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A Week With The Perennials

It’s been the kind of bad-news week where I find myself eschewing new books, instead gravitating toward some beloved old favorites for the week’s bus reads. Comfort food.

To me the essence of comfort food reading is the pleasure of the expected. It’s the same reassuring feeling you get from seeing a favorite band play the hits. Just for fun, I thought I’d share a few of those familiar old favorites with you this week. Continue Reading »

Comic Book Legends Revealed #530

Welcome to the five hundred and thirtieth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the first five hundred (I actually haven’t been able to update it in a while). This week, did Marvel create the Spider-Mobile because they had a deal with a toy company to make a Spider-Mobile toy? Did Walter Simonson have feathers on Velociraptors before scientists proved that they actually DID have feathers? Did the same comic that got sued for ripping off Superman also get sued for ripping off the title of a pulp magazine?

Let’s begin!
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The Line it is Drawn #247 – Superheroes Celebrating Marriage Equality!

Welcome to our weekly gallery of amazing art by our great collection of artistic talent, all working from YOUR suggestions!

Go follow Comics Should Be Good on Twitter (if you have Twitter, that is – if you don’t, you can go sign up). Here is our Twitter page… http://twitter.com/csbg. And here are the Comics Should Be Good writers who are on Twitter (the links go to the person’s Twitter account) – myself, Greg Hatcher, Chad Nevett, Kelly Thompson, Bill Reed, Greg Burgas and Sonia Harris

I update the blog’s Twitter account updates whenever a new post is put up on the blog, so it’s an easy way to keep up with the blog. In addition, I post new content on the blog’s Twitter account.

Now on to the bit!

So every week, I ask a question here. You reply to it on our Twitter page (just write @csbg with your reply) and our artists will each pick one of your suggestions and I will post their drawings based on your suggestions here every week. So every week you will have a new question and you will see the choices picked from the previous week. Here is an archive of all the previous editions of The Line It Is Drawn!

To qualify, you have to be following us when you reply – so go follow us and then give your answer to the following question/challenge (All suggestions due by 3pm Pacific Friday).

This is a special edition of the Line it is Drawn. Our artists already made their selections based on your suggestions for next week’s theme, Hostess Comic Book Ads. This week, they’re going off on their own to each do a special piece celebrating the Supreme Court’s ruling last Friday (the ruling came in after I had sent the theme suggestion out, so it was too late to change it for last week) establishing marriage equality in the United States.

Enjoy!
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Review time! with Heart in a Box

HIABOX_WM-75

“Meat-eating orchids forgive no one just yet; cut myself on angel’s hair and baby’s breath”
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Follow the Path – Gotham City’s Skyline

In this feature I spotlight changes made to comic book characters that are based on outside media. I’m sure you can think of other examples, so feel free to e-mail me at bcronin@comicbookresources.com if you want to suggest some other examples for future installments.

Today, based on a suggestion by Dave H., we look at how DC actually had a storyline to explain how Gotham City’s skyline in the comics matched the skyline in the Tim Burton Batman films.
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1987 And All That: Captain Atom #1-10

A column in which Matt Derman (Comics Matter) reads & reviews comics from 1987, because that’s the year he was born. Click here for an archive of all the previous posts in the series.

CaptainAtom1Captain Atom #1-10 (DC) by Cary Bates, Greg Weisman (#10), Pat Broderick, Bob Smith, Carl Gafford (#1-4, 6-10), Bob LeRose (#5), John Costanza (#1-3), Agustin Mas (#4-5), Duncan Andrews (#6-10), Denny O’Neil

It’s not always an easy distinction to make, but there’s a difference between doing good and being good, and Captain Atom is all about skirting that line. The title character is a good man who does bad things for good reasons, and then uses those bad things to allow himself to do good things, too. After gaining his powers, he is coerced by the U.S. military into being a superhero, but I believe that he probably would’ve chosen that life (or something close to it) for himself anyway because of his core decency and sense of responsibility. He’s a good person doing good deeds, but doing them in an arguably bad way, lying to the world about his past and present in the name of protecting the less-good men who control his life. And there are consequences for his deceptions, sometimes serious ones, meaning that for all the positive work he does, there’s always a certain taint around him, a hidden shame he can never entirely shake. It makes him an extremely interesting character to follow, because even when he’s saving the day as a superhero, the reader understands that he’s still trapped as a soldier, following orders and keeping secrets he doesn’t always like. Captain Atom is a sad but also hopeful figure, improving his life and earning his freedom inch by difficult inch. Continue Reading »

Review time! with San Hannibal

EPSON MFP image

“Where no one seems to mind if you string your words together with Kool cigarettes and sparkling wine; keep the conversation light, wait until the girls get under-dressed and then the talk gets less polite”
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The Great Comic Book Cover Homage Streak: Week 144

It occurs to me that it seems like many comic book covers are homages. Which is fine with me. I have no problem with it. It just made me think, though, how long could I go before I hit a week where NO new comic book was released that had a cover that was an homage to something? Let’s find out! Here is an archive of all the cover homages featured in the streak so far!

