web stats

Recent Posts

Wytches #1 Review

wytches1This isn’t exactly like I’m revealing some shocking piece of information to you, as everyone pretty much knows what I’m about to say already, but damned if Matt Hollingsworth isn’t one of the most amazing colorists working in comics today. What I am especially always so impressed about Hollingsworth’s work is that there’s no signature Hollingsworth coloring “style.” It’s not like you sign Hollingsworth on and you know exactly what kind of look you’re going to get – he excels so much at matching his colors with the style and the mood of the book. He works essentially in concert (“essentially” because he is obviously doing his work independent of the penciler/inker) with the artists of his books to create an experience unique to each title. Hell, forget “unique to each title,” with his recent work in the pages of Hawkeye, he has created a unique look for every other ISSUE (one look for David Aja with Clint’s adventures in New York and one for Annie Wu with Kate’s adventures in Los Angeles). Now don’t get me wrong, since he has had such great success coloring particularly moody books like Aja’s Hawkeye, Maleev’s Daredevil and Lark’s Daredevil, people looking for a moody title often DO look to him, so if you want to suggest that that is a “signature” style, then you might have something to that, but even there, there is room for great variety in the look of the title (his stint on Daredevil with Maleev looked different than his stint on Daredevil with Lark, for instance) – and that is extremely evident in Wytches #1 from Image Comics, written by Scott Snyder with pencils and inks by Jock and colors by Hollingworth.
Continue Reading »

The Great Comic Book Cover Homage Streak: Week 107

It occurs to me that it seems like many comic book covers are homages. Which is fine with me. I have no problem with it. It just made me think, though, how long could I go before I hit a week where NO new comic book was released that had a cover that was an homage to something? Let’s find out! Here is an archive of all the cover homages featured in the streak so far!

Continue Reading »

Archie #660 Review

archie660In general, Archie stories are marked by their general brevity. This is because the escapades that Archie and the gang get into tend to be the sort of things that wrap themselves up quickly. The characters are so well-defined by now that even eleven pages often feels like a full story, as so much of the character work comes completed before the writer has even begun the story. You don’t have to explain why Betty and Veronica are fighting over Archie – it is just a conceit accepted by nearly anyone who picks up an Archie story. Thus, a typical Archie story has a quick hook that resolves itself quickly. This is not a shot at those stories, as I absolutely adore Craig Boldman’s work for Archie and his stories tend to be in the realm of the six-pager. Coming up with four good six-page stories in a single issue is a tremendous feat in my book. At the same time, though, it is also impressive to come up with a plot hook that can sustain a full-sized issue. I’ve been meaning to give Tom DeFalco’s recent work on Archie a bit of a shout out, as he has done some strong full-length issues recently. However, today I’ll take a look at the latest issue of Archie, where Ales Segura puts a fun twist on the classic “guy making dates with two girls on the same night” plot. In Archie #660, with art by Jeff Shultz and Rick Koslowsksi, Segura goes for double the laughs with Archie making a date with FOUR girls in a single night!
Continue Reading »

Ex-Con #2 Review

excon2One of the things that really stood out to me about the second issue of Ex-Con #2 (from Dynamite by writer Duane Swierczynski and artists Keith Burns and Aikau Oliva) is the confidence that Swierczynski has in his “lights” concept. The conceit established in the first issue is that the protagonist of the book, Cody Pomeroy, used to be able to “read” the colored auras that people had around them and use those lights to manipulate them to his benefit. After being betrayed by his ex-girlfriend and sent to prison for five years, he lost the ability after being nearly beaten to death in prison. His life was saved by a big bad guy who saved Cody in exchange for Cody owing him a favor. Now, out of prison, Cody must do a favor for the big bad guy but try to use his old con man skills without the big cheat sheet he had with him since he was a kid. So here’s where I’m particularly impressed – in the first issue, Swierczynski established what color meant what. Well, as I noted, Cody lost his ability to read colors in the previous issue and I was surprised to see the concept dropped so quickly. However, in an interesting twist, the auras continue in the story – Cody just can’t read them anymore. WE can but he can’t. That’s a clever use of the idea but morover, Swierczynski doesn’t spell the colors out for us in this second issue. I just re-read #1 earlier today and I can’t remember which color went with what (besides, of course, green going with greed, because that’s just obvious) but there’s no explanation in #2 to everyone’s colors. You just have to either remember, check back to the guide in #1 or eventually figure it out based on context (if enough blues coincide with people telling the truth than you gotta figure blue means people are telling the truth). I love that confidence. It’s audacious. It’s very cool.
Continue Reading »

Year of the Artist, Day 287: Greg Ruth, Part 3 – Conan #46

conan2002 (2)

Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Greg Ruth, and the issue is Conan #46, which was published by Dark Horse and is cover dated November 2007. These scans are from Conan volume 0: Born on the Battlefield, which was published in June 2008. Enjoy!
Continue Reading »

