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75 Greatest Batman Stories: #65-56

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In honor of the seventy-fifth anniversary of Batman, we’re doing four straight months of polls having to do with Batman, culminating with the official 75th anniversary of Batman on July 23rd. We’ve done Batman covers, Batman characters, Batman creastors and now, finally, Batman stories!

You all voted, now here are the results of what you chose as the 75 Greatest Batman Stories! Here are #65-56!

Enjoy!
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Gimmick or Good? – Bloodshot #1

Bloodshot1_coverIn this column, Mark Ginocchio (from Chasing Amazing) takes a look at the gimmick covers from the 1990s and gives his take on whether the comic in question was just a gimmick or whether the comic within the gimmick cover was good. Hence “Gimmick or Good?” Here is an archive of all the comics featured so far. We continue with the first chromium cover, Blooshot #1!

Bloodshoot #1 (published February 1993) – script by Kevin VanHook, art by Don Perlin. Cover by Barry Windsor-Smith

Proving once again that the gimmicks of the 1990s are alive and well, Valiant has been publishing special edition “chromium” covers for its Armor Hunters, Unity, X-O Manowar, Armor Hunters: Bloodshot and Armor Hunters: Harbinger series. So today, I thought Gimmick or Good should take a look at the comic book industry’s very first chromium cover, 1993’s Bloodshot #1.

In the early 1990s, Valiant did quite well for itself sales-wise whenever it published one of these special edition gimmick covers, despite not having the history or name recognition of Marvel, or the “extreme” sexiness of Image Comics. Bloodshot #1 was no different, as the chromium cover was considered a true innovation when it was released winning awards and selling about a million copies.

But what about inside the comic?
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75 Greatest Batman Stories: #75-66

In honor of the seventy-fifth anniversary of Batman, we’re doing four straight months of polls having to do with Batman, culminating with the official 75th anniversary of Batman on July 23rd. We’ve done Batman covers, Batman characters, Batman creastors and now, finally, Batman stories!

You all voted, now here are the results of what you chose as the 75 Greatest Batman Stories!

Enjoy!

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Year of the Artist, Day 192: Rob Liefeld, Part 1 – Secret Origins #28 and Hawk and Dove #1

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Rob Liefeld, and the first story is “A Princess’ Story” in Secret Origins #28 and the issue is Hawk and Dove #1, both of which were published by DC, the first cover dated July 1988 and the second cover dated October 1988. Enjoy!
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Comic Book Legends Revealed #479

Welcome to the four hundred and seventy-ninth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the previous four hundred and seventy-eight. This week, did the “With Great Power…” speech happen to Superman fifteen years before it happened to Spider-Man? Was there really a Hagar the Horrible soda? And was Ventriloquist originally invented as a Judge Dredd villain?

Let’s begin!

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The Line it is Drawn #198 – What if Comic Characters Had Different Creators?

Welcome to our weekly gallery of amazing art by our great collection of artistic talent, all working from YOUR suggestions!

Go follow Comics Should Be Good on Twitter (if you have Twitter, that is – if you don’t, you can go sign up). Here is our Twitter page… http://twitter.com/csbg. And here are the Comics Should Be Good writers who are on Twitter (the links go to the person’s Twitter account) – myself, Greg Hatcher, Chad Nevett, Kelly Thompson, Bill Reed, Greg Burgas, Sonia Harris, Melissa K. and Ken H.

I update the blog’s Twitter account updates whenever a new post is put up on the blog, so it’s an easy way to keep up with the blog. In addition, I post new content on the blog’s Twitter account.

Now on to the bit!

So every week, I ask a question here. You reply to it on our Twitter page (just write @csbg with your reply) and our blog sketch artists will each pick one of your suggestions and I will post them here every week. So every week you will have a new question and you will see the choices picked from the previous week. Here is an archive of all the previous editions of The Line It Is Drawn!

To qualify, you have to be following us when you reply – so go follow us and then give your answer to the following question/challenge (All suggestions due by 3pm Pacific Friday).

The topic is…

In honor of Batman’s 75th anniversary this month, team Batman up with a hero he’s never had a team-up with before or have Batman face a villain he’s never fought before! Or heck, have him team up with a hero he’s never teamed up with AGAINST a villain he’s never fought before! Go nuts!

Read on for the sketches that came about courtesy of the last question/challenge!

Based on an old suggestion by John Trumbull, the topic is character design What If? Like “What if Jack Kirby had designed Batman?” or “What if Spider-Man had been designed in the 1930s?” or “What if Archie had been designed during the 1990s?” Let your imagination go wild!

Enjoy!
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Year of the Artist, Day 191: Steve Ditko, Part 10 – Marvel Comics Presents #83

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Steve Ditko, and the story is “The Matchstick and the Moth” in Marvel Comics Presents #83, which was published by Marvel and is cover dated August 1991. Enjoy!
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Year of the Artist, Day 190: Steve Ditko, Part 9 – Daredevil #264

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Steve Ditko, and the issue is Daredevil #264, which was published by Marvel and is cover dated March 1989. Enjoy!
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1987 And All That: Detective Comics #580-581

A column in which Matt Derman (Comics Matter) reads & reviews comics from 1987, because that’s the year he was born.

