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Comic Book Six Degrees: The Secret to Slimer

I name two comic book characters. You then have to connect the two using only shared appearances in comic books (official appearances in comics only – no cameos like Terry Austin sneaking Popeye into the background of a panel and no outside comic book appearances, like cartoons and the like). You have to do so using less than six comics total. Covers and pin-ups do not count – only actual appearances in the same comic book story (so it doesn’t count if they each appeared in separate stories inside the same anthology). Mythological characters, public domain characters (other than public domain comic book characters, they’re free game) and real people (by the way, unless a fake name is used for a real person, like Ronald Raygun or whatever, you can use the person even if they are not officially named in the comic) are unique to their own comic book appearances (so DC’s Thor is different than Marvel’s Thor, DC’s Ronald Reagan is different from Marvel’s Ronald Reagan, etc.). But a licensed character is the same in all of their various comic book companies (so the Marvel Red Sonja is the same as the Dynamite Red Sonja) and approved appearances by a real person can go across comic book companies, as well (so, for instance, you can use Marv Wolfman from his Teen Titans appearance to connect with Marv Wolfman in his Fantastic Four appearance – you just can’t use modern appearances by Jack Kirby from one company to connect to Jack Kirby appearances from Marvel Comics, since obviously Kirby can no longer give approval for his appearance). Approval tends to be the key.

Every week, whoever connects the two characters in the least amount of turns gets to pick the next week’s match (in the event of a tie, the winner is chosen randomly among the people who sent in challenges for next week). Last time was Miracleman to Stardust the Super Wizard. Paul L. was one of two people to get it in just two moves. Here is how Paul connected the two…

NOTE: Before I begin, let me again request that when you folks send in your answers to please include your suggestion for next week if your answer is chosen. Oh, and it would be nice if you demonstrate that it IS possible to connect your two suggested choices. Thanks!

MiracleMan was in Total Eclipse #3 with The Black Terror
The Black Terror was in The Next Issue Project AKA Fantastic Comics #24
with Stardust, in the story title Stardust together.

Paul’s challenge is…

The Secret to Slimer

E-mail me your answers at bcronin@comicbookresources.com. Do NOT post your answers in the comments section!

Whoever connects the two characters in the least amount of comics gets to pick the connection for next time around (I’ll pick a random winner in the event of a tie)!

Remember, only authorized appearances in comic books count (for instance, all the Marvel characters in Savage Dragon/Destroyer Duck do not count)!

Year of the Artist, Day 230: Norm Breyfogle, Part 4 – Hellcat #2

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Norm Breyfogle, and the issue is Hellcat #2, which was published by Marvel and is cover dated October 2000. Enjoy!
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3 Chicks Review Comics – Episode #069

It’s EPISODE #069!!!3 Chicks Logo 2 - Blue

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON PODBEAN

OR – FIND US HERE ON iTUNES & SUBSCRIBE

Inside this episode! 

We begin with a review of the brand new Hexed #1 by Michael Alan Nelson, Dan Mora, and Gabriel Cassata. Then a review of the previous week’s She-Hulk #7, the best issue yet for the new series, brought to you by Charles Soule, Javier Pulido, and Muntsa Vicente. Kevin Wada did the gorgeous cover seen below.  Up next we have an interview with Black Widow writer Nathan Edmondson. Responsible for Marvel’s current Black Widow title, and also the fantastic, critically acclaimed, and coming soon to a theater near you – Who is Jake Ellis? and the current Where is Jake Ellis?, Edmondson talk about his approach to Natasha and working with both Phil Noto and Tonci Zonjic. We then talk a little bit about the Guardians of the Galaxy movie, general comics news, and Sue gives us an update on Boston Comic Con, where she was last weekend. Finally Sue managed to find an adorable DRAMATIC READING. Enjoy!

*sidebard: we had a bit of trouble with audio difficulties this week – just imagine while you listen that I am Rob Brydon’s famous “small man trapped in a box.” And if you haven’t seen The Trip, you all should get on that. Greatest. Show. Ever.

3 Chicks Review Comics is a podcast featuring female comics lovers and bloggers. Sue from DC Women Kicking Ass and Kelly Thompson from She Has No Head! Tune in to CSBG every other Monday at noon as we review comics and discuss hot topics of the week. In addition to the blogs above, you can also follow us all on twitter as well: Kelly and Sue.  Special thanks to Caanan Grall for our incredible 3 Chicks Logo and to Nik Furious for our awesome 3 Chicks theme song.

