web stats

Recent Posts

Month of African-American Comics – Nutmeg #1

All this month I’ll be reviewing different comic books by African-American creators, based on submissions from the actual creators of the comic books themselves. Check out the archive to see what books have been spotlighted so far.

Today we look at Nutmeg #1, written and co-created by James F. Wright and drawn and co-created by Jackie Crofts, which is set to be released on March 25th from Action Lab Entertainment.

issue1_CoverTFAW

Continue Reading »

The Great Comic Book Cover Homage Streak: Week 124

It occurs to me that it seems like many comic book covers are homages. Which is fine with me. I have no problem with it. It just made me think, though, how long could I go before I hit a week where NO new comic book was released that had a cover that was an homage to something? Let’s find out! Here is an archive of all the cover homages featured in the streak so far!

Continue Reading »

Comic Book Six Degrees: Elvira to Vampirella

I name two comic book characters. You then have to connect the two using only shared appearances in comic books (official appearances in comics only – no cameos like Terry Austin sneaking Popeye into the background of a panel and no outside comic book appearances, like cartoons and the like). You have to do so using less than six comics total. Covers and pin-ups do not count – only actual appearances in the same comic book story (so it doesn’t count if they each appeared in separate stories inside the same anthology). Mythological characters, public domain characters (other than public domain comic book characters, they’re free game) and real people (by the way, unless a fake name is used for a real person, like Ronald Raygun or whatever, you can use the person even if they are not officially named in the comic) are unique to their own comic book appearances (so DC’s Thor is different than Marvel’s Thor, DC’s Ronald Reagan is different from Marvel’s Ronald Reagan, etc.). But a licensed character is the same in all of their various comic book companies (so the Marvel Red Sonja is the same as the Dynamite Red Sonja) and approved appearances by a real person can go across comic book companies, as well (so, for instance, you can use Marv Wolfman from his Teen Titans appearance to connect with Marv Wolfman in his Fantastic Four appearance – you just can’t use modern appearances by Jack Kirby from one company to connect to Jack Kirby appearances from Marvel Comics, since obviously Kirby can no longer give approval for his appearance). Approval tends to be the key.

Every installment, whoever connects the two characters in the least amount of turns gets to pick the next match (in the event of a tie, the winner is chosen randomly among the people who sent in challenges for the next match. Last time was X-O Manowar to Man-At-Arms. buttler was one about a dozen people to connect them in three moves. Here is how buttler connected the two…

NOTE: Before I begin, let me again request that when you folks send in your answers to please include your suggestion for the next match if your answer is chosen. Oh, and it would be nice if you demonstrate that it IS possible to connect your two suggested choices. Thanks!

X-O Manowar and Blackout were in X-O Manowar/Iron Man in Heavy Metal.
Blackout and Killer Croc were in JLA/Avengers #3
Killer Croc and Man-at-Arms were in DC Universe vs. Masters of the Universe #6

buttler’s challenge is…

Elvira to Vampirella

E-mail me your answers at bcronin@comicbookresources.com. Do NOT post your answers in the comments section!

Whoever connects the two characters in the least amount of comics gets to pick the connection for next time around (I’ll pick a random winner in the event of a tie)!

Remember, only authorized appearances in comic books count (for instance, all the Marvel characters in Savage Dragon/Destroyer Duck do not count)!

Month of African-American Comics – Nowhere Man Volume 2 “Jacked Up,” Book 1

All this month I’ll be reviewing different comic books by African-American creators, based on submissions from the actual creators of the comic books themselves. Check out the archive to see what books have been spotlighted so far.

Today we look at the first book of Volume 2 of Jerome Walford’s Nowhere Man: Jacked Up (I reviewed the first volume, which consisted of three books, last year).

cover

Continue Reading »

She Has No Head! – Love’s Everything To Do With It

bardamiracle

Big Barda and Scott Free. Best comics couple EVER.

I thought about writing about the best romantic couple in comics history for a “Valentine’s Day” themed post but then decided that was boring because the answer was obviously Big Barda and Scott Free. Though if you’d like to double down on NO LOVE I wrote a piece about Anti-Love: Great Nemesis pairings over on Lit Reactor.

Anyway, instead I thought maybe I’d write some more somewhat stream of consciousness thoughts on why we all love comics so much. Last time I did this when I was trying to work out “defining superheroes” we got so many thoughtful comments and discussions going as a result (the post forthcoming from that discussion is still percolating in my brain, it’s a time consuming one, even beyond the whole “superhero definition question”). Anyway, if we’re even half as lucky this time around, it will still have been an exercise well worth the effort. So I’m going to begin my rambling, and I urge you to put down your own thoughts in the comments.

Continue Reading »

I Love Ya But You’re Strange – That Time Spider-Man Fought…the Measles?!?

Every installment of I Love Ya But You’re Strange I spotlight strange but ultimately endearing comic stories. Here is the archive of all the installments of this feature. Feel free to e-mail me at bcronin@comicbookresources.com if you have a suggestion for a future installment!

