Spider-Man and the Case of the Vanishing Wife.” So your tweet should be in the format of “(Name of Superhero) and the Case of (Whatever you Want the Case to Be)” This is a SECRET Theme week, also! Our own Chaz suggested that we not spoil the fact that our heroes are not solving these cases alone. No sir, it is our second annual JOHN MUNCH WEEK! Yep, the longtime TV detective will be teaming up with our heroes in each piece this week!

Enjoy!
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