Episode 069 Covers

Year of the Artist, Day 229: Norm Breyfogle, Part 3 – So much BATMAN!!!!

breyfoglebatman3003 (2)

Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Norm Breyfogle, and the issues are … well, there’s just so much Batman, I actually separated the post into four parts, just like Our Dread Lord and Master does with Comic Book Legends! Up first: Detective Comics #607, which was published by DC and is cover dated October 1989. Enjoy all the comics!
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Boys, Toys, Electric Irons, and TVs 14: Futures End #15

So, what’s the deal with Superman? We’re rushing towards the big reveal of why Superman wears a mask now and why his personality seems to have changed, and it’s apparently none of the reasons people previously thought. His conversation with Lois here is one of the longer ones he’s had in the series – and one of the most revealing.

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Things That Turned Out Bad – The Racially Segregated Superhero of the Future!

In this column, I will spotlight plotlines by writers that probably weren’t a good idea at the time and have only become more problematic in retrospect. I’ll try to stick with stuff that’s more ill-conceived than flat-out offensive (like racist stereotypes of characters during the 1940s).

Today we look at the introduction of the first black member of the Legion of Super-Heroes…
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Saturday, to My Immediate Right

It was kind of a rough week here in our household– nothing terrible, just stupid work stuff and car trouble and a concurrent inability to shake any money out of the seven different establishments that owe us some. And then there’s all the news, about equal parts beloved celebrities dying and political things that give a fellow the “warm sweet urge to hit congresscritters repeatedly in the face,” as one friend of mine Tweeted. So this week I figured on something short and cheerful, and then it occurred to me that maybe some of you would like to play along at home. Continue Reading »

Year of the Artist, Day 228: Norm Breyfogle, Part 2 – Whisper #10

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Norm Breyfogle, and the issue is Whisper #10, which was published by First Comics and is cover dated December 1987. Enjoy!
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Comic Book Easter Eggs – These ARE the Easter Eggs You’re Looking For! More Star Wars Easter Eggs!

In this feature, I share with you three comic book “easter eggs.” An easter egg is a joke/visual gag/in-joke that a comic book creator (typically the artist) has hidden in the pages of the comic for readers to find (just like an easter egg). They range from the not-so-obscure to the really obscure. So come check ‘em all out and enjoy! Also, click here for an archive of all the easter eggs featured so far! If you want to suggest an easter egg for a future column, e-mail me at bcronin@comicbookresources.com (do not post your suggestion in the comments section!).

Today we take a look at some more Star Wars easter eggs!
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Year of the Artist, Day 227: Norm Breyfogle, Part 1 – New Talent Showcase #11 and Marvel Fanfare #29

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Norm Breyfogle, and the stories are “Pacer” in New Talent Showcase #11 and “Story” in Marvel Fanfare #29, the first of which was published by DC and is cover dated November 1984 and the second of which was published by Marvel and is cover dated November 1986. Enjoy!
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Comic Book Legends Revealed #484

Welcome to the four hundred and eighty-fourth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the previous four hundred and eighty-three. It’s an all-Batman legends edition of Comic Book Legends Revealed this week! First off, was the first Batman comic book story seriously taken from a Shadow story? Did Bob Kane actually draw Batman’s confrontation with Joe Chill? And did the producers of Batman Forever fire Robin Williams from the film?

Let’s begin!

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The Line it is Drawn #202 – Guardians of the Galaxy Movie Mash-Ups!

Welcome to our weekly gallery of amazing art by our great collection of artistic talent, all working from YOUR suggestions!

Go follow Comics Should Be Good on Twitter (if you have Twitter, that is – if you don’t, you can go sign up). Here is our Twitter page… http://twitter.com/csbg. And here are the Comics Should Be Good writers who are on Twitter (the links go to the person’s Twitter account) – myself, Greg Hatcher, Chad Nevett, Kelly Thompson, Bill Reed, Greg Burgas, Sonia Harris, Melissa K. and Ken H.

I update the blog’s Twitter account updates whenever a new post is put up on the blog, so it’s an easy way to keep up with the blog. In addition, I post new content on the blog’s Twitter account.