Tea Party: Chapter 2, Page 2

Line it is Drawn artists Thea Sousa and her daughter Amanda are doing a new webcomic with writer Sam Machado. It is called Tea Party and it is about the earliest days of the American Revolution. Click here to read the first chapter/issue. Read on to read the second page of the second chapter/issue (every day this week I’ll feature another page from Chapter 2).
Continue Reading »

Ex-Con #1 Review

excon1Ex-Con is a new series from Dynamite written by Duane Swierczynski with art by Keith Burns and Aikau Oliva. It tells the story of a 1980s con man who gets caught and upon his release at the end of the decade, must use his skills to go to work for a rich developer who is somehow involved with the con man’s ex-girlfriend who put him behind bars in the first place. The developer and the ex-girlfriend are also somehow connected to a powerful bad guy that the con man met in prison. The brilliant Tim Bradstreet cover perfectly conveys the mood that this book is going for, as what we have here is a guy who always felt that he was the smartest guy in the room only now hie whole life is thrown for a loop and he must adjust to the changes while somehow keeping himself from either being thrown back into jail or worse, getting himself killed. The way that Bradstreet depicts a guy who is trying to remain cool while his whole life is falling apart makes for one striking cover.
Continue Reading »

Year of the Artist, Day 286: Greg Ruth, Part 2 – Freaks of the Heartland #6

freaks2002 (2)

Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Greg Ruth, and the issue is Freaks of the Heartland #6, which was published by Dark Horse and is cover dated November 2004. Enjoy!
Continue Reading »

Tea Party: Chapter 2, Page 1

Line it is Drawn artists Thea Sousa and her daughter Amanda are doing a new webcomic with writer Sam Machado. It is called Tea Party and it is about the earliest days of the American Revolution. Click here to read the first chapter/issue. Read on to read the first page of the second chapter/issue (every day this week I’ll feature another page from Chapter 2).
Continue Reading »

Check Out the First Chapter of Tea Party!

Thea Sousa and her daughter Amanda, who you all know from their fine work on The Line it is Drawn (just this past week they did an excellent piece depicting Super Grover as a villain) for the last couple of years (as penciler and colorist, respectively) are the art team on a new web comic about the early days of the American Revolution, written by Sam Machado.

In a little bit, I’m going to begin spotlighting the first five pages of the second chapter/issue of their comic (one each day this week). But first I thought it’d be helpful to provide for you all the link to the FIRST chapter/issue of their promising new work. Below is the cover of the first chapter…
Continue Reading »

She Has No Head! – Top Ten of NYCC 2014 News

Silk 1 Stacey Lee Variant

Silk #1 Variant by Stacey Lee!

Counting down the best things for “Women in Comics” to come out of NYCC this weekend!

To be honest, going into a big con week I never know if there’s going be enough material to make a decent post of for She Has No Head. Sometimes I’ve struggled to come up with new announcements to write about, even after a big con. And then there are weeks where it’s hard to whittle your list down to ten items and you come it at well over 3,000 words. Well done, NYCC, well done!

I’ll also say that though I am “con averse” in general and was out of town for most of the festivities anyway, this was the first time I have been following the news (and even more so the tweets) and really felt like I missed out. So many great creators I love were out and force and being recognized for the insanely talented individuals they are and it made me feel so genuinely joyous (though disappointed to have missed out). Also, a huge thanks to all the people that so valiantly brave the con to do such great reporting, you guys are soldiers – soldiers that seemed like you were having an incredible time.

Onward to the list!

Continue Reading »

Year of the Artist, Day 285: Greg Ruth, Part 1 – Sudden Gravity

suddengravity4004 (2)

Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Greg Ruth, and the comic is Sudden Gravity, which was published by Caliber Comics in 1998/1999. These scans are from the Dark Horse reprint, which is cover dated July 2006. Enjoy!
Continue Reading »

The Abandoned An’ Forsaked – Are Wolverine’s Claws Part of His Mutation or What?

In this feature we examine comic book stories and ideas that were not only abandoned, but also had the stories/plots specifically “overturned” by a later writer (as if they were a legal precedent). Click here for an archive of all the previous editions of The Abandoned An’ Forsaked. Feel free to e-mail me at bcronin@comicbookresources.com if you have any suggestions for future editions of this feature.

Today we take a look at the odd history of Wolverine’s claws…
Continue Reading »

Premiere Week– Bullet Points Edition

Hardly read any comics at all this week, but watched a lot of TV. And my God, but there was a lot of comics-inspired nerdy TV out there to check out. I’m too lazy to write lengthy reviews of each show we watched, and we didn’t see everything anyway, but I’ll give you short reactions to those we did see. How’s that? Continue Reading »

Year of the Artist, Day 284: Steve Rude, Part 4 – Dark Horse Presents #34

nexus3003 (2)

Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Steve Rude, and the story is “Nexus: Into the Past, Chapter 10″ in Dark Horse Presents #34, which was published by Dark Horse and is cover dated March 2014. Enjoy!
Continue Reading »

Categories

Review Copies

Comics Should Be Good accepts review copies. Anything sent to us will (for better or for worse) end up reviewed on the blog. See where to send the review copies.

Browse the Archives