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It Is Your Last Chance to Vote for the Greatest Joker Stories Ever Told!

Click here to cast your ballot!

I’ll probably be counting them for a couple of days, so honestly, while the deadline is in a little over three hours, you can probably still trickle in ballots for the next day or so and I’ll still count them.

Comic Book Six Degrees – Jack Kirby to Will Eisner

As suggested by Jenos Idanian #13, the idea behind this game is to connect two comic creators to each other through artists/writers that they have jointly worked together with, in as few links as possible.

For instance, take connecting John Byrne and John Buscema.

Byrne drew Captain America with writer Roger Stern
Roger Stern wrote Avengers with artist John Buscema.

That’s a simple one, but presumably there are more difficult ones out there.

I’ll try to keep the ground rules brief.
1. We’re only using writers and pencilers for this game. No offense to inkers, colorists and letterers, but it makes this too easy if we count them.
2. Plotting counts as writing and breakdowns/layouts count for penciling. Finishes SHOULD count, but I’m not counting them for the same basic reason of #1.
3. Alterations by another penciler don’t count as a connection to the first penciler. Basically, you’re never going to connect an artist with another artist. You can connect writers with each other, though, if they co-wrote (or plotted/scripted) a story. And obviously if an artist wrote a story, you can connect an artist with another artist in that fashion (like John Byrne can connect with Jerry Ordway from Byrne writing stories Ordway penciled).
4. Only comic book stories count. No pin-ups.
5. If a comic story contains multiple writers and artists, it’s up to you to prove that the given writer actually wrote the page in the comic that the artist drew.

Every installment, whoever connects the two creators in the least amount of turns gets to pick the next match (in the event of a tie, the winner is chosen randomly among the people who sent in challenges for the next match.

NOTE: When you folks send in your answers, please include your suggestion for the next match in the event that your answer is chosen. And demonstrate that it IS possible to connect your two suggested choices within six moves. Thanks!

Last week’s match-up was Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez to Kazuo Koike. Rob M. was one of about a half dozen people who was able to connect the two in three moves. He was the randomly selected winner among the six. Here is how he connected the two:

Kazuo Koike wrote and Paul Smith drew a story in X-Men Unlimited #50
Mike Baron wrote and Paul Smith drew Nexus #54 and others
Mike Baron wrote and Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez drew Nexus #30

Rob’s challenge is…

Jack Kirby to Will Eisner

E-mail me your answers at bcronin@comicbookresources.com. Do NOT post your answers in the comments section!

Whoever connects the two characters in the least amount of creators gets to pick the connection for next time around (I’ll pick a random winner in the event of a tie)!

She Has No Head! – Turns Out Laughter Is MY Gateway Drug

It’s taken me very many years to realize this about myself, but basically funny sells me over just about anything else. I mean, we almost universally all love to laugh and so we naturally like funny things, but I have realized I prize it more highly than I understood, and more highly than do a lot of others. I find time and again, what can keep me hooked when it comes to media – especially serialized media like comics and television – is if something is funny. If I can get good laughs week to week (or month to month), out of your creation you have a really good shot at keeping me invested and perhaps even more impressively, becoming a die hard fan.

Astonishing X-Men - you teach ethics

Kitty Pryde and Emma Frost from Joss Whedon and John Cassaday’s run on Astonishing X-Men.

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What I bought – 24 June 2015

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She even learnt the language of a strange country which, Signor Tosetti had been told, some people believed still existed, although no one in the world could say where it was. (The name of this country was Wales.) (Susanna Clarke, from Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell)
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Remember to Forget – That Time That Batman Wet His Pants

In this series we spotlight comic book stories that are likely best left forgotten. Here is an archive of past installments.

Today we look at the disappointing conclusion to the Batman mini-series, The Widening Gyre…
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Comic Book Questions Answered – What, Exactly, Is Captain America’s Shield Made Out Of?

Comic Book Questions Answered – where I answer whatever questions you folks might have about comic books (feel free to e-mail questions to me at bcronin@comicbookresources.com). Here is a link to an archive of all the past questions that have been answered so far.

Reader Elisabeth D. wrote in to ask:

I’ve seen some sources state that Cap’s shield is an alloy of vibranium and steel and others say it’s an alloy of vibranium and adamantium. Which is correct? Has it changed over time?

Read on for the answer, Elisabeth!
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Comics Should Be Good accepts review copies. Anything sent to us will (for better or for worse) end up reviewed on the blog. See where to send the review copies.

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