Now on to the bit!

So every week, I ask a question here. You reply to it on our Twitter page (just write @csbg with your reply) and our blog sketch artists will each pick one of your suggestions and I will post them here every week. So every week you will have a new question and you will see the choices picked from the previous week. Here is an archive of all the previous editions of The Line It Is Drawn!

To qualify, you have to be following us when you reply – so go follow us and then give your answer to the following question/challenge (All suggestions due by 3pm Pacific Friday).

The topic is…

In honor of the great Robin Williams, team-up or mash-up comic book characters with Robin Williams characters from film or television

Read on for the sketches that came about courtesy of the last question/challenge!

The Guardians of the Galaxy have dominated the box office, but they’re not stopping there! They want to take over ALL movies! So mash-up the Guardians of the Galaxy (single members of the team or the team as a whole) with other famous movies! The Groot, the Bad and the Ugly, stuff like that.

Enjoy!
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Year of the Artist, Day 226: Tony Harris, Part 5 – Chin Music #1

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Tony Harris, and the issue is Chin Music #1, which was published by Image and is cover dated May 2013. Enjoy!
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1987 And All That: Fallen Angels #1-8

FallenAngels1Fallen Angels #1-8 (Marvel) by Jo Duffy, Kerry Gammill (#1-2, 4, 7), Marie Severin (#3), Joe Staton (#5-6, 8), Tom Palmer (#1-3, 7), Val Mayerik (#4-6), Tony DeZuniga (#8), Petra Scotese, Jim Novak (#1-2), Bill Oakley (#3, 5-8), L.P. Gregory (#4), and Ann Nocenti

As a story about a group of misfit superpowered kids, it’s appropriate that Fallen Angels would be something of a misfit superhero series, too. It’s not at all a bad comic, but it doesn’t look, feel, or move like your typical cape-and-cowl adventure. Its cast is cobbled together from characters old and new, popular (at the time, at least) and obscure, and the characters are constantly butting heads with one another. This internal conflict leaves little room for external enemies, so there aren’t really any villains for the stars to face until the last couple issues. There also aren’t a lot of codenames or costumes used; even Sunspot, the protagonist and narrator, is referred to by his real name, Roberto “Bobby” da Costa, more often than not. It’s a non-traditional team with mixed morals and motives, not fighting for good or evil but merely sticking together for the sake of survival and some semblance of friendship/family. Fallen Angels is a coming-of-age story for the entire titular team, and it is more interested in studying human behavior than the high-powered violence of the average superhero tale. In this story, being a teenager comes first, and having powers comes second, an interesting and unusual prioritization that makes for an entertaining if not astonishing read. Continue Reading »

Cover Theme Game for 8/13

The cover theme game works like this: I’ll show you three covers. They all have something in common, whether it be a character, a trait all three characters share, a connection between all three characters, a locale, a trait all three creators share, SOMEthing. And it isn’t something obvious like “They all have prices!” “They all have logos!” “They all feature a man!” “They are all Avengers (who ISN’T?)!” “They’re all dead (who HASN’T been killed off?)!” “They’ve all been cloned (who HASN’T been cloned?)!” “They’re all mutants!” (who ISN’T a mutant?) “They’re all orphans!” (who ISN’T an orphan?) “They’re all legacy heroes” (who ISN’T a legacy hero nowadays?)! “They’re all by the same artist!” (too obvious) etc.

In addition, please note that you must have some familiarity with comic book history to correctly guess these themes. You cannot guess the connective theme just by looking at the covers solely, you must have some knowledge beyond the covers. The connections will ONLY have to do with connections in the actual comic books (so no incidental connections like “they share the same last names of Vice Presidents,” etc. Now, if the three characters were each named Gerald Ford, that’d be another story, as that’d no longer be incidental).

If you come up with an answer that works outside of what I intended, I’ll give you credit (well, provided I think it fits, of course).

One more thing – if there are floating heads on the cover, ignore them! They don’t mean anything! Same thing with corner boxes!

If you think you know the answer, e-mail me at bcronin@comicbookresources.com. Don’t answer in the comments. This way, people who check in at different times of the day can still get credit for answering it correctly!

Here is an archive of all the past cover theme games, plus their answers. Before each new installment, I’ll post the answers to the previous week’s game.

Good luck and enjoy! Continue Reading »

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