DetCom1Detective Comics #580-581 (DC) by Mike W. Barr, Jim Baikie, Pablo Marcos (#581), Adrienne Roy, Annie Halfacree (#580), Albert De Guzman (#581), and Denny O’Neil

I’m going to try as hard as I can not to use the word “two” too often in this column. That may be tricky, since it’s about a two-part story where there are two Two-Faces running around, and it features the version of Two-Face who is so obsessed with the number two that all his crimes are themed around it and most of his dialogue is chock full of two-based puns. But I will genuinely try. Because easily the most aggravating part of reading these issues of Detective Comics is how often the word “two” is used, along with “double” and “couple” and anything else that can be turned into a forced bit of not-so-clever wordplay. It’s lightweight comedy at best, and repetitive, uninspired filler at worst. And while this ineffective humor may be a low point, it’s not all that’s wrong with these comics. Continue Reading »

Year of the Artist, Day 189: Steve Ditko, Part 8 – Coyote #7

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Steve Ditko, and the story is “The Djinn” in Coyote #7, which was published by Marvel (under Epic Comics) and is cover dated July 1984. These scans are from Coyote volume 3, which was published by Image and came out in 2006. Enjoy!
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Comic Book Six Degrees: Pinhead to Faceache

I name two comic book characters. You then have to connect the two using only shared appearances in comic books (official appearances in comics only – no cameos like Terry Austin sneaking Popeye into the background of a panel and no outside comic book appearances, like cartoons and the like). You have to do so using less than six comics total. Covers and pin-ups do not count – only actual appearances in the same comic book story (so it doesn’t count if they each appeared in separate stories inside the same anthology). Mythological characters, public domain characters (other than public domain comic book characters, they’re free game) and real people (by the way, unless a fake name is used for a real person, like Ronald Raygun or whatever, you can use the person even if they are not officially named in the comic) are unique to their own comic book appearances (so DC’s Thor is different than Marvel’s Thor, DC’s Ronald Reagan is different from Marvel’s Ronald Reagan, etc.). But a licensed character is the same in all of their various comic book companies (so the Marvel Red Sonja is the same as the Dynamite Red Sonja) and approved appearances by a real person can go across comic book companies, as well (so, for instance, you can use Marv Wolfman from his Teen Titans appearance to connect with Marv Wolfman in his Fantastic Four appearance – you just can’t use modern appearances by Jack Kirby from one company to connect to Jack Kirby appearances from Marvel Comics, since obviously Kirby can no longer give approval for his appearance). Approval tends to be the key.

Every week, whoever connects the two characters in the least amount of turns gets to pick the next week’s match (in the event of a tie, the winner is chosen randomly among the people who sent in challenges for next week). Last time was Domino Lady to Madame .44. Loki was the only one to connect the two in three moves. Here is how Loki connected the two…

NOTE: Before I begin, let me again request that when you folks send in your answers to please include your suggestion for next week if your answer is chosen. Oh, and it would be nice if you demonstrate that it IS possible to connect your two suggested choices. Thanks!

Domino Lady to Sherlock Holmes in Domino Lady /Sherlock Holmes
Sherlock Holmes to Batman in Detective Comics #572
Batman to Madame .44 in Infinite Crisis #6

Loki’s challenge is…

Pinhead to Faceache

E-mail me your answers at bcronin@comicbookresources.com. Do NOT post your answers in the comments section!

Whoever connects the two characters in the least amount of comics gets to pick the connection for next time around (I’ll pick a random winner in the event of a tie)!

Remember, only authorized appearances in comic books count (for instance, all the Marvel characters in Savage Dragon/Destroyer Duck do not count)!

NOTE: A reader asked me if a character appears in a comic but as a voice only, does that count? What do you all think? Vote in the comments – I’ll accept whatever the majority says.

Year of the Artist, Day 188: Steve Ditko, Part 7 – Heroes, Inc. #2

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Every day this year, I will be examining the artwork on a single comic book story. Today’s artist is Steve Ditko, and the story is “Cannon” (it’s untitled, but that’s good enough) in Heroes, Inc. #2, which was published by CPL/Gang Publications and is cover dated 1976. These scans are from Cannon, which was published by Fantagraphics and came out in March 2014 (and is well worth your money). Enjoy!
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She Has No Head! – I Was Wrong, THIS Marks The Destruction of Feminism at DC Comics

David Finch Wonder Woman and White Rabbit

A promotional image from Finch’s Wonder Woman and Finch’s White Rabbit from his book The Dark Knight. Not nearly as different as they should be.

How do you top turning a matriarchal female society historically depicted as honorable in your comics into absolute monsters? For starters, you assign creators that either don’t know what feminism means, or worse, do know and are still afraid to use that word to describe the preeminent female hero in the world. In 2012 I thought feminism had been destroyed at DC Comics but I was wrong, because there were further lows to which we could descend.

We have found new depths as a creator (David Finch) assigned to the most important woman in comics doesn’t know what the word feminist means, or much much worse, knows what it means and doesn’t think that Wonder Woman is a feminist, in other words, he doesn’t believe that Wonder Woman believes in equality of the sexes.

You know what I can’t believe? That this kind of thing can still happen in the year 2014.

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Review time! with Under the Flesh #1

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“She’s a lady, she is mine – brush back your hair, and let me get to know your flesh.”
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