Today I thought I’d go with a rather topical story (for a 41-year-old comic book) of Spider-Man’s battle against…the measles?!
Continue Reading »

Comic Book Legends Revealed Addendum: Paul Smith’s Rejected Wonder Woman Design

In this week’s Comic Book Legends Revealed, I featured a story about how Paul Smith’s original designs for a Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman “Year One” type project (to be written by Jeph Loeb) were rejected, in part because of the pants that he had Wonder Woman wearing. On Sunday, Paul did a piece on his blog featuring his designs for the story. He noted that I had neglected to show any examples of what he would have had Wonder Woman wearing. I was confused, as I didn’t recall him sending me any examples. I’m no dummy, if Paul Smith sends me artwork, I’m sure as heck going to show that artwork as Paul Smith’s artwork is amazing. However, as it turned out, I WAS a dummy! I had missed the image attachment in Paul’s e-mail. So here, without any further ado, are Paul Smith’s rejected designs for Wonder Woman from the late 1990s project “Love and War”…
Continue Reading »

Month of African-American Comics – Fashion Forward Books 1-3

All this month I’ll be reviewing different comic books by African-American creators, based on submissions from the actual creators of the comic books themselves. Check out the archive to see what books have been spotlighted so far.

Today we look at the first three books of Fashion Forward by Shawnee and Shawnelle Gibbs (writers) and Linda Chung (artist). Covers by JM Tolman (Books #1 & 2) and Adam Fay (Book 3).

Fashion-Forward-Book-1-CoverFashion-Forward-Book-2-CoverFashion-Forward-Book-3-Cover

Continue Reading »

Top Five Most Iconic Daredevil Covers

Here are my picks for the top five most iconic covers featuring Daredevil (with iconic being determined by what covers are most established and most recognized when it comes to Daredevil, with a preference towards covers that are homaged a lot). This is not a BEST cover list and due to the very nature of icons, very few (if any) recent covers will be on the list. A notable exception to the rules is that I don’t count covers from a character’s first appearance (which isn’t applicable to all characters, of course, just those who appeared on the cover of the comic they debuted in), as those tend to be automatically iconic so they’re boring. Here‘s a list of all characters featured so far.

Enjoy!

Continue Reading »

Month of African-American Comics – “Grovers” from Disruption: An Anthology

All this month I’ll be reviewing different comic books by African-American creators, based on submissions from the actual creators of the comic books themselves. Check out the archive to see what books have been spotlighted so far.

Today we look at “Grovers” by J.N. Monk (writer and also the co-editor of the anthology) and Kelly Angel (artist)

0_-_Disruption_Cover_Page

Continue Reading »

The Annual Inventory, 2015 Edition

It’s that time of year when I look at the pull list I have with my local retailer and decide what stays and what goes. Join me, won’t you? Continue Reading »

What I bought – 4 February 2015

EPSON MFP image

Another poet compared his beloved’s upper-lip hairs to the feathers of a parrot feeding a pistachio to the beloved’s lips. To help me appreciate the richness of this poetic image, Diloram drew a picture of it in my notebook. It was terrifying. (Elif Batumen, from The Possessed)
Continue Reading »

Month of African-American Comics – Hero Born #1

All this month I’ll be reviewing different comic books by African-American creators, based on submissions from the actual creators of the comic books themselves. Check out the archive to see what books have been spotlighted so far.

Today we look at Hero Born #1 by Robert Garrett (writer and creator) and Peter Cacho (artist).

heroborn1

Continue Reading »

Comic Book Legends Revealed #509

Welcome to the five hundred and ninth in a series of examinations of comic book legends and whether they are true or false. Click here for an archive of the first five hundred (I actually haven’t been able to update it in a while). For the next three weeks, in the lead-up to the Oscars, I’ll feature at least one comic legend involving an Oscar-nominated film (as per the request of long-time reader Arthur K.). This week, which famous comic book artist designed Indiana Jones? How did Wonder Woman’s PANTS get in the way of a comic book project? And did the Punisher seriously kill jaywalkers at one point?

Let’s begin!
Continue Reading »

The Line it is Drawn #226 – Harley Quinn Team-Ups!

Welcome to our weekly gallery of amazing art by our great collection of artistic talent, all working from YOUR suggestions!

Go follow Comics Should Be Good on Twitter (if you have Twitter, that is – if you don’t, you can go sign up). Here is our Twitter page… http://twitter.com/csbg. And here are the Comics Should Be Good writers who are on Twitter (the links go to the person’s Twitter account) – myself, Greg Hatcher, Chad Nevett, Kelly Thompson, Bill Reed, Greg Burgas and Sonia Harris

I update the blog’s Twitter account updates whenever a new post is put up on the blog, so it’s an easy way to keep up with the blog. In addition, I post new content on the blog’s Twitter account.

Now on to the bit!

So every week, I ask a question here. You reply to it on our Twitter page (just write @csbg with your reply) and our artists will each pick one of your suggestions and I will post their drawings based on your suggestions here every week. So every week you will have a new question and you will see the choices picked from the previous week. Here is an archive of all the previous editions of The Line It Is Drawn!

To qualify, you have to be following us when you reply – so go follow us and then give your answer to the following question/challenge (All suggestions due by 3pm Pacific Friday).

The topic is…

It’s almost Valentine’s Day! Suggest a comic book character (or multiple comic book characters, I suppose) and our artists will draw a Valentine’s Day card featuring that character.

Read on for the drawings that came about courtesy of the last question/challenge!

Team-up comic book characters with Harley Quinn!

Enjoy!
Continue Reading »

Categories

Review Copies

Comics Should Be Good accepts review copies. Anything sent to us will (for better or for worse) end up reviewed on the blog. See where to send the review copies.

Browse the Archives